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Thread: Safety at Sea Seminar

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Arnold, CA
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    "You should really consider an PLB EPIRB, smaller, assured response, battery life of 30 to 48 hours, immediate ID of boat and location, consistent view of satellites as opposed to terrestrial station subject to blockage by buildings/ships/ and sea water if you happen to be overboard, and immediate USCG response. "

    I do have a plb registered to me as part of the coastal requirements.



    "I am beginning to wonder what happens with all that gear, will we still float ?"

    Actually, since all the gear floats, (plb, strobe,vhf), I should have increased buoyancy!
    Last edited by Daydreamer; 01-24-2016 at 05:31 PM. Reason: stupid auto spell

  2. #52
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    Jan 2012
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    Santa Barbara Sometimes
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    This is a sobering blow-by-blow account of a singlehander losing his sailboat and being rescued off the OR coast recently (Dec 2015). Interesting to hear how all his electronics failed, during a cascade of other failures…. The last 7 minutes are the ‘best' if you don’t want to listen to the whole story.

    S/V Tatoosh – What Happened? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCTK3tc6P14

    I came across this story while looking at dinghys for sale in the Cruisers forum. Here's the answer to a question about why the dinghy was lost offshore and only accessories (left home) were being sold:

    "Dec 7...offshore OR. 50-60 knots storm force winds . 20.ft seas. Had the dinghy lashed to the cabin top...took.a hit which somehow broke off the stern of dinghy. Hard to believe I know. I went in the water and CG helo picked me up. See Youtube: The sinking of Tatoosh."

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    2,366

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    I wonder when the Northern California Safety equipment list will include this new product as an option instead of all those expensive flares?

    https://siriussignal.com/

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    I wonder when the Northern California Safety equipment list will include this new product as an option instead of all those expensive flares?

    https://siriussignal.com/
    Good question. I purchased a Sirius Signal LED SOS Distress Light & Flag and received them today. My main reason for the purchase was so not to have to be concerned about flare expiration dates in case of CG boarding, and it looks to be much safer than pyrotechnics.

    Some background: Sue and I participated in the Oct 2014 two-day “Survival at Sea” class at SFYC. It is REALLY worth attending. As that time we got several opportunities to set off flares (hand held only, no rocket types). There is no question that the SOLAS flares are much brighter and last longer than the ones that meet the CG minimum requirements. The SOLAS flares are what you will want to get attention day or night. When you need them, you won’t care about the cost. One good lesson learned from the class was that you should pack a pair of heavy gloves with your flares.

    Some comments on the Sirius Signal LED SOS Distress Light & Flag: It’s a strobe that flashes SOS. It is not intended as a daytime signal, that’s why they provide the flag. The effectiveness of any signaling device will depend on the circumstances. IMHO, the flag is a joke. It would be worthless to gain attention and maybe only good if SAR folks were already looking for you. I’m not sure the strobe would get much attention in daylight. IMHO a red flare would be better.

    The strobe is very bright and would likely be quite visible at night; I have yet to test it. The question in my mind is, would anyone pay attention, especially if there are background lights? We are somewhat pre-programmed to pay attention to a bright red flare. I suspect a strobe flashing SOS might only lead to, “WTF is that?”

    So back to Philpott’s question… I don’t think the Sirius Signal LED SOS Distress Light & Flag comes close to meeting the intent of the NorCal Offshore Equipment requirements. IMHO it is an ok solution for meeting the minimum CG requirements as long as you have other options for getting attention as dictated by the circumstances.

    Tom P.
    CLOUD

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    San Jose, CA
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    7

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    I find myself in the same situation, having sailed the Transpac and half a dozen Longpacs, but needing to re-qualify for the current ocean races. I contacted the Race Committee and they suggested that I monitor this thread. Doesn't seem like I have made much progress but would be glad to find out when there will be a SaS class in the area.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    The half-day seminar is on the calendar for April 9 at the boat show: http://strictlysailpacific.com/semin...at-sea-course/
    And there's a two-day at Encinal March 14-15, according to Don Ahrens on Pressure Drop.

  7. #57
    pogen's Avatar
    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    Nov 2008
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    I will try and keep this page up to date on SAS class availability -- also see the links to the USSailing "Find a SAS Class" page

    http://sfbaysss.org/main/ocean-racing-requirements/

    If there is a class not on the list, please message me and I will add it.

  8. #58
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    Jan 2013
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    Montara, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgmo View Post
    This is a sobering blow-by-blow account of a singlehander losing his sailboat and being rescued off the OR coast recently (Dec 2015). Interesting to hear how all his electronics failed, during a cascade of other failures…. The last 7 minutes are the ‘best' if you don’t want to listen to the whole story.

    S/V Tatoosh – What Happened? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCTK3tc6P14

    I came across this story while looking at dinghys for sale in the Cruisers forum. Here's the answer to a question about why the dinghy was lost offshore and only accessories (left home) were being sold:

    "Dec 7...offshore OR. 50-60 knots storm force winds . 20.ft seas. Had the dinghy lashed to the cabin top...took.a hit which somehow broke off the stern of dinghy. Hard to believe I know. I went in the water and CG helo picked me up. See Youtube: The sinking of Tatoosh."
    How sad. What I took away from this is the "cascade effect." I learned this well in cave diving -- it's not usually one thing that causes the catastrophe, but a multitude of things that cumulatively cannot be overcome. In the case of Tatoosh, he admits that he left later in the season than he had wanted, the slugs in his sail blew out, then his bilge pump dies, all the bars to the harbors were closed, and on.

    As to the SAS, if you find one, suggest signing up ASAP as they do sell out quickly. The one at Strictly Sail is the half-day Coastal Sailing SAS, which meets the NCORC requirements. I also did the PacCup seminar, which is a one-day class with a life raft demo. What I took away from that is how the life jacket doesn't inflate right away if your foulies keep you afloat for a bit and that the crotch straps need to be really snug to keep the life jacket from strangling you. Good practical info to know.
    Last edited by Gamayun; 02-08-2016 at 05:10 PM.

  9. #59
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    Jan 2008
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    Santa Rosa
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    In reference to having thigh/crouch straps tight. It really is an interesting exercise to spend a CO2 cylinder (when you think it's time to renew yours is good) by getting all duded up in your normal sailing togs, foulies, & life jacket - and jumping in. Have help nearby! You will probably keep the straps tighter in the future, no matter how uncomfortable that might be!

    You've seen those films of NASA space folks all suited up for space walk practicing in a swimming pool? So, after you've jumped in and are now surrounded by billowing foulies, an inflated life jacket with straps tugging at your privates, and can hardly move, get back on board using whatever method you've planned for. Or just try swimming across the aisle to the other side of the marina. Maybe finding your attached PLB among all the stuff that's billowing or floating, opening it, extending the antenna, & punching the red button might be enough?

    If you have a chance to do this with an inflated life raft handy, get yourself into that, too. Then go back and reconsider how to stay on board to begin with.

    I think the 2-day SAS by far the best way to learn what works, might work, won't work.

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    There is a Coastal Safety at Sea Seminar in LA. on the 27th of Feb. It is a four hour course.
    Contact Paul Decapua, PH: 949 644 9530 Email: sailfleet bcyc.org

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