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Thread: Lesson's Learned (Ventus).....for those considering this race in the future.

  1. #11
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    My diver ratted me out eh?

    I have one of those ATN Gale Sails you guys can try if you like. I bought it from Etienne (aka "ATN") at the boat show, mostly because I liked the idea that it clips on over the rolled-up jib so you don't have to turn a sail loose on the foredeck in bad conditions. Like most of our storm sails it has never been used (and hopefully never will be). Let me know and I'll get it to you to play with.

    I also have an inner stay on which I can set a hanked-on jib. It was a bigger project than I expected but it works pretty well. Lots of photos available if you want to check it out.
    Here are photos of the Gale Sail and the #4 on the removable inner stay. The Gale Sail attaches with hanks on the side away from the camera.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    56

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    Thanks for the pictures. In my case I would use a spin halyard to hoist, which would then cross the forestay and chafe a bit. I like this solution better than trying to drag the old jib off the foredeck and feed the storm jib in luff groove in 30 knots.....
    As an aside I seem to recall you have vertical battens.....how do you deal with headsail changes offshore.....or is do you furl main jib and go with #4 on inner stay? If so any concern about furled jib getting loose in bigger wind??
    Thanks as always,
    Chris

  3. #13
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    Sep 2007
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    You might check the sheave box for your jib halyard. I discovered my 92 had a second sheave in there, just below the primary jib halyard. I use that second halyard more than I expected. Even if you don't have a second jib halyard I wouldn't worry about chafe using the spinny halyard instead. For Hawaii you're going to want to cover the sail end of the spinny halyard with some DCS (Linky to DCS cover). Just add enough more cover to handle where it crosses the headstay when used with the storm jib - it won't add much. (Edit: Yes it will on your boat - I just remembered your kite is masthead.) Also, in a blow the halyard won't be laying against the headstay unless you've tacked - that much halyard (between the head of the storm jib and the mast) will push off to leeward.

    Vertical battens are a PITA solo. In that photo of the #4 they aren't installed and it seems to work okay without them. My newest #3 has horizontal roller battens, which have their own issues. A J/92 owner in NY told me he has a way to fold the #3 (with verticals) along the leech before stowing it - I'll see if I can find that note. He says it works fine and he doesn't have to remove them. On headsail changes I've been pulling them out before the sail gets stuffed down the hatch. I try to do things methodically up there but I'm surprised I haven't lost any jib battens yet. To answer your question I remove the old jib and stuff it down the hatch, then set the new sail. Unless that ATN sail was clipped over the rolled jib, I'd be worried about it starting to come loose and tearing itself up.
    Last edited by BobJ; 07-25-2015 at 09:45 PM.

  4. #14
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    Jul 2015
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    I will check...thanks. I do have some cover on the spin halyard.....not sure it is long enough.....good point that it will be blowing away to leeward anyway (if it lead it correctly ;-)

    I have seen a flaking method so the vertical battens don't need to be removed. I seriously doubt I could pull it off (solo, wind and waves).....3 of us managed it at the dock. And then it is very poorly set up to re hoist because the luff is flaked at an angle so it struggles with the pre-feeder and luff groove.

    Had not considered pulling battens and using hatch. I trussed up my jib like a large sausage and drug it back through the cockpit. Perhaps I am overly fearful of wave coming over the bow..

    In the situation where you are striking your #4 and putting up the gale sail.....do you envision using the hatch or dragging it all aft?

  5. #15
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    Sep 2007
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    Yeah, when Todd told me about folding the verticals up the leech I had my doubts - probably why I didn't save his note.

    I don't ship much water over the bow - the boat has some flare to the topsides. Especially with the dodger installed jibs go down the forward hatch. A someday project is to turn the hatch around so it opens on the aft side instead of forward.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    111

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    Chris, in the very light winds, were you able to induce heal by sitting on the low side?

    Joe

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    I like the SSS because it’s Fun in a managed risk environment. The NOR ocean requirements are getting to be a bit much and too focused on equipment and not on the “Human Factor.”

    Safety at Sea Seminars have helped raise that awareness, but I strongly believe the rest is up to You.

    Ocean racing is fun, but I know that I can be pressed to the limit and it’s the risk that I accept and try to mitigate.

    If there were no risk, it would be no Fun for me. Risk taking is part of the human culture, no leaps or advances can occur on a group level or personal level without it. Society understands that, else we would outlaw many activities like motorcycling, skydiving and single handed sailing, or "America's got Talent."

    Sleep deprivation and Fatigue. The better your physical conditioning, the better your mind will operate when that time comes. I know my limits and I know when to hit the sack. If I can’t hit the sack because of stress or fear, then I need to make adjustments to my expectations. If I must stay up because of risk of life or property, then it’s the only time I will triple dose on instant coffee. I break my coffee habit before a long ocean race, so that also increases the stimulants effect.

    From Major Dick Winters, Commander of Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, war memoirs from Band of Brothers combat leader reflecting on pre-requisites for success.

    “Because I was in such good shape, my fatigue level never reached the point of physical exhaustion that contributes to mental exhaustion and, ultimately, combat fatigue. We all experience sleep deprivation at times - that is the nature of stress - but a physically exhausted leader routinely makes poor decisions in times of crisis.”

    I think a good start is sharing our sleep management experiences. Research and presentations help, but talking about what works across the different sailors is valuable.

    AIS transmitter? Not on my Express 27. I would rather save the energy, space and weight for other essentials like a robust emergency rudder system. I am more concerned about hitting debris.
    Last edited by Submarino; 08-09-2015 at 04:55 PM.

  8. #18
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    Jul 2015
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    Quick answer yes......in light winds with lots of sun I usually went for shade ;-)
    Chris

  9. #19
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    Jul 2015
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    I think you are probably right about bigger risk being debris...and the priority on the steering system....being pretty new I found it easier to rest with the AIS transponder...even if it wasn't really making me any safer...the feeling of "safety" was helpful.

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