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Thread: Sailing Tomorrow

  1. #391
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Santa Rosa
    Posts
    626

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    About 3 flares. For about $80 bucks you can buy one of the CG approved electronic "flares" -- and at the cost of 2 or 3 "D" or "C" cells per year meet the requirement. Okay, I agree they don't really replace a flare for getting rescued, but they meet the requirement; we all know that expired flares continue to blaze for years past their deadlines, so keep keeping those in the flare/ditch bag for "real use." I'll bet a quick survey of nearby berth holders would net an armful of recently expired flares since no one knows how to legally dispose of them, even though they'll fire off for a long time. I know that for us offshore racers the electronic devices don't meet OYRA's requirement.

  2. #392
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    11

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    I’ve gotten rid of expired flares at Waste Management hazardous waste drop off sites in Alameda County - no charge.

    Sam

  3. #393
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,156

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    Cliff Shaw is leaving the Bay aboard s/v Rainbow on Saturday, under the Bridge at approximately noon as the ebb starts.

    Rainbow finishes the 2019 LongPac: https://vimeo.com/346774036

    Where is he going? To French Polynesia. Again. And to the Cook Islands. In case anyone would like to accompany him out. I'm sailing over to Emeryville Friday to say goodbye. Maybe take some cookies.

  4. #394
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    37.205346,-121.963398
    Posts
    780

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    I wonder if Cliff has his taxes done ?

  5. #395
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,579

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    Ha! But knowing Cliff, I'll bet he filed in February.

    I used to file in February. Then I retired. Now ours aren't done yet and we're going camping over the 15th. I should call my former boss and ask how tax season is going.

  6. #396
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,156

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    Here's Cliff's tracker: share.garmin.com\CliffordShaw
    Case sensitive; click on "View all Tracks" at the upper right hand corner
    Last time he was in Moorea he bought a sim card and it worked in his flip phone. Which he still uses.
    Taxes paid February 20
    Yes on the cookies. Chocolate chip.
    Last edited by Philpott; 04-11-2022 at 03:43 PM.

  7. #397
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    46

    Default Yep, heading South again

    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    Cliff Shaw is leaving the Bay aboard s/v Rainbow on Saturday, under the Bridge at approximately noon as the ebb starts.

    Rainbow finishes the 2019 LongPac: https://vimeo.com/346774036

    Where is he going? To French Polynesia. Again. And to the Cook Islands. In case anyone would like to accompany him out. I'm sailing over to Emeryville Friday to say goodbye. Maybe take some cookies.
    Almost ready to go! Two little corrections: -My InReach tracker is at share.garmin.com/CliffordShaw ( the slash was shown backwards).
    -I'll depart Emeryville at noon this Saturday, reaching the Bridge at about 1:30pm for slack water then ebb.

    Taxes?? New sails, two new Pelagic APs and a custom 16' x 4' carbon/foam aft deck -- I got no money left for stinking taxes!! That's why I'm heading South -- they'll never catch me!

    Regarding the sails though: Has anyone heard of deliberately increasing the main roach to a point it will overlap the backstay by several inches? North wanted to give me some roach instead of the straight leech all three prior mains had. The first time I jibed, the top two battens hit so hard it shook the whole rig, and they dragged and hung up tacking also. I had it cut down twice on the assumption one never wants to have the sail slap the backstay, but it still overlaps by an inch unless the main is strapped down hard. As the boom lifts during a tack or jibe, and when trimmed easy in light air up wind, the battens still hang up. Slapping is reduced now though with less overlap. At this point I was told told the slapping never was a problem, the sail is designed and built to take that abuse (and indeed there is what appears to be a very durable and slippery extra patch over the end of the full battens), and the rig won't be hurt by the really significant sudden bang/shaking. Am I as out of date about mainsails and backstays as my trusty flip phone is about modern communications?

  8. #398
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    37.205346,-121.963398
    Posts
    780

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rainbow View Post
    Has anyone heard of deliberately increasing the main roach to a point it will overlap the backstay by several inches? North wanted to give me some roach instead of the straight leech all three prior mains had. The first time I jibed, the top two battens hit so hard it shook the whole rig, and they dragged and hung up tacking also. I had it cut down twice on the assumption one never wants to have the sail slap the backstay, but it still overlaps by an inch unless the main is strapped down hard. As the boom lifts during a tack or jibe, and when trimmed easy in light air up wind, the battens still hang up. Slapping is reduced now though with less overlap. At this point I was told told the slapping never was a problem, the sail is designed and built to take that abuse (and indeed there is what appears to be a very durable and slippery extra patch over the end of the full battens), and the rig won't be hurt by the really significant sudden bang/shaking. Am I as out of date about mainsails and backstays as my trusty flip phone is about modern communications?
    Increasing the roach deliberately is common on racing boats, and doing something like putting a fiberglass strut at the mast head that pulls the back stay away from the sail when you ease back stay tension is common (the Aussie's likely has assigned a name to this device, like "golly-slapper", Glenn likely knows). Your boat doesn't have the luxury of doing that . I had a sail on a previous boat that was increased a touch in roach, the result was you had to pull the backstay back a bit in lighter air to get a tack to complete properly. The Figaro II has just such an issue with it's mainsail. I would watch those batten tips for wear and tear.


    Brian
    Last edited by brianb; 04-12-2022 at 04:09 PM.

  9. #399
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    46

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    Quote Originally Posted by brianb View Post
    Increasing the roach deliberately is common on racing boats, and doing something like putting a fiberglass strut at the mast head that pulls the back stay away from the sail when you ease back stay tension is common (the Aussie's likely has assigned a name to this device, like "golly-slapper", Glenn likely knows). Your boat doesn't have the luxury of doing that . I had a sail on a previous boat that was increased a touch in roach, the result was you had to pull the backstay back a bit in lighter air to get a tack to complete properly. The Figaro II has just such an issue with it's mainsail. I would watch those batten tips for wear and tear.


    Brian
    Thanks Brian. I wondered if it might be a racing innovation. Not really what I want on a short handed cruiser, though I did like the feel of a little more power in the main. It's too late to fix now so I'll sail with the cunningham set to reduce the luff 2" to keep the battens clear and get it re-cut again when I get back. Fair winds to all and have a good season on the Bay and offshore. Cliff

  10. #400
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    105

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    Hi Cliff,

    All the best to you on your offshore adventure to the South Pacific on Rainbow. I would see you off under the Gate but it's kind of a long way from San Diego. I look forward to following your tracker. Fair winds.

    DolfinBill

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