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Thread: Singlehanded Farallones 2015

  1. #31
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    It's still early for a forecast but whatever units you use, it's looking velly velly nice for a little sail to the stinky rocks on Saturday.

    I hope this holds: (At the rocks) NW wind 11 to 16 kt. Mostly cloudy. Mixed swell...WNW 5 to 6 ft and SSW 2 ft. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft.

    So sign up already!

  2. #32
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    Novice question: I have a cutter rig with (of course) a regular 100% jib up front and a smaller staysail behind it. ***I am intending to enter the Non-Spin Division.*** My rating is for a cutter rig. With respect to the rules, under what circumstances can I use the various sail combinations? Examples: 1) During light winds can I fly main and both jib and staysail together?; 2) When it's blowing like stink, can I switch over to just main and staysail? 3) Can I pole out my jib downwind (wing-on-wing, no staysail)? I know that it's explicit that I cannot pole out twins (which I don't have yet anyway) in the non-spin division.

    Is there a rule simply that I "cannot use both staysail and jib simultaneously" in non-spin?

  3. #33
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    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    I'm pretty sure you are allowed to do all of the above. Poled-out jibs are allowed in the NOR, though not in the RRS - we make an exception. See the SSS NOR/SSI, section 1.c.ii.

  4. #34
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    1.c.ii. allows "Twin headsails set on two poles for downwind sailing. This modifies RRS 50.2." but then it says "In the non-spinnaker division only one head sail may be used at a time."

    In the context I'm guessing the latter only applies downwind but I see the confusion. Can we get Smokester a clarification? Randy (Westsail 32 Tortuga) often races with both jib and stays'l but in a spinnaker division. I think Dan (Galaxsea) does too.
    Last edited by BobJ; 05-20-2015 at 12:15 PM.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by P. Broderick - Elaine View Post
    Right about OYRA pre-race MER inspections. They're calling random boats for post-race MER inspections. I think it's up to individual race authorities to determine whether they want pre/post/no MER inspections for ocean races. As far as I know the Spinnaker Cup isn't inspecting, for instance. I don't think the SSS is requiring inspections for the Farallones????
    The decision is always the Organizing Authority as they define in NOR/SI.

    DHF always had a right to inspect in the SI. Violations are DSQ wo Appeal.*
    NCORC initially recommended full inspections prior to race.
    DHF continued with the right to do inspections and attempted a compromise drive by random inspection post finish- didn't work
    NCORC dropped the recommendation for inspection.
    DHF continues with right to do inspections and experimented this year with photo remote email inspections which show promise.

    cheers
    bob

    * This was discussed in NCORC and would apparently violate the rules if USS sanctioned race
    Last edited by K38Bob; 05-20-2015 at 05:47 PM.

  6. #36
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    Ahoy! Yes I use my staysail on Tortuga all the time. I don't believe it is considered a 2nd jib and I use it mostly upwind and just off the wind. Anything deeper and it gets in the way of the jib. Cheers
    Randy W32 Tortuga

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Smokester View Post
    Novice question: I have a cutter rig with (of course) a regular 100% jib up front and a smaller staysail behind it. ***I am intending to enter the Non-Spin Division.*** My rating is for a cutter rig. With respect to the rules, under what circumstances can I use the various sail combinations? Examples: 1) During light winds can I fly main and both jib and staysail together?; 2) When it's blowing like stink, can I switch over to just main and staysail? 3) Can I pole out my jib downwind (wing-on-wing, no staysail)? I know that it's explicit that I cannot pole out twins (which I don't have yet anyway) in the non-spin division.

    Is there a rule simply that I "cannot use both staysail and jib simultaneously" in non-spin?
    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    1.c.ii. allows "Twin headsails set on two poles for downwind sailing. This modifies RRS 50.2." but then it says "In the non-spinnaker division only one head sail may be used at a time."

    In the context I'm guessing the latter only applies downwind but I see the confusion. Can we get Smokester a clarification? Randy (Westsail 32 Tortuga) often races with both jib and stays'l but in a spinnaker division. I think Dan (Galaxsea) does too.
    Thank you for the replies. I asked around at the skippers' meeting last night. Here is the result.

    The confounding statement "...In the non-spinnaker division only one head sail may be used at a time..." applies to twin jibs only. A cutter is rated as a cutter, so using the staysail and jib together allows it to be sailed to its rating as intended. Protests based on a literal interpretation of the confounding statement have not been successful.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Smokester View Post
    Thank you for the replies. I asked around at the skippers' meeting last night. Here is the result.

    The confounding statement "...In the non-spinnaker division only one head sail may be used at a time..." applies to twin jibs only. A cutter is rated as a cutter, so using the staysail and jib together allows it to be sailed to its rating as intended. Protests based on a literal interpretation of the confounding statement have not been successful.
    Nice to meet you and glad it worked out for you.

  9. #39
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    Looks like forecasts for Saturday afternoon have moved from pleasant to 'interesting'.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunol View Post
    Looks like forecasts for Saturday afternoon have moved from pleasant to 'interesting'.
    Yes, I'm watching that forecast change every 12 hours, especially the "4-7 ft nw swell 7 to 9 ft at 8 seconds". Huh?! The Big Fat Baby in me turned to my Go-To Guy, Bob Johnston. Here is his advice:

    Well first, that's an average for the whole day and 15-25 is a broad range. The last time I looked it was going to be more like high teens out at the Farallones = a piece o'cake. It is forecast to get windier at the end of the day, with gusts as high as 31 knots. Therefore if you're not around the island by mid-afternoon you might want to head back, but see how it's going and how you're feeling.

    On the way out, once the breeze picks up keep your sails flat - plenty of halyard tension, cunningham and outhaul on the main, halyard and sheet on the jib (grind it in flat). If you're still heeling too much you can reef of course, and also try to move the jib leads aft to open up the jib's leech a bit while keeping the foot tight.

    On the way back you can ease everything some. A looser vang will help to keep you from broaching and of course, ease the mainsheet well out if it's getting broachy. If the jib is a little on the tight side (overtrimmed) it will hold your bow down better coming back, also reducing the tendency to broach. If you have an outboard jib lead (like out to the rail) use that - it will also want to led a little farther forward. This will keep the top of the sail from luffing when you ease it out on the reach home.

    If that forecast (below) proves correct and the wave period is that short, it's going to be a bit sloppy. Remember though - just close up the companionway and turn around and it becomes more manageable/comfortable coming back. So keep going until you're not having fun anymore and then turn around. Hopefully that will be at the island!

    Just a reminder on the rounding: You see the knob on the NE corner of the island from way off so it's pretty easy to plan to pass it at a seamanlike distance. Once you do that, don't bear off - hold a heading of 255 Mag (270 True) i.e. due West, even though the island tapers off to the south as you proceed along the north side. Watch for breakers off your STARBOARD bow. If you see any big ones, tack over and get farther North. Then don't bear away around the west end of the island until you're almost past it. Simply said - sail due West across the top, don't cut the corner.

    Then once around and in the lee of the island (on the south side), use the head and get everything out in the cockpit you're going to want during the trip home. Then relax and enjoy the ride. It's nice to know the bearing back to the Gate since you won't be able to see it until you get closer in. Don't forget to turn on your running lights (I do it early), call in your approach to the finish and jot down your finish time in case the R/C misses it.

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