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Thread: 2018 Golden Globe

  1. #1
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    Default 2018 Golden Globe

    This is pretty interesting . Extreme by anybody's standards I'm sure, please note the rule no electronics ! . Anyhow it's a good read . And some cool pictures too .
    http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/20...-announcement/
    Last edited by markwesti; 05-06-2015 at 06:14 PM.
    Westsail 28, Patricia A

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by markwesti View Post
    This is pretty interesting . Extreme by anybody's standards I'm sure, please note the rule no electronics ! . Anyhow it's a good read . And some cool pictures too .
    http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/20...-announcement/
    Peter Nichols' book "a voyage for madmen" is about that first race in 1968. I found it gripping. Read it twice, then again years later. I believe a Westsail would qualify for this race. Elizabeth or Tortuga would do us proud.

  3. #3
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    Thank's for the tip on the book Dura . The Westsail 32 does qualify. Here is a list of boats that do . http://mcintyreadventure.com/goldengloberace/about_ggr/
    Last edited by markwesti; 05-07-2015 at 11:54 AM.
    Westsail 28, Patricia A

  4. #4
    pogen's Avatar
    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    It is the mercy.

  5. #5
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    "Deep Water" is available on You Tube for free. It is an excellent documentary on the 1969 GG race. It's focused on Donald Crowhurst.

    Kind of haunting. It led me to google earth to find the remains of his boat on Cayman Brac

  6. #6
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    Kind of strange that they insist on production boats when few if any of the original participants were production boats. This would eliminate (I think) all wood boats when in fact Suhali was wood as was Crowhurst's boat (plywood, I think). 'Joshua' of course was steel. Seems a shame to not let boats like the Venus boats designed by Paul Johnson take place. But perhaps I misunderstood and you can apply and see if your boat is accepted.

  7. #7
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    In 1998 when I was teaching in London, "Suhaili" was displayed in the "The Great Hall" at the Greenwich Maritime Museum. I'd take the Tube down to Greenwich, pop out near "Cutty Sark," and make my way to the former hospital. "Suhaili" was surrounded by elegant stands and a golden rope to which were attached, "Please Do Not Touch" signs. Well, who could resist? Yes, those are my fingerprints on the starboard rail. Take me to the Tower! It was almost a religious experience to be truthful, so St. Paul's might be a better choice.

    Unfortunately, the museum's atmosphere proved too dry and "Suhaili's" teak hull (she was built in India to an Atkins design) began to dry out and shrink. The next time I taught in London, Franklin's "James Caird" had replaced "Suhaili" as the prime exhibit. Same stands, same golden rope, same signs, same handprint on the starboard rail. Dear me! Too many religious events for my soul.

    At some point "Suhaili" was refurbished and I believe could be chartered. Not sure if that's still the case.

    How about three American production fiberglass classics? The Bristol 33 or 34 and the Pearson Vanguard 33? The Vanguard had a good reputation as a "large" racer on SF Bay in the 1970s. Bristols were build like the proverbial house with the crescent moon cutout in the door. Any others?

    I suppose the 'glas and production requirements are for safety.

  8. #8
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    Why didn't I think of that? Glass production boats never have any safety problems, well if you discount keels and rudders falling off, masts falling overboard, hull/keel joints leaking, ports blowing in (or out, in Kevin's case) hatches leaking, thru hulls failing. Really, it's fibreglass, what could go wrong? Sarcasm aside, I made the same pilgrimage to the Greenwich Maritime Museum several times and stood in awe beside Chichester's Gypsy Moth (ignoring all his pissing and moaning about how tender the boat was) it was still great to see it. Actually I saw Tilman's Baroque (a Bristol Channel pilot cutter) at another maritime museum on the south coast and that was truly a shrine altho also suffering from being out of the water. Now fully restored and sailing again I'm glad to say. Now there is a boat to sail around the three great capes in.

  9. #9
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    The Bristol 33-34 are not legal . The rule is , must have a full length keel with the rudder hung at the trailing edge . I'm not sure about about the cutaway fore foot on the Pearson . ( It wouldn't be full length ) . However a Baba 35 is listed as legal with it's cutaway fore foot . I agree about wood boats should be included , or at least inspected and deemed worthy or not up for it .
    Westsail 28, Patricia A

  10. #10
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    Right. I meant a Bristol 35, but got my notes mixed up. -- Pat

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