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Ragnar
04-25-2011, 05:57 PM
Hi Folks,

I know it's early, but I'm trying to figure out how to get my Tartan Ten back from Hawaii after the Race next year. I have no cradle, no trailer, and no time to sail her back. I've thought about selling her there, but I'm guessing selling a boat there is even harder than selling a boat here on the mainland. Any suggestions?

Slacker

BobJ
04-26-2011, 09:12 AM
Hey Slack,

Selling over there has been done successfully. The last one I know of was Alan, who had his SC27 sold before he arrived in Hanalei. He stripped off the offshore gear and sent that back home on one of the larger boats, hopped on the plane and came home. I suspect he'll see this before long and can give you more details.

Another possibility (done before) is to pay the shipping bill for one of the smaller boats and let its skipper sail your boat home. I know from our emails and exchanges on other boards that you know what you're doing and your boat is well fitted out. A skipper would be looking for that - it's a major undertaking to sail back. These arrangements usually get made under the Tree after the first group hug (ie not in advance), so you'd need to have a backup plan.

A skipper in 2006 (Paul) left his boat in Nawiliwili until the next season and then sailed it home - that might give you the flexibility to make it work.

I can tell you - you feel like Magellan or something after you've sailed home!

Harrier
04-26-2011, 10:16 AM
Like Magellan??? Good grief!

BobJ
04-26-2011, 11:34 AM
Like Magellan??? Good grief!

Marketing Ken - it's all marketing.

Wylieguy
04-26-2011, 11:21 PM
Might I remind everyone that Ferdinand ("Ferdie" to his friends) died when only halfway around the world. I know his name is connected with the first circumnavigation, but he only got as far as the Philippines. I don't know what that means when sailing back from Hawaii (notable last stop for another explorer, this one English), but only getting halfway doesn't seem like much of an option. It's like marketing a Chevy named Nova in S. America.
Pat

BobJ
04-27-2011, 07:31 AM
Okay Crowhurst then. You feel like Crowhurst.

This is a tough crowd.

Eyrie
04-27-2011, 08:32 AM
Say Bob,

Congratulations, you've been promoted out of the marketing department!
Here's your shovel, now fill in the holes you dug.

Harrier
04-27-2011, 09:04 AM
Always glad to see friends having fun! And getting halfway back from Hawaii doesn't usually work out too well. Had one guy I met in Hilo started back to mainland but Maydayed after about 200 miles north of the islands and was picked up by the US Navy (Shades of Space Cowboy?) having abandoned his 32ft (or so) boat. Said his spreaders were getting loose. Later tried to claim insurance "loss"....I'm pretty sure unsuccessfully.
At keast Ferdinand had a GPS named after him! Guess that was marketing...

Ragnar
04-27-2011, 10:25 AM
Guys dying, keels falling off, gear failures...you guys are filling me with confidence...

BobJ
04-27-2011, 10:34 AM
No worries Slack. I done got promoted. The next marketing director will talk about the Mai Tais with the little umbrellas in 'em.

tiger beetle
04-27-2011, 07:14 PM
Just don't hit the reef at the finish line.

There - feel better, Bob? I'd hate to think that the marketing department had gone uphill following your departure.

- rob/beetle

BobJ
04-27-2011, 08:48 PM
Aw Rob, you had go telling him about the reef. Sucker extends clear across Hanalei Bay so you can only get in at high tide with less draft than a T-10 has.

But back to the original question - I just remembered Adam pruned off one of his fleet and sold it over there last year - one of his turboed Folkboats I think. How did that work Adam?

ronnie simpson
04-27-2011, 09:30 PM
I think Adam did pretty well in offloading blue moon. If you look on Honolulu craigslist, the boats tend to be more expensive than here, so I think the potential exists to sell your boat there and do okay.

Ragnar
04-28-2011, 10:19 AM
Oh right, a reef! Cool!

I'm sure it won't be dark and I won't be tired when I get there...

BobJ
04-28-2011, 11:12 AM
Yeah, plus we used to have a requirement to carry a white hand flare in case you finished at night. Then you could be tired AND blind as you were approaching the reef, steering with one hand while holding a burning flare in the other hand. Rules, gotta love 'em.

Slack, are there any other PSSA skippers who are thinking about making the 2012 run? (Probably not after this thread!)

Ragnar
04-28-2011, 11:30 AM
It's still a little early, but haven't heard of anyone else yet. I'm working on a few...

Harrier
04-28-2011, 12:28 PM
Hardly anyone ever enters the SH Transpac from southern Kalifornia, if you look at percentages of entrants.
Why??? Not because of potential race problems, a teeny little reef well away from the actual finish line, sometimes severe weather right after the start, etc.

BECAUSE: It's a bitch to sail up to San Francisco Bay from down here!!! If you have a trailerable boat, you're in good shape. Otherwise, start north well before the race...expect delays.

The race is generally not particularly stressfull and it's great fun getting to know all the competitors (and many of their gorgeous ladies).

So y'all come (as we South Carolinians say).

Harrier
04-28-2011, 12:39 PM
Instead of saying "it's a bitch to sail up to SFO from SoCal", I should have said: "it's ALMOST always a bitch to..."

Ragnar
04-28-2011, 03:33 PM
Awesome!

Now I'm really excited.

Oceanslogic
04-28-2011, 07:14 PM
I just remembered Adam pruned off one of his fleet and sold it over there last year - one of his turboed Folkboats I think. How did that work Adam?[/QUOTE]

Hi Guys...
Selling Blue Moon over in Hawaii was not a problem at all...however if you are already considering selling the T10 once you get to Hawaii...I think Alan's "Ankle Biter" approach on setting up a buyer is the way to go if you go that route. I would also agree with Ronnie that boats seem to go for a decent amount of money over there...so ask for more and you may just get it :) Now as for the REEF...that thing is scary! BEWARE :)

Culebra
04-28-2011, 08:14 PM
After you pass the reef there's a nice little set to the left. If you leave up your chute you could catch a nice ride before you anchor.

Paul/Culebra

ronnie simpson
05-12-2011, 11:09 AM
Plan B has slowly become Plan A. Unless someone gives me money or a faster boat, it's looking like i'm racing 2012 on the Albin Cumulus. I am planning a short cruise after the race; most likely sailing to Palmyra and Kiritimati and then back to Hawaii and either offloading the boat, staying put, or just heading back to Hong Kong.

Any interest in a race to Palmyra? I am dead serious. Would be probably 5-10 days depending on boat and conditions... I'm sure it would be very unofficial in a Jester Challenge sort of way, but I think it sounds like a good time.

ronnie simpson
05-12-2011, 11:13 AM
[QUOTE=Harrier;4210]Hardly anyone ever enters the SH Transpac from southern Kalifornia, if you look at percentages of entrants.
Why??? Not because of potential race problems, a teeny little reef well away from the actual finish line, sometimes severe weather right after the start, etc.

BECAUSE: It's a bitch to sail up to San Francisco Bay from down here!!! If you have a trailerable boat, you're in good shape. Otherwise, start north well before the race...expect delays.
QUOTE]

Very true, Ken. I know several reputable delivery skippers based in SF Bay and in So Cal. Between those guys and the SHTP community, i'll bet some boats could get delivered up the coast if it made financial and logistical sense to any interested parties... I would hate to see people not race the SHTP because it was a hassle to get their boat up from So Cal...

tpatel
05-12-2011, 10:07 PM
I am planning on getting to San Francisco from San Diego in 2012 for the Shtp. Planning on getting there in March or April and leaving it there until I return a week before the race starts. Any of you SHTP veterans see a problem with my plans? Also planning on sailing it back to California (weather permitting).

Tushar

Phil MacFarlane
05-12-2011, 11:53 PM
Tushar,

No problem with your plan as long as you and your boat are both thoroughly ready to sail to Hawaii and back.
March and April can get breezy on the Cal. Coast so try to give your self some flexibility on getting her up here.
I don’t think there is any issue getting a slip around here these days, and there are lots of sailing resources.

Culebra
05-25-2011, 09:17 PM
Well, the General would know. So you have to pay heed to Harrier. But I also think Phil has it right... to elaborate, March does still deliver some big storms and seas, and you really do have to avoid the big ones. But if you time it right, you could ride southerly winds up the coast with a weak low pressure system, for a little while anyway. Later on in spring, the gradients along the coast often get huge, and I think that's what Harrier is referring to. Not as dangerous as the storms, but winds and seas are big and right on the nose. In any case, you're bound to get some weather for part of it. So I'd suggest studying the very few ports along the way, and plan for contingencies if the weather gets really bad. If the NWerlies are blowing hard, there's Cojo underneath Conception. There's Morro Bay, but the entrance could be awful in a storm. Monterey is good in any weather. Santa Cruz can be a dangerous entrance in a storm. Not well known, but very cool, Ano Nuevo is a nice hideout in NWerlies (anchor away from the kelp beds and don't hit the rock on the left). Pillar Pt is excellent (watch out for the reef, and enter by staying E of the reef at the S end if in a storm, not by going through the reef at the N end near Mavericks). And that's about it. If your boat is in good shape, it sounds like a fine adventure.

Paul/Culebra

Culebra
05-25-2011, 09:32 PM
Oh... one more thing. It's way colder than a person could possibly imagine during the night. Makes me cold just thinking about it.

Paul

jimb522
11-01-2011, 06:47 AM
I am considering the race, but have major issues with time, both in getting a new (to me) boat ready and stealing from myself (I lost the illusion that one is free to do as he pleases when self employed is really a delusion, for me at least) Because I would like to do the Baha Ha Ha before I die, I was considering bringing the boat to San Diego, which is about 2700 miles, as opposed to going back to San Francisco, decommissioning the boat (which would be extra expensive as it is a trimaran) and loading it on my trailer. Its probably to big to ship economically. Can anyone give me a reasonable amount of time it might take in late july/early august to sail back, the prevailing winds and conditions. My boat should be reasonably quick, but is not a dedicated racer like a Farrier 31.
At this point I cannot be considered probable entry, because I do not know how long its going to take me to get the boat operational, but if things come together I might be able to do it.
Jim
Jim

tiger beetle
11-01-2011, 08:49 AM
Can anyone give me a reasonable amount of time it might take in late july/early august to sail back, the prevailing winds and conditions. My boat should be reasonably quick, but is not a dedicated racer like a Farrier 31.
I would wager an average return time from Hanalei to San Francisco of 18-21 days, roughly. Add to that 2-3 days extra to arrive in San Diego as compared to San Francisco. At least that's been my experience. It depends to a degree on the amount of fuel carried to motor across the southern edge of the Pacific High, and where the High is positioned when you depart Hanalei.

- rob/beetle

Wylieguy
11-01-2011, 06:14 PM
I think you can add in Port San Louie (S. of Morro Bay) and San Simeon (N. of Morro Bay. Both are "doable" if Morro Bay's too rough - and it often is that time of year. Morro's entrance is narrow and shallow on both sides, so rollers just roll on across the entrance. Be sure to check with the Morro Bay CG if there's any question. Not a good approach in fog or darkness either without radar.

It's a long slog from the Morro Bay area to Monterey, with real shelter (without specific local knowledge).

Pat Broderick (been there, done that, survived in Loran C days) :eek:


So I'd suggest studying the very few ports along the way, and plan for contingencies if the weather gets really bad. If the NWerlies are blowing hard, there's Cojo underneath Conception. There's Morro Bay, but the entrance could be awful in a storm. Monterey is good in any weather. Santa Cruz can be a dangerous entrance in a storm. Not well known, but very cool, Ano Nuevo is a nice hideout in NWerlies (anchor away from the kelp beds and don't hit the rock on the left). Pillar Pt is excellent (watch out for the reef, and enter by staying E of the reef at the S end if in a storm, not by going through the reef at the N end near Mavericks). And that's about it. If your boat is in good shape, it sounds like a fine adventure.

Paul/Culebra

jimb522
11-04-2011, 07:03 PM
Rob
Thanks for the info. Can I assume that it will primarily light and variable? I don't have a pilot chart. The total time would be a deal breaker between the race and the return. If it becomes possible to put it together with the boat I would need to find some of the idle rich I guess, who have sailing skills, who might be able to deliver it for me.
Jim

tiger beetle
11-04-2011, 10:50 PM
Rob
Thanks for the info. Can I assume that it will primarily light and variable? I don't have a pilot chart.

It will be windy on departure from Hanalei, light going under or through the High, then windy again approaching coast in typical return conditions.

A typical departure from Hanalei will put you heading north or west of north in 15-20 knot tradewinds, sailing north for 500-700 miles - figure a week or a bit less of bashing north. Somewhere along that track you hope to intercept the Pacific High, and either tack east along under it in light air, or go a bit further north and motor east - usually around 38-40 degrees north latitude as you head east.

It's then a week of moving east through or beneath the High, and then you pop out into the north westerly breeze coming around the eastern edge of the High - and then you'd drop south to San Diego (assuming that's where you're headed).

So it's a reasonably lengthy passage from Hanalei to San Diego. It's also half of the run of doing the race!

- rob

talonf4u
11-08-2011, 07:17 PM
Can anyone clue me in on a reasonable expectation of what kind of $$ it takes to get a Moore 24 back from Hawaii on a cargo ship? I assume, of course, it's easier to ship it back than to find willing (and qualified!) souls to sail the boat back...

tiger beetle
11-08-2011, 08:21 PM
Can anyone clue me in on a reasonable expectation of what kind of $$ it takes to get a Moore 24 back from Hawaii on a cargo ship? I assume, of course, it's easier to ship it back than to find willing (and qualified!) souls to sail the boat back...

Give Matson a telephone call and see if they still do RO-RO (roll-on, roll-off) out of San Diego. This will give you a good baseline to work with, there are likely to be other group-rates set up as time goes by, but it's a bit early for that.

To do RO-RO, you will need a solid trailer, seriously strong tie-down straps, and plan to sail the boat over to Ala Wai after the race (usually not the most mellow of trips).

- rob/beetle

Wylieguy
11-09-2011, 05:19 PM
My understanding is that MATSON ships out of Oakland and PASHA ships out of San Diego. I know Matson calls at Kuaii, but I'm not sure about PASHA. PASHA does offer inter island boat shipping, but I'm not sure how that works.

Usually both companies offer a "special" during the PacCup/SSS TransPac year. The "special" usually includes shipping your empty trailer over, shipping the boat/trailer combo back - with no extra fee for the length of the mast. Your fee is based on the "box" formed by the length/width/height of the trailer/boat combo. You pay by the cubic footage of that package rather than the weight.

Both companies run bi-weekly service and each has one ship with roll on-roll off capabilities. That means if you can ship your trailer about a week prior to the race, it will be waiting for you. If you're lucky, you can get your boat packed up and on the trailer and catch the boat back without having to wait 2 weeks and pay storage fees over there.

You will pay yard fees for hauling/pulling the mast/etc. You will probably pay some sort of fee for hauling your trailer/boat from the boatyard to the shipping facility. In Honolulu that's about $550 + $100 for the yard to hook your trailer onto the towing truck - all on top of the other yard fees.

For a 30' Wyliecat, Matson charged about $4500 for shipping. The yard/towing fees in Honolulu added close to another $2000 to that cost. You might avoid excessive towing fees by renting a pickup, but remember you'll be under tremendous time pressures to meet deadlines without the resources you might have at home. You might even be able to find a launch ramp and haul your boat that way - a few of the 24-27 foot boats managed that in last year's PacCup. The trick was that you had to be able to get the mast down without a crane and get the trailer deep enough for the keel. It was hairy/scary! It took almost 20 people under an Express 27 to "hump" it into position on the trailer after the pull out.

Matson's website is <www.matson.com> and Pasha's <pashahawaii.com>

Pat Broderick

jimb522
11-13-2011, 07:33 AM
Rob,
I thought I sent this yesterday, but I can't find it on the forum, so maybe I hit delete instead of send

As I appreciate your preferred route of flight, to go from hanelei to san diego, I would sail north, or west of north, from 11 degrees south of San Diego to 6 degrees north of San Diego, then east for a week, and then back south 6 degrees to San Diego. I do not question that conventional wisdom (apparently), but I am curious as to what sea monster lives on the rhumb line course, that makes it so I'll-advised. What wind or sea conditions are on the rhumb line?
Thanks
Jim

P.s. If I went that way would I be like Charlie and the mta (see kingston trio if not old enough to remember).

Wylieguy
11-13-2011, 05:37 PM
Mostly the ocean directly between California and Hawaii is occupied by the Pacific High during the Summer months - at least in a normal Summer. The reason the Spanish could sail their Manila galleons to and from Mexico for nearly 200 years and never discover Hawaii is that they knew about the high. The route to Manila went South of Hawaii and the return route to N. America went North - sort of along 45º North. Then they coasted down along Oregon, California, Baja California, and to Mexico, sometimes stopping in protected anchorages - like Drake's Bay where the bones of a Manila galleon remain to this day. Captain Cook was surprised when he came upon the Hawaiian Islands in 1778 - and unfortunately for him when he returned a year later he never left the place. The best way to "navigate" a direct route is on the deck of a Matson cargo ship.
Pat B.

jimb522
11-14-2011, 05:25 AM
I assumed that would probably be the answer. Too bad my boat is not a candidate for a berth on Matson. Thanks.
Jim

Wylieguy
11-14-2011, 11:00 AM
Jim, Don't know what your boat is, but Matson's hauled them home as small as 20' and I know as large as a Passport 40.
Pat B.

Pogo2USA806
04-06-2012, 04:01 PM
does anyone has a name at Matson? someone to talk to?

BobJ
04-06-2012, 04:28 PM
Jerome, check on the Pacific Cup website. There may be a package deal going for both races. Other than that no, I don't have a contact name. Rob?

Pogo2USA806
04-27-2012, 07:47 AM
Thank you. I have contacted both freight company. I have chosen Pasha. After the race, I am probably have to quickly sail to Honolulu and have the boat taken out of the water...can't stay too long...unfortunately.

Ragnar
04-27-2012, 01:53 PM
Thank you. I have contacted both freight company. I have chosen Pasha. After the race, I am probably have to quickly sail to Honolulu and have the boat taken out of the water...can't stay too long...unfortunately.

Hopefully you won't be gone by the time I get there!

Slacker

Samuel Burns
04-27-2012, 05:00 PM
Ragnar & others looking for a way back:

Brian Caldwell [ bjcaldwell.com ] is experienced delivery skipper who will be in Pacific post-delivery to Vanuatu; besides a delivery to mainland USA he might also be able to take your boat to a broker in Australia where it would fetch a better price than in HI...........

" New post on BJ Caldwell

One day at a time…
by bjcaldwell.com

Just a day ago I was lamenting the lack of upcoming yacht deliveries. However it now appears one that had been simmering will happen from July onwards of a boat from the US to Vanuatu. So this would be the 2nd straight year I'll have taken a boat from the US to the South Pacific / Australia along with the high potential Linda and I sail our S&S 34's from the US to Australia before cyclone season come mid-November as well..."


Hi Folks,

I know it's early, but I'm trying to figure out how to get my Tartan Ten back from Hawaii after the Race next year. I have no cradle, no trailer, and no time to sail her back. I've thought about selling her there, but I'm guessing selling a boat there is even harder than selling a boat here on the mainland. Any suggestions?

Slacker

ronnie simpson
04-29-2012, 10:50 AM
I have teamed up with another sailor who has her Captain's license and we are looking to knock out some deliveries. It looks like we may have a delivery lined up, returning from Pac Cup. We are both young with low overhead and can therefore be negotiable on rates. We each have about 20,000 miles at sea.

Full CV's available upon request

ronnie simpson
04-29-2012, 10:52 AM
and as far as BJ Caldwell is concerned. He was my watch-mate on TRANSPAC last year on the 1D35. That guy is one of the best sailors and delivery skippers i've ever met. Adam Correa sailed with him from Honolulu to Australia last year as well. BJ is very good but I believe he's already booked for a couple of deliveries in the Pacific next summer.