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Thread: seasickness

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Default seasickness

    Every time I go offshore I throw up. Afterwards I feel fine, but it's an icky feeling and it enervates me until the oatmeal comes up and over the leeward side. I've tried bonine and dramamine and scopalomine patches. I've tried all three at once. Nothing works. So I broke down and bought a Reliefband. In the spirit of the SSS I will self monitor and report back.

  2. #2
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    Jan 2015
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    San Francisco Bay
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    Default

    Have you tries Sturgeron?

  3. #3
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    Feb 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    Every time I go offshore I throw up. Afterwards I feel fine, but it's an icky feeling and it enervates me until the oatmeal comes up and over the leeward side. I've tried bonine and dramamine and scopalomine patches. I've tried all three at once. Nothing works. So I broke down and bought a Reliefband. In the spirit of the SSS I will self monitor and report back.
    Raw ginger held in the mouth?
    Ginger ale?
    Presumably you are looking forward at the horizon? My understanding is the seasickness comes from your brain getting confused signals from the inner ear and eyes.
    Hope you get relief!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Jackie, unfortunately some macho sailors will deny seasickness exists but I agree it is real. Even after 4 years in the Navy I have had bouts in heavy seas. It is far from pleasant but I personally have endured and overcome with the mindset that my competitors are going through the same seas conditions!

    I personally have not had good luck with any of the traditional seasickness meds which seem to make it worse for me, but I did hear a fascinating lecture at the 2012? “Safety at Sea” seminar by the doctor of the CA States Golden Bear.

    If I remember right (open to clarification because I do not remember the details) he basically said before each sail they had the new crew members take seasickness meds 12Hrs before departure. Normally this reflected an approximate 20-30%% sea sickness rate. However, on one trip the departure was delayed due to engine problems, and since the crew had already taken meds +/- 48 hours before the rate dropped by half!

    Again, I do not remember the details but the point is prevention in advance may be an BIG advantage….Hope this helps….Rick/Lightspeed

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lightspeed View Post
    If I remember right (open to clarification because I do not remember the details) he basically said before each sail they had the new crew members take seasickness meds 12Hrs before departure. Normally this reflected an approximate 20-30%% sea sickness rate. However, on one trip the departure was delayed due to engine problems, and since the crew had already taken meds +/- 48 hours before the rate dropped by half!
    Makes sense in my experience. Me and the usual crew take at least 1 bonine tablet starting 1-2 days before departure and then once a day on a trip. Works for us.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2010
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    Thanks, everyone, for your feedback. I've tried the ginger candy - anyone who wants some is welcome - just ask next time you see me, it's aboard Dura Mater. It tastes good, lots of sugar, but has not helped me with seasickness. Bonine is better than dramamine because I don't get sleepy (not a good thing for a singlehander). I'll report back after the Farallones race regarding the Reliefband. Skip knows someone who tried it, for whom it didn't work. Maybe I'll have the lucky wrist.

  7. #7
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Smokester View Post
    Have you tries Sturgeron?
    Not after reading this: http://www.curingseasickness.com/stugeron.htm

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Montara, CA
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    Bonine 24 hours ahead, then one more the day of and don't eat anything the morning of departure, especially coffee or OJ (i.e., anything acidic). Large greasy hamburgers should be verboten, too, if you depart in the evening. That's what seems to work for me now. Every one (and every ocean) though is different. It might also help if you're steering the boat, or maybe standing at/near the helm.

    I almost got queasy in the bay today with 30 knots beating into the waves coming from Vallejo. Had made a big breakfast of sausage, bacon, eggs, pancakes, coffee and OJ -- the worst of the worst for me.

    You just gotta keep going offshore to figure it out

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    The good news is that most people get better as they get older (there had to be something 'better' about getting older). I've struggled with it most of my life altho I have pretty much outgrown it now. Single most important thing is to get the medicine that suits you best into your body at least 12 hours before departure. I've seen patches work beautifully for some but for me it's like taking acid (but costs more). When single handing I wouldn't be too worried about the drowsy aspect because altho it's unpleasant, if you're like me, you're so tuned up, that sleep is not really an issue. I took some Spanish anti motion pills in the Canary Islands once on the beginning of an Atlantic crossing. After a couple of hours I realized my crew and I were having far too much fun. Apparently they add a little speed to counter act the drowsiness factor. If you have the option, lying absolutely flat (no pillow) on your back helps most people. Sitting under an oak tree works well too as Dr Johnson said. Good luck, it's a bitch but a short term bitch and often helpful for weight loss.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    I have used wristbands and they worked for me. That, along with staying on the helm, no greasy food, limited coffee and having a ginger chew help me best. In the recent BAMA doublehanded Farralones I used scopolamine patch and that didn't work at all and the side effects of being uncoordinated and having metallic taste in my mouth were unpleasant. Those using bonine and dramimine should know the active ingredient is generically available as Meclizine HCl. It is sold over the counter at drugstores and cost is about $10 for 100 tablets. Has the same side effect of drowsiness.

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