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Thread: Safety at Sea Seminar

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by P. Broderick - Elaine View Post
    In reference to having thigh/crouch straps tight. It really is an interesting exercise to spend a CO2 cylinder (when you think it's time to renew yours is good) by getting all duded up in your normal sailing togs, foulies, & life jacket - and jumping in. Have help nearby! You will probably keep the straps tighter in the future, no matter how uncomfortable that might be!

    You've seen those films of NASA space folks all suited up for space walk practicing in a swimming pool? So, after you've jumped in and are now surrounded by billowing foulies, an inflated life jacket with straps tugging at your privates, and can hardly move, get back on board using whatever method you've planned for. Or just try swimming across the aisle to the other side of the marina. Maybe finding your attached PLB among all the stuff that's billowing or floating, opening it, extending the antenna, & punching the red button might be enough?

    If you have a chance to do this with an inflated life raft handy, get yourself into that, too. Then go back and reconsider how to stay on board to begin with.

    I think the 2-day SAS by far the best way to learn what works, might work, won't work.
    A slight contrary opinion. In the 2012 shtp I found myself, 36 hours east of Hanalei, alone, in the water staring at the starboard rail of my Olson 34,having just executed a perfect round up followed by a stunning round down, while attempting to douse the 3/4 oz, and standing on the fore deck. My tether led from my inflatable, under the life lines, to the jack line. The roiling sea, animated by the squall that was passing, turned out to be a great assistant as it raised me to the life lines repeatedly. I grasped for a stanchion as a swell passed beneath me, and was able to crawl aboard displaced one stanchion position from where I had rolled into the warm Pacific. Once back on deck I started a slow process to recover the spinnaker gear so as not to lose anything. I probably spent ten minutes getting the tattered kite, guys, and sheets back on the boat. During this entire process I did not notice the fully inflated life jacket, it just never was a hindrance. Maybe it was the adrenaline ?

  2. #62
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    Maybe just a bit of adrenaline ! In the 2000 SHTP a competitor went over the side from the foredeck and was hanging onto the hanked-on jib SANS tether ! Wave also assisted him back onboard. Buckle up.

  3. #63
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    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    Seminar details firmed up for the May 14 - 15 classes at EYC: https://pacificcup.org/16/sas-encinal

  4. #64
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    Signed up for two day. Thanks

  5. #65
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    I signed up for two, too.

    Signed, Who of the Owl

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    That's fine Bob but that doesn't help singlehanders. In the SSS program, the SH Farallones is a qualifier for the LongPac and the LongPac is a qualifier for the SH TransPac. SH Farallones is a significant step in the SSS program whereas your DHF is a single, stand-alone race.

    When SSS cooperated with NorCalORC and adopted its new rules for SSS's ocean races, we expected it would be possible to comply with those rules. In a further development, the rules are no longer established locally but are now promulgated by the USSER committee of US Sailing. In a post on Pressure-Drop almost three years ago, I predicted this would be SSS's undoing when it came to retaining equipment and training requirements appropriate for shorthanding.

    The US Sailing Safety Equipment Requirements (USSER) committee and NorCalORC are quick to point out that local race authorities (like SSS) can edit the rules as they choose, so I suggest SSS remove the SAS requirement this year since sufficient courses are not available locally. For next year, I propose that SSS reinstate its original rules for its ocean races. They were developed over many years by our own members and were designed for racing shorthanded. SSS uses its own rules for our Bay races and participation continues to increase. Participation in our ocean races dropped off significantly when we adopted the NorCalORC rules, and it has not recovered. Check the entry history on Jibeset for our SH Farallones and Half Moon Bay races to confirm this.
    I was simply pointing out an example that solves the problem.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harrier View Post
    "Uniform equipment" and "training requirement" is a good thing. I would agree to that wholeheartedly. But, it seems to me, that what really happens is a constantly moving and changing target. But I really don't have the background to see it like most SSSers since the only SSS races I have ever participated in were SHTPs.
    And related to some degree, is my view of the "training requirements". I have seen the SSS attempt, with some success, to encourage SHTP participation not only just from the Bay Area, but from other areas and countries, as well. To require potential participants to attend sessions solely in the Bay Area seems to me to be counter productive. And, at least for the SHTP, the SSS seminars have yet to be required, as far as I know...Haven't looked at this year's NOR tho.
    This point of out of towners (such as DHF) is the reason an online seminar was requested and now available.
    http://www.ussailing.org/education/safety-at-sea/

    The nationalization of USS SAS forms a common background but doesn't cover local specifics which can be critical.
    Last edited by K38Bob; 03-04-2016 at 04:12 PM.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil MacFarlane View Post
    Hey guys, I was just asking where I could find some classes. I certainly didn’t mean to come in here after being AWAL for close to a decade and stir up anything.

    I have never been one to complain about the rules of a game we play for fun. I have always just tried to comply. Not saying that’s the right way to be but that’s who I am. God bless those of you who are passionate enough to fight it out. That said, I have never been a fan of more rules and requirements but it seems like there always is and always will be more. I was really unhappy when after racing to Kauai in 2000 with only a VHF I had to install an SSB for the next race. Silly to my mind. Still is. But what are you going to do?

    From an outsiders’ point of view, because that’s who I am now. The SSS is still my first choice for information and training. You have seen me at every 2016 SHTP seminar so far. And I aint even doing the race! They are just as good as they were when I started attending them in the mid 90’s and as then, I thank all those who are making them possible.

    So now we can still attend the great SSS “classes” and we have to take another “parent” class also. I’m really ok with it I’m sure I can learn something there too. It would just be nice if it was easier to do. The online thing sounds good. I probably wont be ready for the Farallones anyway.

    But…
    Brian, you have suggested two things. To consider the reading BAMA’s required reading list as equivalent. I found those here :

    http://www.sfbama.org/2015/DHF/nr.pdf

    with links on page four. I will certainly reread these and if that works to get me in the Farallones entry list that’s great.

    Then as I said I probably wont be ready by then anyway so you suggested the ZYC race. This sounds like fun. I hope I would not be the only one there though.

    Then I guess there’s the chance the online course could be ready soon…

    Anyway I’m really looking forward to sailing on Sail a Vie in the Ocean again.
    Here is the text for BAMA's 37th DHF 2016 education (skipper and crew)- see Pg 4 NOR/SI for links http://www.sfbama.org/2016/DHF/index.html

    VENUE AND EQUIPMENT EDUCATION
    This race has a history of inclement weather and this venue has seen more than its share of sailing fatalities. Safety at Sea Seminars are valuable to gain basic knowledge and are recommended. All racers are required to have read the following since January 2014.

    DHF 2016
    1. Hypothermia
    a. Read USCG Cold Water Facts (link)
    b. Read "Crew rescued"
    c. Watch "Crew rescued"
    d. Read "ASA Actions to help a hypothermic-sailor"
    2. Read at least pages 35 through 55 (Appendix D and E) of the US Sailing Independent Review Panel report on 2012 Fully Crewed Farallones race. That report can be found here on the BAMA web site.
    3. Watch at least Chapters 1-4 of the BoatUS “Radio Communication for the Recreational Mariner”

    DHF 2015
    1. At least pages 1 through 23 of the US Sailing Independent Review Panel report on 2013 Islands Race. That report can be found here on BAMA web site (link).
    2. PFD selection guides.
    a. USCG (link)
    b. PFDMA (link)
    3. Rudder loss a. 1992 DHF Rudder Loss by Joe Siudzinski, 5/8/99 (link) b. 1993 SHF - Lose a Rudder at the Farallones? No Problem! by Joe Siudzinski, 4/11/93 (link)
    4. DSC Calling: Who’s Gonna Answer? (link)

    DHF 2014
    1. At least pages 1 through 17 of the US Sailing Independent Review Panel report on 2012 Fully Crewed Farallones race. That report can be found here on the BAMA web site.
    2. Rescue of the crew of “Pterodactyl”
    3. Rescue of the crew of “Heat Wave”
    4. USCG “Rescue 21: Digital Selective Calling”
    5. Watch at least Chapters 5-7 of the BoatUS “Radio Communication for the Recreational Mariner”
    6. USCG instructions for “How to obtain an MMSI number”

  9. #69
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    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    In case you missed it

    USSailing now offers the half-day Coastal SAS class online. See

    http://www.ussailing.org/education/safety-at-sea/

    When this class is complete, there appears to be an online record of the person's cert.

    I believe that the half-day 'coastal' online class can be used to satisfy the SAS requirement for SSS regular season (excluding LongPac and TransPac).

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by pogen View Post
    In case you missed it

    USSailing now offers the half-day Coastal SAS class online. See

    http://www.ussailing.org/education/safety-at-sea/

    When this class is complete, there appears to be an online record of the person's cert.

    I believe that the half-day 'coastal' online class can be used to satisfy the SAS requirement for SSS regular season (excluding LongPac and TransPac).
    Overview of safety at sea approaches, options http://www.latitude38.com/lectronic/...6-03-14#Story4

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