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Thread: Marina recommendations

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Berkeley Marina
    Posts
    136

    Default Marina recommendations

    So let's say you're a singlehander with a 27' Cal, less-than-great tight-quarters sailing skills, and a clumsy, unreliable outboard setup that, despite way too much dinero spent on parts and mechanics, likes to quit just as you're entering the labyrinthine fairway that leads to an upwind slip on E dock at Marina Village and usually finds you instead barely making it to the pumpout dock after much cursing, praying, and sculling -- or avoiding Murphy, O'Toole, and Finagle altogether and luffing into the guest dock so you can play the motor gamble later that night when wind isn't a factor.

    Do you:
    (1) Spend $10k to re-power a $5k boat.
    (2) Man up, get more fenders, check your insurance policy, and go in with full canvas every time. Naked.
    (3) Say "forget the estuary!" and move to an outer, downwind slip in sunny Richmond?
    (4) Same for Sausalito --- if they still have marinas that like small boats. Last time I checked there weren't many.
    (5) Just get a downwind, outer slip anywhere you can and sail in/out. It isn't difficult. Mongo, General Trees, and presumably others made it work.

    In other words, for those that have been around the bay a while, what are some of the more idiot-proof marinas? Big fairways, plan-B-worthy guest docks, deep water, and reasonable tacking room, preferably within, say, a two hour sail of the slot.
    Last edited by Lanikai; 04-12-2015 at 08:34 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Fremont, CA
    Posts
    124

    Default

    Richmond Yacht Club is good for that. I think upwind slip is best for sail in/out. Also, I think many sail in/out of Berkeley Marina.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,361

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lanikai View Post
    So let's say you're a singlehander with a 27' Cal, less-than-great tight-quarters sailing skills, and a clumsy, unreliable outboard setup that, despite way too much dinero spent on parts and mechanics, likes to quit just as you're entering the labyrinthine fairway that leads to an upwind slip on E dock at Marina Village and usually finds you instead barely making it to the pumpout dock after much cursing, praying, and sculling -- or avoiding Murphy, O'Toole, and Finagle altogether and luffing into the guest dock so you can play the motor gamble later that night when wind isn't a factor.

    Do you:
    (1) Spend $10k to re-power a $5k boat.
    (2) Man up, get more fenders, check your insurance policy, and go in with full canvas every time. Naked.
    (3) Say "forget the estuary!" and move to an outer, downwind slip in sunny Richmond?
    (4) Same for Sausalito --- if they still have marinas that like small boats. Last time I checked there weren't many.
    (5) Just get a downwind, outer slip anywhere you can and sail in/out. It isn't difficult. Mongo, General Trees, and presumably others made it work.

    In other words, for those that have been around the bay a while, what are some of the more idiot-proof marinas? Big fairways, plan-B-worthy guest docks, deep water, and reasonable tacking room, preferably within, say, a two hour sail of the slot.
    When I had Dura Mater the Cal 20 I had an outboard engine. It was an old two stroke and it was incredibly reliable until one day it wasn't. When I bought Dura Mater the Cal 2-27 people said, "Oh, an inboard diesel. You're going to love that! You'll never have to lean out over the transom in high wind to start the engine".

    It's nice not to have to lean over the transom of the boat in high wind in order to start the engine. But seriously, in high wind, who starts the engine? It's a sailboat.

    I've always sailed into the Berkeley marina. Except that time I motored in after my rigging came down. But I digress.

    Half a dozen times I've sailed into Berkeley when my engine has failed. When that happened I either drifted in with the tide or, when the wind was really high, I tied up to an end dock and called the harbormaster's office to let them know I would collect Dura Mater the next day. They're good about it. They'd rather have me tie up on an end dock than crash into boats on my way in. For awhile there I called so often that it bored them: "Oh yeah. Again, huh? Too bad."

    After breaking down in various parts of the bay and offshore I have replaced the starter, glow plugs, ignition switch, fuel injectors, water pump, the air filter and the exhaust system. I confess that it is nice to have a reliable engine. Finally. You could buy a really nice new outboard for way less than I've spent on my Universal M15.

    The fairways are big and generous at Berkeley marina. From the slot, if there is no wind and your engine dies, you can usually either run in or wait for the flood and float home to Berkeley.

    Last Thursday I sailed on the Circle in 9 knots of crisp wind. On the way back in two beautiful women in blue and pink saris waved to me as I passed them on the pier. After I hosed off Dura Mater I passed an ongoing construction project on the Berkeley Yacht Club pier, cordoned off with pilfered City of Piedmont traffic cones. On the way to my car I stopped by the dumpster and picked up a paperback entitled "Swedenborg, Life and Teaching". Seriously. Berkeley. What's not to love?
    Last edited by Philpott; 04-12-2015 at 10:10 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Berkeley Marina
    Posts
    136

    Default

    I guess I have the windedness of slips confused. Downwind to me means on the leeward side of the pier/dock. Like at Santana Row on Alameda Marina, where I could run down the estuary, drop the jib by the Grand Ave ramp, bang a right into the dock 5 fairway, and cruise a de-powered beam reach to the slip and then a quick hard right up into it. Nothin' to it. Fairway is probably 30' wide.
    At Marina Village, it would be harden up, then harden up more and quickly, then ease off, then gybe, then douse inside a boat length, then port 90 degrees with enough momentum to get 50 yards across the wind but no more, and then a quick turn downwind inside the maaaybe 30' fairway slip and stop. I guess I'll try it on an odd weekday when no one is around to see me hit their very expensive boat. Now, sailing out of the slip...not yet.
    A new event for the SSS schedule: sail in and out of the scariest slip of the SSS roster without breaking anything. Instead of T shirts we get gelcoat repair paste. Doublehanders can participate but crew has to be blindfolded.

    Oh, yeah, almost, forgot Berzerkley, too. Slips can't get more upwind-downwind than that, huh? And all that wind, just right there, and legions of co-ed crew to be poached from the Cal Sailing Club. There's an idea.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,031

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    I really like Marina Village and have had my boat there twice over the years, but never on the inside section for the reasons you describe.

    Yes, an upwind slip means the boat is pointed upwind when docked. Much preferred if you like to sail in/out of your slip.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    86

    Default

    for small boats in sausalito - check out Sausalito shipyard and Marina. ~$250 a month. I have had my boat there for a year and really like the liveaboards and the general vibe.

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