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tboussie
07-04-2019, 10:00 AM
Latest update as of 0830 7/4:

Dura Mater - retired, confirmed back in berth
Daisenís Den - retired, visually sighted back in the Bay headed to Alameda
Mulan - retired, confirmed back in berth (charging issues)
X-1 - retired, confirmed back in berth (sea sickness, extremely rough seas)

Sunquest - turned around, approaching GG Bridge (reports taking on water, but safe)

Rainbow - turned around and then turned back racing (no report)

10 boats still racing in what looks to be wind dropping into the high teens. Surprise due west, remainder of fleet south as far as Monterrey Bay.

tboussie
07-04-2019, 01:00 PM
Messages from Will on S/V SEA WISDOM (Hinckley 42) at 1100 this morning:

I'm doing well. Conditions NW 20-30 kts, seas 7-10 ft. Last night was rather rough, NW 30-40 kts.

I am 100 nm from 126.40. I should make turnaround point around 2-3 AM tonight.

It is rough. I am lucky to have a bigger and more well protected boat. I don't know how those smaller boats could deal with these kinds of conditions.

tboussie
07-04-2019, 01:05 PM
Got following text messages from Michael on Mulan:

9:13 PM (near the Farallones): Heading back - battery not charging!

12:45 AM: Just docked, whew... Plus I fell and I think I broke a rib or two [RC note, he is a physician]. Oh well, hope the other boats are through the worst part. Really gnarly!!!



LP RC

tboussie
07-04-2019, 03:41 PM
All of the boats still racing successfully sent manual "life aboard" messages to the RC today, as did SKYE who are bearing off for Moss Landing.

Their comments:

LIBRA - I'm still alive!
SURPRISE! - Rough race but easing a bit. ETA at turnaround is currently midnight. All is well.
RIFF RIDER - I'm okay.
TORTUGA - All is well on Tortuga. Big sea making it giddy up!
GALAXSEA - All is okay.
RAINBOW - Rainbow is sailing and all is well.
SEA WISDOM - (see previous post)
SHARK ON BLUEGRASS - All well on Shark. Wind 12-15, bumpy ride.
NIGHTMARE - Checking in, everything is ok.

tboussie
07-05-2019, 11:42 AM
Latest update 1030 7/5

SKYE has made it back safely to her home port in Moss Landing.

All other boats except RAINBOW have touched and turned for SF. Can expect RAINBOW to do so later today.

NIGHTMARE appears to have turned back before the 126'40" mark.

SURPRISE! reports autopilot issues and is hand steering while attempting repairs. The RC is in communication with Bob and will update this forum on his status.

Philpott
07-05-2019, 01:19 PM
Bob would be the first person* to analyze this:

Rule 41 Outside Help
A boat shall not receive help from any outside source, except

(a) help for a crewmember who is ill, injured or in danger;
(b) after a collision, help from the crew of the other vessel to get clear;
(c) help in the form of *information freely available to all boats;
(d) unsolicited information from a disinterested source, which may be another boat in the same race.
However, a boat that gains a significant advantage in the race from help received under rule 41(a) may be protested and penalized; any penalty may be less than disqualification.

* well, once he has rested up

tboussie
07-05-2019, 01:22 PM
Bob would be the first person to analyze this:

Rule 41 Outside Help
A boat shall not receive help from any outside source, except

(a) help for a crewmember who is ill, injured or in danger;
(b) after a collision, help from the crew of the other vessel to get clear;
(c) help in the form of *information freely available to all boats;
(d) unsolicited information from a disinterested source, which may be another boat in the same race.
However, a boat that gains a significant advantage in the race from help received under rule 41(a) may be protested and penalized; any penalty may be less than disqualification.

I believe Bob is aware of the outside help rule. The nature of his message suggested that he was soliciting advice and that remaining in the race was secondary. I will confirm with him before communicating anything that would constitute outside assistance.

Tom

tboussie
07-05-2019, 01:59 PM
All boats still on the course successfully sent in manual "life aboard" messages today.

Their comments:

LIBRA - S/V Libra, daily checkin. 1st night was rough with a sporty head sail change with winds above 30 knots. Solent up and genoa is fasten on deck since then […]
[...] Yesterday conditions have been better. Wind 20 to 28kn. Last night was quiet. Turned around at W126'40" at 6:15am today. Now heading back home! […]
[...] Btw, the 1st night, despite the rough sea and weather, was an absolutely beautiful sky, to be remembered, with gorgeous views of the Milky Way. S/V Libra
SURPRISE! - Surprise! is having difficulties but okay for now.
RIFF RIDER - Im nk
TORTUGA - All ok on tortuga!. . C265 S5.5. . . 36. 00. 49. . . 126. 27. 10. Almost to turn around.
GALAXSEA - All is ok.
RAINBOW - Rainbow is sailing and all is well.
SEA WISDOM - So happy to be on a beam reach finally!
SHARK ON BLUEGRASS - All well on the shark, on my way home, light wind but bumpy ...
NIGHTMARE - Checking in, everything is ok.

Gamayun
07-05-2019, 03:41 PM
I believe Bob is aware of the outside help rule. The nature of his message suggested that he was soliciting advice and that remaining in the race was secondary. I will confirm with him before communicating anything that would constitute outside assistance.

Tom

My understanding of "outside help" is that it doesn't extend to help on fixing equipment that is integral to the safety of the skipper and vessel. The same thing happened to Mike on Jacqueline in the 2016 SHTP and many other times that I've been told about.

WBChristie
07-05-2019, 04:02 PM
My understanding of "outside help" is that it doesn't extend to help on fixing equipment that is integral to the safety of the skipper and vessel. The same thing happened to Mike on Jacqueline in the 2016 SHTP and many other times that I've been told about.

Does it make a difference if the boat is vying for the overall.....? This gets interesting if "being in danger" is because you lost your autopilot.

Philpott
07-05-2019, 04:28 PM
Regardless of whether the boat is vying for overall or just finishing the race, the decision is Bob's to make, and he is a Corinthian sailor. But here's a nice bit: When the call went out from the LongPac Race Chair (Tom Boussie), the RC B Team responded by googling B&G 5000 and Robertson 2000. Huh? The B Team doesn't know what those items are, but supposes that Google will connect the dots, as indeed Google does.

According to Google, Reliable Marine in Alameda is a certified dealer of something called a B&G 5000. I call their number and Roger answers.

"Hi, Roger, this is Jackie Philpott."

"Hi, Jackie."

"I'm calling about a singlehanded friend offshore doing the Longpac. He's having difficulty with his B&G autopilot. Could you walk him through a fix?"

"Well, sure, except that I'm in the engine room of a boat right now. The person you want to contact is Eric Steinberg over at Farallon Electronics."

"Great. Do you have his number?"

"No, but he's in Sausalito. I'd help but, like I said, I'm in the engine room of a boat just now."

"Okay, thanks, Roger!"

So then the RC B team googled Farallon Electronics and called the phone number listed.

Eric answered. On the day after Fourth of July. These boat people. They're nuts.

"Hi, this is Jackie Philpott."

Pause. Very politely: "Hi, Jackie."

At this point I need to point out that neither of these very civil men has any idea who I am, nor do I own stock in their companies.

"I'm calling about a singlehanded friend offshore doing the Longpac. He's having difficulty with his B&G autopilot. Could you walk him through a fix?"

Eric is interested now.

"Oh yeah? The Longpac, huh?"

J: Is there any way that you could advise him about a fix for his B&G autopilot by way of Satphone?"

E: What's the skipper's name?

J: Bob Johnston with a T.

E: Oh, yeah. That unit was in the boat when he bought it. He and I talked about it recently. Sure. Give him my personal cell phone."

I thanked him and passed the information on to the RC A Team. So whether Bob calls Eric or not, or whether he decides to hand steer Surprise! the last 140 nm or not, it is his decision. My work here is done. But remember these two men when you need to buy electronics for your boat, because you can count on them.

WBChristie
07-05-2019, 04:56 PM
Yeah, its Bobs call to make. During the shtp, we frequently talked to each other ... I remember Peter had some trouble with his SSB and the rest of us made encouraging noises about what we thought it might be (although he figured it out himself).... isn't it ok for competitors to help each other?

WBChristie
07-05-2019, 05:05 PM
I guess not:
10 OUTSIDE ASSISTANCE
10.01 No physical contact except for the passing of written messages may be made with other
vessels at sea, and no stores may be received from any ship or aircraft during the Race, except
for the passing of medical supplies.
10.02 During the Race, no yacht may receive private or publicly available internet-distributed
information regarding weather, currents, course routing or other tactical advice, with the
following specific exceptions:
[a] Receipt of publicly available radio weather broadcasts.
Diagrams commonly referred to as “weatherfax” generated by NOAA , or
corresponding agencies of other countries, along with text forecasts from such publicly
available sources.
[c] Communication on open radio channels [without encryption] with other competitors,
which may consist of information such as current position, weather and sea conditions.
[B][d] Solicitation and receipt of information solely about the repair of any equipment on
board, but not including routing advice.
[e] Weather data commonly referred to as GRIB files, derived without 3rd party
manipulation or enhancement from weather models operated by NOAA or analogous
agencies of other countries.
[f] The information about each yacht listed in RRC Rule 6.02 (but no other competitor
data).

AntsUiga
07-05-2019, 05:44 PM
I am wondering while sitting on porch in Prescott - do we have two separate issues, competing in the Longpac and completing a SHTP qualifier. Granted, I am decades out of date.

If there is a rules violation and the skipper is disqualified from Longpac trophies, does the distance sailed still count as a bonafide qualifier. Not trying to cause problems, but in the past the sailing qualifier was not governed by racing rules.

Ants

Gamayun
07-05-2019, 07:07 PM
Does it make a difference if the boat is vying for the overall.....? This gets interesting if "being in danger" is because you lost your autopilot.

That's certainly reasonable. There doesn't seem to be any danger, per se, in losing one's auto pilot, but if the person should be able to get outside support just so they can remain racing and not have to hand steer, then I can see that that is just having it both ways. Furshur, Bob know this. Me, I'm just curious about it; I don't have a racer's mentality because if I were faced with hand steering for 18 hours heading toward the gate and those shipping lanes, I'd accept the outside support and just call it.

Gamayun
07-05-2019, 07:08 PM
If there is a rules violation and the skipper is disqualified from Longpac trophies, does the distance sailed still count as a bonafide qualifier. Not trying to cause problems, but in the past the sailing qualifier was not governed by racing rules.

Ants

My understanding is that the miles still count. He is sailing them. No doubt about that!

Now, if he gets towed in the last 50 miles, that seems likely it would not...

Philpott
07-05-2019, 07:24 PM
And let's not forget this:

ORGANIZING AUTHORITY

1.1 The Race shall be under the authority of the Race Committee of the Singlehanded Sailing Society (SSS RC), which shall have full power to establish and interpret the rules and conditions governing the Race, to decide all protests, and to reject the entry of any yacht at any time prior to the preparatory signal of the
Race.

tboussie
07-05-2019, 07:38 PM
Update from the 2019 LongPac RC 1830 7/5/19

Bob on SURPRISE! has declined outside assistance, deciding instead to "tough it out". That translates to likely 24+ total hrs of hand steering to get home safely. This will not come as a SURPRISE to those of who know, and have sailed against, Bob.

Good luck to him and the rest of the fleet as they prepare for what could be another tough night.


RC

Gamayun
07-05-2019, 08:21 PM
Update from the 2019 LongPac RC 1830 7/5/19

Bob on SURPRISE! has declined outside assistance, deciding instead to "tough it out". That translates to likely 24+ total hrs of hand steering to get home safely. This will not come as a SURPRISE to those of who know, and have sailed against, Bob.

Good luck to him and the rest of the fleet as they prepare for what could be another tough night.


RC

All the best to Bob and to the other racers who are toughing it out in those conditions. It's likely to be a long 24 hours for all.

jamottep
07-05-2019, 08:22 PM
10 OUTSIDE ASSISTANCE
10.02 During the Race, no yacht may receive private or publicly available internet-distributed
information regarding weather, currents, course routing or other tactical advice, with the
following specific exceptions:
[d] Solicitation and receipt of information solely about the repair of any equipment on
board.

Why is there confusion here? The above clearly states that it is ok to get verbal assistance to repair stuff. This is standard across all offshore effects that I know of.

Intermission
07-05-2019, 08:25 PM
T I don't have a racer's mentality because if I were faced with hand steering for 18 hours heading toward the gate and those shipping lanes, I'd accept the outside support and just call it.

No Racer here, but I couldn't round Pt.Sur once on my way North, and had to turn tail back to Morro; it took all night.
I haven't drank any soda in about 17 years, but I keep a few onboard, along with some Trader Joe's dark chocolate covered espresso beans for those times when I could get caught out.

WBChristie
07-05-2019, 08:53 PM
Right

Why is there confusion here? The above clearly states that it is ok to get verbal assistance to repair stuff. This is standard across all offshore effects that I know of.

tboussie
07-05-2019, 09:26 PM
Text message to RC from Bob on SURPRISE! indicating that he is in good shape for the last leg home:

Surprise! is hove to for dinner and rest. Talked on radio with Sea Wisdom after sighting him here 60 nm WSW of SE Farallon. All is well.

LP RC

tboussie
07-06-2019, 09:16 AM
LongPac Update 0730 7/6/19

At 0330 this morning SEA WISDOM contacted RC to let them know that they had lost their rudder about 5 nm SW of the Farallones and that they were steering with their hydrovane. William expressed concern as the rudder post was slamming against the hull and he feared it would breach the hull over time. He was in contact with the CG who were monitoring the situation. At 0530 SEA WISDOM contacted the CG to let them know that he had lost all steerage and to request assistance. They have dispatched a vessel to provide a tow. SEA WISDOM is currently SE of the Farallones, ~20 nm from the Gate.

SURPRISE! has apparently hove to twice overnight and is currently ~60 nm from the Gate. Last communication indicated that Bob is okay and the boat is sound.

RIFF RIDER now expected to be first boat to finish, likely in the early afternoon. We expect 7 of 8 boats to make it back to SF some time today. TORTUGA is ~100 nm from the Gate and will likely finish early tomorrow morning. Randy texted at 0800 this morning: "Rough night but all ok on tortuga. . C55. S5.8. . 36. 52.95. . 124.12.39. hoping the winds calm down".


LP RC

AlanH
07-06-2019, 09:44 AM
Seasickness took it's toll aboard Skye. Even with a Scopolamine patch, George got hit with it starting before we crossed the Potato Patch. It was a tough afternoon, with him functional but dry heaving and unable to keep down even water. AFter nightfall, he started shivering, which was not good. Wednesday night was one of the 2-3 most unpleasant nights I've spent at sea. Winds were 27-35, but it was the completely random washing machine of the sea state that was so tough. Skye held up fine, we had some minor gear failure but nothing big. I was glad I'd finished a really substantial emergency rudder earlier, but really did not want to have to deploy it. Thursday morning, George reported that for all that work we'd made 78 miles. If we turn around for Moss Landing we'd cover the 150 miles on the boat that I needed to qualify for Pac Cup, and he still had not eaten or drunk anything. Qualifying for Pac Cup was the main reason for doing the race, and neither of us could see putting George through another two days of that sort of misery, so around we went. Of course as soon as the motion changed George improved, so we actually had a nice sail back into Moss Landing. The first 4-5 hours though....still a washing machine with no discernable wave pattern out there.

brianb
07-06-2019, 09:53 AM
####

WBChristie
07-06-2019, 10:04 AM
Wonderful effort from SEA WISDOM, well done

tboussie
07-06-2019, 11:38 AM
Update on SHARK ON BLUEGRASS from RC

SOB's tracker shows him headed due West, obviously of concern. We asked the CG to contact him by VHF - happily he is in fact 15 miles from the Gate headed home. Must be a tracker malfunction.

Wylieguy
07-06-2019, 12:48 PM
I asked a friend who has a similar AP. He got back to me today. If someone want's to forward this to Bob, do so. Pat

Pat,

Just saw this. Iím probably not much help but hereís what I know.

We have a very similar or identical unit on Escapade. The clutch is a valve in the hydraulic circuit and is normally open (fluid just circulates) or closed when autopilot is engaged. The valve is controlled by a solenoid which in turn driven by electrical signal from AP Junction Box.

It sounds like the AP wonít engage, which would mean


Electrical connection issue from AP Junction Box to HLD2000, specifically AP Clutch signal or ground
If not 1 then clutch solenoid has failed.
If not 1 or 2, then the system might be low in fluid (pump is pumping, clutch valve is closed)


As to at-sea fixes:


Check electrical connection (voltmeter) Ė preferably at the HLD2000 end, both for the clutch and the pump motor drive.
If the solenoid itself has failed (wonít close) I doubt thereís much that could be done.


Where would he be at this point?

Gamayun
07-06-2019, 02:20 PM
Is anyone planning to meet the boats on their boat? I'd like to tag along if I can (415.484.6985)

tboussie
07-06-2019, 03:29 PM
2019 LongPac Update - 1430 7/6//19

SEA WISDOM was safely towed in by the CG. I spoke with Will and he is understandably disappointed to get within 20 nm of the finish as the runaway winner only to have his rudder break. He does not think he hit anything. The rudder apparently slipped down several inches and was banging back in forth in the lower bearing. He is getting it towed to KKMI for haul out and repairs.

The first four boats have finished! After 3 days and >400 nm, SHARK ON BLUEGRASS and LIBRA finished within 12 seconds of each other, followed 3.5 minutes later by GALAXSEA. RIFF RIDER followed 18 minutes thereafter.

Finish times:
SOB 1:42:18
LIBRA 1:42:30
GALAXSEA 1:46:00
RIFF RIDER 2:08:37

We are expecting NIGHTMARE in the next couple of hours, SURPRISE! later this evening, and TORTUGA some time in the early AM tomorrow.

Philpott
07-06-2019, 03:48 PM
Is anyone planning to meet the boats on their boat? I'd like to tag along if I can (415.484.6985)

Iím at GGYC, Carliane w DM. Cí mon over. Anyone else?

Philpott
07-06-2019, 04:24 PM
Cliff is flying into the finish @ 17 knots!

tboussie
07-06-2019, 10:43 PM
LongPac Update

SURPRISE! crossed the line at 19:44:17 and headed to Richmond (and presumably to bed).

Expecting the last boat TORTUGA before 0200 tomorrow.


RC

tboussie
07-07-2019, 02:34 AM
TORTUGA crossed the finish line at 01:19:30 this morning to close out the 2019 LongPac. Final scoring will be posted contingent on racers providing proof of crossing the 126 degrees 40 minutes line of longitude.

I am sure there will be many exciting (and perhaps informative) stories at the awards ceremony on July 24, 2019 @1930 (location tbd). See you there.


RC

sleddog
07-07-2019, 09:16 AM
TORTUGA crossed the finish line at 01:19:30 this morning to close out the 2019 LongPac. Final scoring will be posted contingent on racers providing proof of crossing the 126 degrees 40 minutes line of longitude.
I am sure there will be many exciting (and perhaps informative) stories at the awards ceremony on July 24, 2019 @1930 (location tbd). See you there. RC

Big thanks and congrats Tom, for the many hours, days, weeks of challenging logistics and cat herding in the SSS efforts of getting the LongPac contingent out and back safely. This race would not have happened without your dedicated efforts.

A question for any who want to respond. What is a good online location for those out of the area and unable to speak with this year's LongPackers, whether finishers or not. I for one will not be able to attend the trophy presentation, yet would love to hear as many "debriefs" as possible. Maybe right here on this thread? Or someplace else?

There is a much experience to be shared, almost all valuable to SSS'ers and friends. Prep, safety, navigation, sail handling, breakage. Basically, what was done that worked, and what didn't.

As the fleet and RC decompresses, a couple of subjects where currently there are more questions than answers:

~ Did any skippers and/or crew take seasickness meds before or during the Race?
~ What was the proximate cause of SEA WISDOM's rudder loss? Did the rudder drop down, or disappear completely? What was the towline secured to?
~ What was the cause of SURPRISE's AP failure, and what could be done differently?
~ What was the best sail combo for what boats in 20-35 knots. Roller jib reefing, hanks, mains'l slab reefing or other.
~ What was the cause of possible broken ribs? Above or below decks?
~ Can the trackers be more synched in the fleet so boats are not pinging at different times and intervals?
~ What was the cause of tracker malfunction that caused a Health and Welfare call to the CG by the RC?

Thanks to AlanH for already having shared his and George's sobering but ultimately successful experience aboard SKYE.

Daydreamer
07-07-2019, 12:39 PM
Thank you race committee!!
I think this was a pretty busy race to monitor!

I felt Nightmare was well prepared and looked foreword to the race.
We had a decent start, footing off a bit for speed.

I am susceptible to seasickness and use scopolamine the effectively.
The washing machine however was no joke! I got hit anyway.
The first night being the worst, and next day only a little better.

Sail plan was a main with three reefs and a #3. Storm jib ready.
Working with the 1& 2 reefs kept us going.
The first a/p drive gave up early the second evening, and swapped in a backup.

Nearing the turn around point, the last degree seemed to take forever!
In my seasick addled brain I thought 126-20 to be the mark.
100 miles later the thought crept in, was I wrong?
Dug out the SI, sure enough, I messed up. Were we 25 or even 50 miles away I might have gone back, but at 100, nope.

As the point of sail turned more reachy, I began to eat and drink more and feel a bit better.
During the third night, the second a/p drive dis-assembled itself and as I came on deck a gully washer swept half its guts overboard. The little st 2000 backup just doesn't have te power or speed for these conditions but can give me a break for a nap.
Hand steering that last night was pretty surreal. Following the stars and going by feel.
Ultimately coming back too far north again I crossed into the Gulf of the Farallones at Noonday Rock.

I could hear the CG end of the Sea Wisdom conversation but too far away to get there before the CG.

The wind died out at Duxbury Reef and since I was already disqualified from the race, had no problem starting the engine to get us to Point Bonita.
I called in to the R/C announcing my approach to the finish and retirement from the race.

Nightmare fared well, skipper fairly well. A few more a/p spares and we'll be ready to go!

Philpott
07-07-2019, 07:57 PM
https://vimeo.com/346774036

AlanH
07-07-2019, 09:34 PM
Big thanks and congrats Tom, for the many hours, days, weeks of challenging logistics and cat herding in the SSS efforts of getting the LongPac contingent out and back safely. This race would not have happened without your dedicated efforts.

A question for any who want to respond. What is a good online location for those out of the area and unable to speak with this year's LongPackers, whether finishers or not. I for one will not be able to attend the trophy presentation, yet would love to hear as many "debriefs" as possible. Maybe right here on this thread? Or someplace else?

There is a much experience to be shared, almost all valuable to SSS'ers and friends. Prep, safety, navigation, sail handling, breakage. Basically, what was done that worked, and what didn't.

As the fleet and RC decompresses, a couple of subjects where currently there are more questions than answers:

~ Did any skippers and/or crew take seasickness meds before or during the Race?
~ What was the proximate cause of SEA WISDOM's rudder loss? Did the rudder drop down, or disappear completely? What was the towline secured to?
~ What was the cause of SURPRISE's AP failure, and what could be done differently?
~ What was the best sail combo for what boats in 20-35 knots. Roller jib reefing, hanks, mains'l slab reefing or other.
~ What was the cause of possible broken ribs? Above or below decks?
~ Can the trackers be more synched in the fleet so boats are not pinging at different times and intervals?
~ What was the cause of tracker malfunction that caused a Health and Welfare call to the CG by the RC?

Thanks to AlanH for already having shared his and George's sobering but ultimately successful experience aboard SKYE.

Regarding seasickness medications: I took the CVS generic meclizine, 25 mg tablets. The first one was about an hour before the start, the second one about 20 hours later. I had no issues. George had the scopolamine patch and he got hammered immediately.

Sails...Dacron, full batten main with two reefs. I've not sailed with full battens before and I'm sold for keeping the sail from flogging itself to shreds when the main is eased in heavy winds.

We had an 80% high-clew headsail up the whole time, but actually rolled it up to about 60% for most of Wednesday night.

Dazzler
07-07-2019, 10:23 PM
Adding to Sled’s list of “more questions than answers...”
We hope to hear some debrief about energy management, especially with so many boats using electronics and electric autopilots. This is an obvious issue for anyone contemplating the SHTP. How was it? What were the charging issues on MULAN?
Tom P.

Gamayun
07-08-2019, 12:08 AM
Big thanks and congrats Tom, for the many hours, days, weeks of challenging logistics and cat herding in the SSS efforts of getting the LongPac contingent out and back safely. This race would not have happened without your dedicated efforts.

A question for any who want to respond. What is a good online location for those out of the area and unable to speak with this year's LongPackers, whether finishers or not. I for one will not be able to attend the trophy presentation, yet would love to hear as many "debriefs" as possible. Maybe right here on this thread? Or someplace else?


Big thanks to Tom as RC and keeping the cats all herding nicely together. Skip, if we think about it ahead of time, we should be able to set up a steaming video or at least a Skype connection for those who'd like to listen in. I'll see what I can do to facilitate this.

BobJ
07-08-2019, 10:55 AM
I plan to post race details but I still can't organize my brain. And I'm still bouncing - the physical effects feel more post-SHTP than post-LongPac. This one was a doozy!
Returning to RYC after the finish, I literally couldn't dock the boat. Dock mates were stationed at all four corners and on the third or fourth try, I got it lined up enough to get into the slip.

Yesterday I did a thorough boat clean-up and damage assessment. Damage minor: Jib furling line nearly chafed through, lower shrouds very loose, head area wet due to a leaky hatch, a minor rub from the plastic dock rail (which cleaned right up) and of course, no autopilot. I hope to talk through the AP issues today with Eric Steinberg. After studying the sequence of error codes it appears I may have just worn out the old Robertson drive.

Thanks to the R/C, dock mates and all my friends in the SSS. More to come.

dolfinbill
07-08-2019, 06:45 PM
Great job Bob on first leading the race and then dealing with the autopilot and sleep issues. I hope this means you will be sailing to Hanalei Bay next summer.

Daydreamer
07-08-2019, 07:24 PM
Just to show how whacked out I was,
I'm still flabbergasted!

4513

BobJ
07-08-2019, 08:41 PM
Greg, I am so sorry. I understand all-too-well how it could happen, but that doesn't take away the sting.

Gamayun
07-08-2019, 09:51 PM
Greg, that just sucks. I'm so sorry. It doesn't, however, diminish you doing the race in very 'sporty' conditions.

BobJ
07-08-2019, 10:49 PM
I've tried in vain to organize the race into an ordered commentary, so I'll just post recollections as they come to mind. Here are a few about being forced to hand-steer for long stretches:

Surprise! is fast. Her speed comes from low wetted surface/prismatic coefficient and a short-chord keel and spade rudder. She lacks the directional stability of say, a Cal 40 with it's much longer keel. She balances well but you simply can't let go of the helm, even briefly.

Having placed an over-reliance on her supposedly robust hydraulic linear drive, I hadn't set up an alternative sheet-to-steering arrangement or backup cockpit AP. The Pelagic I saved from Ragtime! was on the workbench at home. So I had two options: Hand-steer or heave-to. I hove-to three times on the way back, evident from the track. The first time was to attempt to restore the AP and failing that, to communicate with the R/C and prepare for 14-18 hours of hand steering to get home. I moved everything I thought I'd need into the cockpit, made/ate a sandwich and used the head. Then I got back underway.

The second heave-to was after seeing and talking with Sea Wisdom. I had to take a break, eat and get some rest. I no longer considered myself to be in the race and was just focused on getting home without assistance. I set my alarm for 90 minutes and got up at 0130, feeling pretty good and thinking I might be able to gut it out the rest of the way. I was wrong.

I don't remember how long it was, but it was still dark when I hove-to the third time. I was starting to push the tiller the wrong way and accidentally jibed a couple times in the strong wind. I'd had a canned, high-caffeine drink and concentrated as hard as I could on the compass, but I couldn't stay with it. So I called VTS on Ch. 12 to see if they could locate me on AIS. That team is great. They knew right where I was and although they couldn't make any promises, they said I could stop for awhile without being in the path of any ships. In fact, they said the next ship shouldn't be transiting that area until the next day around 1300. When I awoke it was getting light and I was shocked at the amount of wind and the size and steepness of the waves. "I have to start sailing in THIS?"

On a lighter note:

I got cold at one point, not quite shivering but needing more layers. Everything was out of reach in the cabin and I didn't want to heave-to again. What could I do? The telescoping boat hook was within reach in the cockpit locker so I extended it and poked around in the pile of clothes below and speared another mid-layer. With one hand always on the tiller it was a chore to get the foulies off, don the mid-layer and put everything back on. Peeing was a total PITA for similar reasons.

mike cunningham
07-09-2019, 08:19 AM
I've tried in vain to organize the race into an ordered commentary, so I'll just post recollections as they come to mind. Here are a few about being forced to hand-steer for long stretches:

Surprise! is fast. Her speed comes from low wetted surface/prismatic coefficient and a short-chord keel and spade rudder. She lacks the directional stability of say, a Cal 40 with it's much longer keel. She balances well but you simply can't let go of the helm, even briefly.

Having placed an over-reliance on her supposedly robust hydraulic linear drive, I hadn't set up an alternative sheet-to-steering arrangement or backup cockpit AP. The Pelagic I saved from Ragtime! was on the workbench at home. So I had two options: Hand-steer or heave-to. I hove-to three times on the way back, evident from the track. The first time was to attempt to restore the AP and failing that, to communicate with the R/C and prepare for 14-18 hours of hand steering to get home. I moved everything I thought I'd need into the cockpit, made/ate a sandwich and used the head. Then I got back underway.

The second heave-to was after seeing and talking with Sea Wisdom. I had to take a break, eat and get some rest. I no longer considered myself to be in the race and was just focused on getting home without assistance. I set my alarm for 90 minutes and got up at 0130, feeling pretty good and thinking I might be able to gut it out the rest of the way. I was wrong.

I don't remember how long it was, but it was still dark when I hove-to the third time. I was starting to push the tiller the wrong way and accidentally jibed a couple times in the strong wind. I'd had a canned, high-caffeine drink and concentrated as hard as I could on the compass, but I couldn't stay with it. So I called VTS on Ch. 12 to see if they could locate me on AIS. That team is great. They knew right where I was and although they couldn't make any promises, they said I could stop for awhile without being in the path of any ships. In fact, they said the next ship shouldn't be transiting that area until the next day around 1300. When I awoke it was getting light and I was shocked at the amount of wind and the size and steepness of the waves. "I have to start sailing in THIS?"

On a lighter note:

I got cold at one point, not quite shivering but needing more layers. Everything was out of reach in the cabin and I didn't want to heave-to again. What could I do? The telescoping boat hook was within reach in the cockpit locker so I extended it and poked around in the pile of clothes below and speared another mid-layer. With one hand always on the tiller it was a chore to get the foulies off, don the mid-layer and put everything back on. Peeing was a total PITA for similar reasons.

Man, does that sound familiar. In 15 the wind wasn't nearly as bad as you all experienced this time but the sleep issue and hand steering sucked. I wish I had done what you did and hove to for awhile to get some sack time.

pogen
07-09-2019, 11:36 AM
Having placed an over-reliance on her supposedly robust hydraulic linear drive, I hadn't set up an alternative sheet-to-steering arrangement or backup cockpit AP.


Glad to see you and everyone made it home safe. Congrats to all!

As to the 'robust' drive fallacy, the exact same thing happened to us on PacCup 2012 -- putting all the eggs into one hydraulic basket which failed at the race mid-point, due to operator error. Very tough hand steering so far.

AZ Sailor
07-09-2019, 12:51 PM
Glad to see you and everyone made it home safe. Congrats to all!

As to the 'robust' drive fallacy, the exact same thing happened to us on PacCup 2012 -- putting all the eggs into one hydraulic basket which failed at the race mid-point, due to operator error. Very tough hand steering so far.

In the run up to the 2018 SHTP a friend on the dock asked if I had a backup to my hydraulic below-deck AP. No, said I, smug in the knowledge that the Monitor wind vane would be my primary means of self-steering. I explained that I had used the Monitor successfully virtually every time off shore for more than a year, including for all of my qualifier in March.

Then in the race, of course, I did not set the vane after clearing the Gate, and instead let the AP steer the boat -- until it died during the SSB morning roll call on day 3. And only then did I realize that in all my supposedly vast experience with the Monitor I had always relied on the AP to steer while rigging the vane's steering lines to the the wheel adapter and setting the air paddle to the present course. So stooopid to have not thought of that until that moment. It is not so easy to set up the vane alone at sea with no AP.

Even after getting the Monitor in operation the first time there were several times over the first half of the race where I sorely missed the AP. The system I had used for connecting the steering lines to the wheel adapter worked quite well in typical So Cal conditions but wasn't up to the rigors of the trade winds and large seas, and had to be re-set a number of times. The worst episode was at 3 AM local time, mid ocean, when both steering lines unwrapped from the wheel adapter in 25+ wind and 10+ seas. Trying to hand steer in those conditions while simultaneously struggling to get the system back together was rather challenging.

Hats off to Bob J for enduring considerably worse.

My hydraulic AP has since been restored -- the computer had failed, and the factory was able to repair it for about $300. And my system for the Monitor's steering lines is now as close to bomb-proof as I think it can be. But I will not set off to cross an ocean again without a second AP on board.

AlanH
07-09-2019, 03:07 PM
Just to show how whacked out I was,
I'm still flabbergasted!

4513

Ouch.

That sucks. REALLY sucks.

brianb
07-10-2019, 12:34 AM
Big thanks to Tom as RC and keeping the cats all herding nicely together. Skip, if we think about it ahead of time, we should be able to set up a steaming video or at least a Skype connection for those who'd like to listen in. I'll see what I can do to facilitate this.

Hi Carliane, A note on streaming video or audio from past experience at SSS meetings, and a lot of biz meetings:
We will need a microphone or two that are fed into the streaming system.
More importantly a discipline will have to be established that all questions are taken via a mic., and failing that the question should be repeated by the host, into the mic.
All responses must follow the same protocol.
Side conversations, if near the mic. need to be inhibited.

If this equipment isn't available and the protocol can't be established then the streaming audience won't be able to tell what is going on.

sleddog
07-10-2019, 08:19 AM
I got cold at one point, not quite shivering but needing more layers. Everything was out of reach in the cabin and I didn't want to heave-to again. What could I do? The telescoping boat hook was within reach in the cockpit locker so I extended it and poked around in the pile of clothes below and speared another mid-layer. .

Hi BobJ

Congrats getting SURPRISE! home safe and sound! Several of us here at CBC watched your NWerly outbound route with interest, and tried to imagine conditions nearly closehauled. Your telescoping boathook clothing
retrieval method is giving all a good chuckle. :o

A couple of questions when you have time.

1. With new rigging, was the apparent cause of the slack lower rigging stretch? Starboard side only, or both sides?
2. What was your method of heaving to for rest? It appeared from the tracker SURPRISE! would drift downwind at 2-4 knots.
3. DAZZLER and I wonder if the AP issue could have been due to lowered voltage to AP.
4. Several Cal-40's with the newer rudders have "spin out" issues when the tiller is released. It is because the rudder design is overbalanced. A fine line between 2 finger control and having to concentrate on steering every moment..Do you think the short-chord keel was a proximate cause of not being able to let go of the tiller when hand steering. Or could rudder balance also have played a part?

Best from Capitola!

-sleddog

Philpott
07-10-2019, 09:05 AM
Hi Carliane, A note on streaming video or audio from past experience at SSS meetings, and a lot of biz meetings:
We will need a microphone or two that are fed into the streaming system.
More importantly a discipline will have to be established that all questions are taken via a mic., and failing that the question should be repeated by the host, into the mic.
All responses must follow the same protocol.
Side conversations, if near the mic. need to be inhibited.

If this equipment isn't available and the protocol can't be established then the streaming audience won't be able to tell what is going on.

Hahaha! Inhibit singlehanders? Iíll bring my little Lumix videocam on its tripod and my iphone. Just ordered new micro discs. No wifi needed. And might Mr Hedgehog still have access to that fancy hi tech equipment? Weíll have sense surround!

BobJ
07-10-2019, 09:45 AM
1. With new rigging, was the apparent cause of the slack lower rigging stretch? Starboard side only, or both sides?

Scott is on his way to race Pyewacket in the TP so I'm awaiting a reply. The lowers are relatively short so the amount of stretch is surprising - it appears to be about an inch on the port side and just a bit less on starboard. Do swages ever slip? Needless to say, I'm not going to merely tighten them and keep sailing, and will probably replace them (and maybe the mids) with rod, like the uppers.

2. What was your method of heaving to for rest? It appeared from the tracker SURPRISE! would drift downwind at 2-4 knots.

Heaving-to is a lifesaver. The boat calms down dramatically and other than the luffing main, becomes quiet and stable. Yes, you are drifting downwind at a rapid rate in that much wind (25-30k).

I come up to close-hauled and ease the main to start slowing down, then grind in the jib as flat as possible. While there's still enough way-on to tack, I tack over, ease the main more and when nearly stopped, lash the tiller fully to leeward. Getting the jib flat reduces the oscillation as the boat balances between the backed jib and the slight forward push from the back of the main. There's little wear-and-tear on the jib because it's not luffing, but it did cause the furling line to chafe on the bow pulpit - that's getting fixed. It's hard on the main in that much wind though. I'll take it over to North for inspection and repair.

3. DAZZLER and I wonder if the AP issue could have been due to lowered voltage to AP.

No. I replaced the house bank just before the race (it was 12 years old and wouldn't fully recharge). I monitored the voltage and SOC constantly and ran the engine as needed.

4. Several Cal-40's with the newer rudders have "spin out" issues when the tiller is released. It is because the rudder design is overbalanced. A fine line between 2 finger control and having to concentrate on steering every moment..Do you think the short-chord keel was a proximate cause of not being able to let go of the tiller when hand steering. Or could rudder balance also have played a part?

It probably played a part. It's funny because I already have the famous Schumacher rudder upgrade - it came with the boat!

5. Best from Capitola!

Best to you as well. I'm almost ready for you to come and sail the new-and-improved Surprise!

brianb
07-10-2019, 10:47 AM
Hey Bob,

I would love to look at the hydraulics on your boat and see what might be wrong. The Robertson setup is pretty bullet proof but anything will wear out. Keep us posted. BTW, before installing the Pelagic, if you are going to drive the below deck hydro, call me. That is a different setup than the above deck tiller drive.

Brian

BobJ
07-10-2019, 10:54 AM
Yes, please! I talked to a reputable shop yesterday and they're booked until November! I have a call into another one - skilled labor is hard to find these days.

For a 38'er the boat is fairly light (12,000#) and easy to balance, so I planned to mount the Pelagic in the normal way and drive the tiller. Except for one drive, my Pelagic is an early version. Should I buy a new one first?

sleddog
07-10-2019, 04:11 PM
Thiings are becoming slightly clearer on the waterfront. Good news from observers at KKMI: SEA WISDOM's rudder is intact and more or less in place having dropped downward approx. 4" There are going to be repairs to the upper bearing mount needed, which is where the steering failure began, possibly from whale strike. Also repairs to the lower bearing area and top of the skeg. Basically, the under deck, upper bearing support broke off and the rudder was held in place almost solely by the rudder tube and dislodged lower bearing.

This is fortunate indeed and attests to the strength of SEA WISDOM. In this circumstance, the lower rudder bearing can become levered out of position and dislodged, causing a leak into the boat. Around the World race boats often have a watertight bulkhead just forward of the rudder shafts to prevent the boat from sinking if a rudder is compromised. Or their rudders are transom mounted and either breakaway or kickup for such eventuality.

There are no obvious marks or damage apparent from whale contact, either on SEA WISDOM's keel or rudder. Hitting a sunfish (mola mola) can also cause loss of steering, and has done so in several Sydney2Hobart. Mola Mola can be as big as 8-10 feet across and weigh a ton.

4515

We look forward to Philpott's video interview with Will Lee, skipper of SEA WISDOM.

tboussie
07-10-2019, 07:24 PM
Update from the LongPac RC:

After getting some rest, Dan Willey on GALAXSEA studied his chart plotter and concluded that he mistakenly turned early, short of the 126 deg 40 min mark. Kudos to him for taking the self-reporting seriously and withdrawing from the race.

We are re-scoring the remaining finishers and will be posting the results on Jibeset as soon as possible. We will post the results here as well. More drama and excitement!


Tom

WBChristie
07-10-2019, 11:04 PM
Re: autopilot ďworn outĒ.. unless itís leaking oil from the cylinder, it probably just the brushes that need replaced. Those do wear out, but itís not a good reason to toss the whole thing, unless of course itís the shotgun approach! Sometimes worth it for peace of mind.
Congrats to all for making it back safely

sleddog
07-11-2019, 08:33 AM
Congrats to all for making it back safely

4517

Respect and hearty congratulations to Falk Meissner and his little ship SHARK ON BLUEGRASS for their Ironman performance and Clean Sweep in one of the more memorable races in SSS history. Final LongPac results posted: SHARK First-to-Finish, First in Class, and First Overall. https://www.jibeset.net/show.php?RR=JACKY_T00807790&DOC=r1&TYP=html

tboussie
07-11-2019, 09:42 AM
Update from the LongPac RC:

Apologies for not having labelled the original Jibeset results as "Preliminary". See below final scores. Indeed SHARK ON BLUEGRASS is first to finish, first in Division 2, and first overall. Fantastic job. More amazingly, after three days of racing, the five finishing boats were separated on corrected time by only 11 minutes. It could have been anybody's race.

tboussie
07-11-2019, 10:15 AM
Update from the LongPac RC:

Apologies for not having labelled the original Jibeset results as "Preliminary". See below final scores. Indeed SHARK ON BLUEGRASS is first to finish, first in Division 2, and first overall. Fantastic job. More amazingly, after three days of racing, the five finishing boats were separated on corrected time by only 11 minutes. It could have been anybody's race.


Without the excuse of sleep deprivation, I managed to confuse hours and minutes... Make that 11 hours (not minutes) separating the boats. A bit more reasonable. Only makes SOB's 5 hour corrected time advantage that much more impressive.

BobJ
07-11-2019, 10:41 AM
Indeed it was - congrat's Falk!

SharkOBluegrass
07-11-2019, 01:56 PM
Fellow Racers,
Thank you for warm words, I am naturally quite thrilled how this turned out. Thank you to the race committee for the time and effort to organize the race. Thank you and congrats to all fellow racers who ventured out there. Independent of the outcome, it takes courage, time, and money to even cross the starting line. Thanks to my family and friends that supported me roaming around on the ocean. (In what basically amounts to a 3/8" fiberglass zip-lock bag). Below are my impressions and learnings:

Fair Winds
Falk, S.O.B.
--------------------------------
2019 Long Pac on Shark on Bluegrass

This was the first time I took the Shark out for an overnight ocean race. I had done single-and double-handed Farallones, but the Long Pac is something different, especially with the heavy winds predicted out of the NW. Here are some of my impressions and learnings:

The first night was miserable. We were beating into about 15-20kn of wind. I was seasick, did not sleep enough the night before, and it was cold. I bore off to make it easier on the autopilot and retreated into the cabin. There, I learned that water dripping from the cabin top (from a deferred hardware re-bedding project) and the left-open hatch board makes a boat and everything in it very wet. I needed to figure out how to sleep. I had to get back out into the cockpit to tack to avoid a tanker. Back inside, my spinlock life vest inflated on the wet cabin sole.

The second day and night went much better. The wind was still around 15-20kn. I had dialed-in the boat, and caught up on 6hrs of sleep (30min increments). The container ship was friendly enough to change course when I checked in on VHF. At around 4 a.m. I reached 126’40” and turned around. All of the upwind leg I sailed with a 100% jib and a reefed main. The (tiller) auto pilot steered about 80% of the way to the turn mark and did a much better job at keeping a straight course at night than I do.

The third day had light winds, I shook out the reef, cleaned up, and slept a lot during the day to prepare for the last 100 miles of the race. I reefed the main again, closed the hatch board, and as the sun was setting the wind piped up to 22-24kn with 10ft swell from abeam. Immediately the boat started to plane at ~7kn. I saw 8-10-12+kn on the GPS (when I managed to have a look at it). I held on to the tiller and the jacklines, the spray was flying, and we rode the waves for 7 hours straight until the sun came back up again and the wind calmed down. Somewhat a surreal experience!

Around the Farallones the wind died. I was too tired (or lazy) to hoist the spin but managed to change to the Genoa. For most of the race Shark and Libra (Hey Gregory!) sailed only a few miles apart. I could see Libra on my AIS and/or her navigation lights at night. Sailing towards the Golden Gate Bridge, Libra was catching up with her spin flying. A bit thanks to the South Tower Devils wrapping Libras’ spin – Shark On Bluegrass managed to eke-out line honors 12 sec ahead of Libra, after 400nm and 3 days of racing!

Few of my learnings and takeaways (some of this might be obvious, as said, this was the first time I have done this)
• I sailed most of the race with a reefed main and the 100% jib. The Olson 25 weights 3,300lb and I stored the 70 lb 125Ah battery and the 70lb life raft near the mast foot. In this configuration, the Shark felt incredible stable and balanced even in the strong winds. Nothing broke. The tiller-pilot had not issue steering upwind in ~20kn (I did not try that in the 3rd night with 22-24kn from abeam).
• The boat is very wet with spray flying over the low cabin. I always needed to close the cabin top & hatch board. Once out in the cockpit, the door is closed and I needed to make sure I brought everything needed for the next few hours (food, cloth, drink, light etc.).
• Two proud moments of confirmed fore-sight. I bought a new (Raymarine tiller-) autopilot before the race. After 2 days of constant operation, my 15-year-old tiller pilot that came with the boat finally (and expectedly) gave up. RIP. I had made a point to bring a spare (non-inflating) life vest, which I wore with the tether once the spin-lock blew.
• I had an AIS receiver only, but now firmly believe that a AIS transponder should be a must. For the safety aspect to be seen by big ships, to make it easier to solve on which side to pass, for not running into each other when sailing relatively close to each other at night, and also for the camaraderie of seeing others close by out on the ocean.

-----------------------------

saildoc75
07-11-2019, 04:44 PM
HI All... Michael Chammout here, Mulan. Just logged on and read the posts.. amazing to hear others' accounts of this epic event. I saw a couple of questions regarding Mulan's issues, and my ribs!

This was my 1st adventure into the deep blue, and singlehanding it to boot.. Trepidation would be an understatement! I had done the 2 previous SSS Farallone races, and was pretty excited to take this on: qualify for SSS TransPac, maintain/improve (?) series standings, and mostly, see if I like it out there!

I've been gaining experience using the NKE Autopilot, recently upgraded with a working control head, and going through all the other boat systems to get Mulan seaworthy.. I thought. This has been a steep learning curve at my level of experience/knowledge. In the SSS Farallone Race I experienced AP failure due to low battery voltage and discovered spent batteries, so had recently installed 2 Group 27 AGM's, and a Voltek battery monitor.

The start was a bit hairy, as my 2nd jib halyard became detached from the mast base and was swinging around in the breeze trying to bean me until I just pulled it up to the shives... so much for thinking I had made everything perfect! Omen? Going out the Gate was great... Main reefed, #3 jib.. fun dueling and crossing tacks with Bob on Surprise! out to Pt. Bonita.. Then things got real... very real!

My strategy was to stay as N as I could manage, hoping to maybe get out ahead by the Farallones and take advantage of the predicted northerly wind twist, maybe then coursing a rhumb line to the Longitude turn around. This actually played out amazingly well... I basically landed on the island, and footed-off a bit to the perfect line... heading 270W at 35 degrees of apparent wind.. Wow, I was stoked, game on! However....

As everyone experienced.. the gnarly conditions were very intense, and new for me. Mulan is a sturdy girl, and we could handle beating into the heavy wind and swell.. it was the southern swell and resultant maytag thrashing that was creating the physical challenges. I've been prone to seasickness in the past, but doing much sailing the past years I've gotten pretty over it. No issues in the Farallone races, or occasional fishing trips.. as long as I stay above deck. I was very reticent to pre-medicating as I felt I needed all my wits, but did bring some oral Zofran tablets. Mostly hand steering at the helm I could see the occasional stacked-up southern monster swell coming outta the corner of my eye and deal with it, however, the few times I needed to go below to check the battery monitor or change clothes I couldn't see them coming and the boat would just spin to port, drop out from under me and I'd go flying. I've never experienced this before and didn't anticipate the 1st few times it happened... one particularly hard smack-down landed me badly on a wood ledge on the cabin floor and turns out I cracked 2 ribs on my left flank... friggin painful. Also, after 45 seconds going below I would become violently seasick... weird. Took 2 zofran, threw up.. took 2 more.. threw up again. This repeated 4 or 5 times and I finally just piled on several layers and resigned to staying on deck for the night, bringing water and snacks with me... Advil too. It was dusk at this point and the wind settled somewhat into the mid 20's.. which seemed pleasant by comparison!

I'd been tracking my new battery monitor, getting down to 12-ish volts.. started the engine and resumed hand-steering. after half hour, snuck a peek.. What? 11.8V's! Hmmm... shut down everything.. all electronics, music (yeah, I know!), and increased RPM's to 1500 for another half hour.. no change in charge. Little red charging light also not on.. dang! No bueno. Kicking myself... all those early, formative years with old beater cars, how many times when a battery goes does the alternator soon follow? then the starter? McFly... why didn't I replace the 12 year old stock alternator when I installed new high-charge-drawing fresh monster batteries??? I just didn't have it in me at that point to rip up the settee's and removing the engine cover looking for a loose wire or easy fix.. the wind was ramping up again, approaching 30, with accompanying sea state, and I'd throw up any time I was below more than a couple of minutes. I was also worried that my ribs may worsen, maybe a bruised kidney even, and the risk of becoming physically impaired in extreme sea conditions wasnt prudent.. no battery charging to run autopilot (or play music, haha).. time to head back.

Coming back through the washing machine was ok.. got some beautiful pics of the sun setting over the Farallones which are posted on my Bookface, and a whale spyglasses me.. holding about 10 feet out of the water for 4 or 5 seconds just eyeballing me from 30 yards away. He then followed me for 10 minutes, spouting every minute or so.. I think he like the blues music! Hit the CYC dock around 1 am, almost ran into the parked Tiburon Ferry I was so lulu at that point.

Follow up: Yes, fried alternator and 2 broken, extremely painful ribs... just today the pain seems to be just starting to get better, yaay. Hoisted the main for Friday beer can, 2 practice tacks and the boom broke at the connection to the mast gooseneck... glad I wasnt another 50 miles offshore when this happened! Sheesh Maybe reassessing the concept of running with scissors!

I'm out of town July 20-27th... am really hoping the awards meeting can be scheduled some time other than that week, would love to hear everyone's stories and honor those tough-as-nails comrades who stayed out there for several days in those conditions... whether they won, finished, or simply made it back in one piece! Lots to learn, indeed. :)

BobJ
07-14-2019, 11:45 AM
Brian solved Surprise!'s AP mystery inside of 30 seconds. We are enriched to have such talent in the SSS.

It's stretching to say the reason was the now-removed mizzen mast, but there was a connection. You'll have to attend the meeting to get the details.

I may bring a bottle of the elixir that enabled me to finish the race without dozing off at the helm. It can be a door prize for aspiring SHTP'ers with questionable autopilots.
.

WBChristie
07-14-2019, 07:21 PM
Brian solved Surprise!'s AP mystery inside of 30 seconds. We are enriched to have such talent in the SSS.

It's stretching to say the reason was the now-removed mizzen mast, but there was a connection. You'll have to attend the meeting to get the details.

I may bring a bottle of the elixir that enabled me to finish the race without dozing off at the helm. It can be a door prize for aspiring SHTP'ers with questionable autopilots.
.

Rudder position feedback linkage/and or sensor, not reliably reattached after its original mounting spot (mizzenmast) bracket was removed.........??

BobJ
07-14-2019, 07:33 PM
Creative guess, but no. Since the mizzen mast was mostly unrelated I'll post that part - it's too boring for the meeting anyway.

The tiller arm centers per the drive's manual were supposed to be 11.4". They were only 6" so the tiller arm could be cut off to clear the mizzen mast. The drive was working very hard to turn the rudder with such little leverage. I discovered this after Brian left. His discovery was more simple!

4523

WBChristie
07-14-2019, 08:46 PM
Creative guess, but no. Since the mizzen mast was mostly unrelated I'll post that part - it's too boring for the meeting anyway.

The tiller arm centers per the drive's manual were supposed to be 11.4". They were only 6" so the tiller arm could be cut off to clear the mizzen mast. The drive was working very hard to turn the rudder with such little leverage. I discovered this after Brian left. His discovery was more simple!

4523

Hmmmm! Key fell out??

No need to respond if you’re saving it... congrats on qualifying for the shtp and such a good effort. Looked like it was all over bar the shouting until the ap thing

BobJ
07-18-2019, 10:45 PM
I may bring a bottle of the elixir that enabled me to finish the race without dozing off at the helm. It can be a door prize for aspiring SHTP'ers with questionable autopilots.

On a warm, sleepy afternoon, one of my housemates drank the elixir intended for long periods of hand-steering. I won't be able to bring it to the meeting since I'm too cheap to buy another bottle:

4551

AlanH
07-19-2019, 03:43 PM
Oh Lord...I bought a bottle of that not knowing it was concentrate. I was drinking it on the way down the Bay on a hot afternoon and thought..."Damn this stuff is nasty". THEN I looked at the label.

brianb
07-19-2019, 06:19 PM
On a warm, sleepy afternoon, one of my housemates drank the elixir intended for long periods of hand-steering. I won't be able to bring it to the meeting since I'm too cheap to buy another bottle:

4551

Those with failed autopilot s in the SHTP have always related stories of elixir's that require a match to embib.

Philpott
07-22-2019, 10:57 AM
Is the awards meeting at Encinal?

pogen
07-22-2019, 11:19 AM
We will be meeting on Wednesday, July 24 at Encinal Yacht Club at 7:30, but try to arrive earlier than that for socializing and enjoying the BBQ of the junior sailing program.

Philpott
07-25-2019, 04:26 PM
Can't wait for the video? Don’t have time to watch the video? Read this and you can stand around with a beer in your hand sounding knowledgeable anyway.

“We have Falk [Meissner] on the line [conference call] and we want to acknowledge his clean sweep of the race. A fantastic job, amazing. First overall, by twelve seconds overall … first in his class and this is the second smallest boat…. and his first serious singlehanded ocean race.” Tom Boussie 2019 LongPac Race Chair

“We have a pretty twisted sense of fun around here.” Greg Ashby s/v Nightmare

“When I got just south of the Farallones it really ramped up. Both the amount of the wind and the sea state… It got real out there.”
Bob Johnston s/v Surprise!

“It wasn’t fun. That was the biggest problem.” George McKay s/v Skye

“It was probably some of the roughest conditions I’ve seen out there. This race is done so that everybody gets used to Gale Alley. This is a Gale Alley race that everybody goes through. So if you made it through it, then the Transpac is in your future. If you want it, you’re there. You’re capable. But this is what you’ve gotta go through to get back. Or to get out. It’s a grueling experience.” Dan Willey s/v Galaxsea

“This is my fifth LongPac. I definitely have sailing amnesia.” Randy Leisure s/v Tortuga

“Part of my [winning] strategy is to be the only multihull.” Cliff Shaw s/v Rainbow

“I think more people finished the Transpac than finished the LongPac. More people finish the Transpac because they have to. You’re half way … can’t bail. If I could’ve turned around [in the Transpac] I would’ve but I was 1000 miles out.” David Nabors s/v Temerity winner 2015 LongPac

Gamayun
07-25-2019, 09:54 PM
Great quotes :D :D

Philpott
07-27-2019, 06:03 PM
Someone once told me that my videos are too long, that people don't want to spend the time. It has also been suggested that attention spans have decreased due to too much video watching.

I have a hard time editing videos. It is too much responsibility to leave things out. Who am I to decide what might be important, what detail someone might find useful? So I just cut out the most egregious mumblings and leave the rest of the mumblings. They might be important.

https://vimeo.com/350520523