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Thread: seasickness

  1. #11
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    Jan 2013
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    Berkeley Marina
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    I fortunately haven't had to deal with this yet (haven't been far out the gate yet and all my other sailing was on the placid waters of the east coast), but almost looking forward to it! Then I'll be a genuine ocean-going sailor.
    In any case, during one of the Strictly Sail seminars -- " are you prepared to go offshore? ", or something like that -- either the speaker or an audience member (can't remember) swore by this formula which he uses when taking new sailors offshore:
    moderate dinner, then for breakfast the morning of your ocean adventure: 1 entire sleeve of saltine crackers and a liter(?) of water. No more, no less. Must finish it before you're allowed on the boat. He tells the crew to meet him at the best breakfast place in the city, and that he's picking up the tab (to prevent cheaters from filling up on greasy stuff beforehand). Then they all stand outside in their foulies eating saltines and watch jealously as people enjoy their omelettes and pancakes.
    Use at own risk.
    Last edited by Lanikai; 05-05-2015 at 12:10 PM.

  2. #12
    pogen's Avatar
    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    I've often seen people hurling over the side while wearing one of those Scope patches. Just sayin'.

    That said, heavy greasy food seems to be the worst. I used to fill the kids up on donuts in the car on the way to the boat, or a big breakfast at Ole's , but that is not really the best thing if the person is marginal for motion sickness in the first place. The crackers and water idea seems good. I can never get my sick crew to drink ginger beer or anything, a lot of people don't like the taste.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
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    156

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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    They all have side effects. Pick your poison.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV and Alameda, CA
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    111

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    Pseudoephedrine and Promethazine, compounded for NASA. Different half lives, so may have to repeat the pseudoephedrine sooner. Promethazine alone will make you drowsy. Scopalamine patch worked for me and my nephew on last Long Pac, but I had drowsiness and visual hallucinations (could have been from the concussion when I was tossed across the cockpit I suppose). As a medical student many years ago at Duke, a local physician was famous for loading up patients in labor on Scopalamine and sending them to Duke to deliver while acting very bizzare. YMMV.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
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    114

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    For me, sitting on the stern and looking forward seems to help a lot.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    239

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    For short term (4 hours or so) swallowing four 550mg ginger tablets with a bottle of water helps me. These can be found in the health food section of most supermarkets.

    http://www.vitacost.com/natures-way-...FVGTfgodBoMA6w

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    193

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    We use all forms of ginger: candied, chocolate covered (back at Trader Joes), hand made 3 ginger molasses cookies, ginger ale (Canada dry is our favorite, some like Vernors). Not those Chewy Candies.

  8. #18
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    Sep 2007
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    3,033

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    I found a little bag of ginger cookies in Rags' cockpit the morning of our Pacific Cup start. I think Bea had something to do with that.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    119

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    Keep in mind when looking towards the horizon that the goal is to look towards the approaching waves. One of the reasons you get sick more often down below is your body and mind are not in sync. Your body feels motion your mind isn't seeing. By looking at the oncoming waves your mind gets in sync with motion your body feels moments later.
    Life is not a dress rehearsal.

    Bermuda 1-2 on a Schumacher 28

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    I noticed that Skip remained silent on the whole seasickness issue, until one day he mentioned that he, too, had tried the wristband. It was fine until it got wet, when he felt his wrist getting electrocuted. Ah. Fine until it gets wet. That explains its success last week when I wore it aboard the Sanctuary Cruise out of Moss Landing. We motored out to a pod of 9 whales. They swam and blew and dove all around our boat, and then they dove under it. They kept coming back. I think they liked us! Then we were in the middle of hundreds of dolphins! It was very very cool. The wristwatch worked fine. I also took bonine for days beforehand, and the wind was only about 7 knots. This was not a randomized study or anything. hahaha. I'll try it again on the way to Drakes Bay. Oh, dear Neptune, please give us wind.

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