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Thread: Interested in a boat for 2018 TransPac

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlyJeff View Post
    Hmm, I haven't sailed a Hobie 33 but I imagine it would be a handful for a beginner.
    +1, unless the beginner seeks and enjoys surfing down waves at 20 knots in the dark..Ask Syn. She and two experienced crew had thrilling times in the last Pac Cup on AERO, and that was triple handed. At one point they couldn't remember if the spinnaker was up or not it was so dark (it was up.)

    Sleep deprivation will do that. Though we never definitively heard, we do know the skipper of Hobie 33 SPACE COWBOY got tired of conversing with voices in the SHTP when he decided to step off his boat. Ghost ship if there ever was one.
    Last edited by sleddog; 01-16-2017 at 04:42 PM.

  2. #102
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    We've had a few short-term or "serial" boat owners who've bought a boat for the SHTP, scrambled to get it in shape and equipped, and then raced it once to Kauai. They've either sold their boats over there or as soon as they got them back here, and in some cases we haven't heard from them again.

    Most of us aren't like that. Sled is a notable example. He raced over in 1978 and 30 years later, he raced again in the same boat (and won). I've owned my boat for 14 years and hope to race it a fourth time to Hawaii (my posts about cruisier boats notwithstanding). I'll also note that the average historical "gestation period" for a first-time SHTP campaign is five years.

    So if it was me, I'd buy a boat I would enjoy sailing for awhile (including with family), do some singlehanded races with it (we have quite a few), rattle around in the ocean a bit and then see what you think about racing it solo to Hawaii.

    As they say, "my two cents."

  3. #103
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    +
    Two cents well spent.
    Thelonious II, Ericson 38 (formerly Thelonious, E32-3)
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  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    We've had a few short-term or "serial" boat owners who've bought a boat for the SHTP, scrambled to get it in shape and equipped, and then raced it once to Kauai. They've either sold their boats over there or as soon as they got them back here, and in some cases we haven't heard from them again.

    Most of us aren't like that. Sled is a notable example. He raced over in 1978 and 30 years later, he raced again in the same boat (and won). I've owned my boat for 14 years and hope to race it a fourth time to Hawaii (my posts about cruisier boats notwithstanding). I'll also note that the average historical "gestation period" for a first-time SHTP campaign is five years.

    So if it was me, I'd buy a boat I would enjoy sailing for awhile (including with family), do some singlehanded races with it (we have quite a few), rattle around in the ocean a bit and then see what you think about racing it solo to Hawaii.

    As they say, "my two cents."
    This would be me. I was unable to get everything ready in 1996, but left the day after the race started and sailed a Ranger 29 to Kauai. I had a wonderful passage, the Navik windvane did 90% of the steering, I flew the kite when it was light and spent a lot of time wing-and wing. 16 days later I got to Kauai. I gave the boat to the University of Hawaii sailing program when I got there. In 2007 I bought a Santa Cruz 27 and set it up for the passage. Two months before leaving, I put the boat up for sale on Craigslist, HI and had 15 respondants. I literally had four extremely well-qualified, serious buyers to choose from. The boat is now racing out of the Ala Wai.

    I did this because sailing, for me is not something that I can devote a lot of money to. I don't have a 32+ foot cruising boat that would be comfortable and fun to sail back from Hawaii. Also, I haven't been able to take another month off of work in order to sail back. Buying a Santa Cruz 27 for $10K, putting $6K worth of gear on it and sailing to Hawaii was great, but that burned through the entire sailing kitty. I took off a lot of the $6K worth of gear and got it back to California, where I sold it. I sold the boat in Hawaii for $8K. Upshot was, when I was all done, I had zero in the kitty but no debt...and no boat. I was not able to afford to take another month off to sail a Santa Cruz 27 back from Kauai to San Francisco and shipping the boat on Matson was $10,000. That made absolutely zero financial sense. Spend ten grand to ship a ten grand boat back? I could sell the boat for eight, come back to California and buy another SC27 for the money I'd spend on shipping the boat, easily. Anyway, I spent the next seven years wearing kilts, throwing hammers, stones and cabers at the highland games, pooping around on the SSS forum (I did a couple of race committees) and sailing a little wood boat that I can keep for nothing in the front yard.

    My goal in 2008 was to sail the SHTP....not have a "forever boat". I achieved my goals. I sailed the race. As stated in another thread, my goals were: 1.) finish the race 2.) finish the race with a smile on my face 3.) Not be last. Note that this was in 2008, and it's now 2017 and I'm just about to sail my next SSS race after that 2008 SHTP. It took me 8 years to buy another boat fit to sail on the main Bay.

    So I would say this.... You MUST THINK ABOUT YOUR GOALS. What do you want? WHAT DO YOU WANT? Do you want to sail to Hawaii? You don't have to do a race to sail to Hawaii. Do you want to do the SHTP, specifically? That's a very different goal from wanting to win the SHTP, outright. Do you want to be the First to Finish? Do you want to have a great boat and do a cool passage? Just what is it that you are trying to accomplish, here?

    I gotta say...just blindly blundering along, "I'm doing the singlehanded transpac" because it sounds cool, without really knowing what the 'eff you actually want out of this process is pretty blitheringly stupid. If you want to throw money at boat, I have a candidate....you're welcome to throw money at mine.

    Do you want to have a boat that you can sail all over the Pacific? Do you want to do the Singlehanded Transpac? Do you want to WIN the Singlehaded TransPac. What do you want? Do you detect a theme to this post? I have to tell you that I was heartily sick of prepping boats for the Singlehanded TransPac after 2008. It's a freaking year of work and a lot of money. I've done it three times. It's a great learning process but I can't recommend doing it over and over and over again. I plan to do another SHTP in my current boat. I will prep it. But that boat is coming back to California with me, I'm not doing this "prep the boat and then sell it" again. Screw that. Been there, done that, got more t-shirts than I need.
    Last edited by AlanH; 01-19-2017 at 12:06 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
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  5. #105
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    I'm reading this and I have a thought or two. Quit all this garbage about the SHTP. You're not ready. You don't even know what the difference between sailing a Hobie 33 and sailing a Scampi 30 is.

    Go sail on other peoples boats for two full racing seasons. Then buy a boat and singlehand it on races in the Bay and in the Ocean for two years. Have you sailed around the Farallone Islands, yet? It sounds like the answer is "no". Dude....first things, first.

    THEN, if you're still interested in the Singlehanded TransPac, start prepping your boat.

    There is an alternative. I wrote it all out, but it came off sounding really snarky so I deleted it. Upshot...sail on other peoples boats in the Bay and in the Ocean for two full seasons. Then buy a boat. Singlehand it for two full seasons. THEN start thinking about the Singlehanded TransPac.
    Last edited by AlanH; 01-19-2017 at 12:32 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    I've done it three times.
    Because of this, you weren't who I had in mind when I posted.

    If someone wants to buy a boat, race to Kauai and then move on to the next big adventure, good on 'em. My point was that most of us aren't wired up that way. Maybe you could say we're sailors first and adventurers second.

    By the way, Philippe originally introduced himself over in the crew thread and was indeed looking to crew on OPB's to gain experience. I hope he's able to do so because it also helps in deciding what kind of boat you want to own. I also see he's entered to race an Olson 30 in the 3BF.

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    Because of this, you weren't who I had in mind when I posted.

    If someone wants to buy a boat, race to Kauai and then move on to the next big adventure, good on 'em. My point was that most of us aren't wired up that way. Maybe you could say we're sailors first and adventurers second.

    By the way, Philippe originally introduced himself over in the crew thread and was indeed looking to crew on OPB's to gain experience. I hope he's able to do so because it also helps in deciding what kind of boat you want to own. I also see he's entered to race an Olson 30 in the 3BF.
    No worries, Bob! I still fit the description.

    I've set up three different boats to sail across to Hawaii, and actually done it in two of them. Back when I did the Ranger 29, the rules didn't require an SSB or Sat Phone...there sort of weren't Sat Phones back then. So I got in the boat, took off and didn't talk to anybody until Ken Roper came up on the VHF, sixteen days later. You're right, most folks aren't "wired" how I've been wired, and I have to say that I'm quite done with being wired this way! If I could've had what I wanted, I'd have been sailing a Pacific Boats Olson 911S since about 1987.

    However, family budget and staying married in mind, when I look back I'm completely OK with how I did all this. The prep for the 2008 SHTP was not fun. It was the third time around. I'd failed at getting to Hawaii the 2nd time and I wasn't doing the race because I thought I would enjoy it. I was doing the race so that I could look at myself in the mirror in the morning and not say "failure". There was no joy in my 2007-2008 prep. Once I got to the Corinthian YC, though, it started to be fun and the sail was great. It wasn't as grand as the 1996 passage, but it was The Race, and I was doing it and I had a good time. Anyway, I'm rambling.

    If Philippe is getting sailing experience, then that's all to the good!
    Last edited by AlanH; 01-19-2017 at 05:36 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    There is an alternative. I wrote it all out, but it came off sounding really snarky so I deleted it.
    That's cool ... the rest was so friendly I really am interested in seeing what snarky is ... Seriously what were you suggesting? Float on my belly with a sail up my a**?

    snark·y
    adjective NORTH AMERICAN informal
    (of a person, words, or a mood) sharply critical; cutting; snide.
    "the kid who makes snarky remarks in class"
    cranky; irritable.
    "Bobby's always a bit snarky before his nap"


    Anyways ... OPB hasn't worked for me. No boat yet so stepping out of TBF; all a bit premature.

  9. #109
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    Well, if OPB hasn't worked out, then has been pointed out, there are two great boats currently for sale on Craigslist... the Scampi 30 and the Albin Cumulus.

    If those are honestly out of your budget...and I totally understand how they could be, it's not the sales price that's the killer, it's the recurring costs... then there's a Cal 24 for $1800 on Craigslist. It's not glamorous, it's not fast but it can absolutely do the trip. Cal 20's have gone and the 24 is a lot bigger.

    There's an old Columbia 26 for 500 lousy bucks on Craigslist.-- http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/boa/5959569234.html -- Again, not fast. --> Definitely not glamorous. But it will sail to Hawaii and not break the bank. BTW, I dunno about the bubble-top Col 26. ugh. But the oldie which is a stretched Col 24... they're pretty solid.

    Until yesterday or something, there was a Bristol 27 on CL. The Bristol 27 was the boat that Carl Alberg designed for Bristol Yachts to compete directly with the Triton, which he also drew. They are solid as a rock cruising boats, if a bit top-heavy to my eye. Again, not "fast". Not "HOT". But solid and it will get you there.

    The thing about really slow boats on the race to Hawaii is that they rate so much slower that you can finish DAYS behind the ultralights and beat 'em on handicap. It's happened before. Also, are you experienced enough and aggressive enough to drive an ultralight hard, day in and day out and get all the performance out of it, that you should? I'm not. I took a Santa Cruz 27 to Hawaii and I absolutely should have had a slower boat. I didn't have the spinnaker up all the time, I wasn't playing games with the squalls and so on. I just pointed the boat at Hawaii and kind of tried to make her keep going.

    Are you aggressive enough and skilled enough to get everything out of an ultralight, all the way to Hawaii? If the answer is "no" then.......don't take an ultralight.

    But honestly, that Scampi 30? The boat has a working diesel. It's a great design, they made about a bazillion of the mark iii's and they're still cruising all over the Baltic, not to mention probably 50+ on the East coast of the US. I've been beaten by Scampi 30's. This one has got some fancypants Ballenger double-spreader rig...so that's anice replacement, there, and I bet dollars to doughnuts that the running backs are for sail shape, not to keep the stick up.

    Peter Norlin nailed it on that boat's design. Look at YouTube, there are umpty-ump Scampi 30 videos on there. The Scampi 30 has a big cabin and a dinky little cockpit. That's great for singlehanding and doublehanding, everything is within reach. Offshore, if you take a wave in the cockpit, you're not filling up a bumptillion gallons of water. There's a nice bridgedeck to put the traveler on...the primary winches are right there...it's a tiller boat. Sure it's an IOR boat with big headsails and a little main, but you don't HAVE to fly that 155% every time.

    I dunno, man.... if you're on a budget, or just starting out, there are a couple of awfully good options available on CL right now.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  10. #110
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    Seriously what were you suggesting? Float on my belly with a sail up my a**?
    That's funny. Now I'm going to hijack your thread.

    I'm in the process of prepping my boat to sail to Kauai this June with my wife. After much dreaming, discussion and planning about doing the SHTP, my wife simply suggested, "Hey, why don't you just prep and plan to sail to Kauai this summer." and she added, "...with me". It all made perfect sense...kinda. Anyway, I finding it overwhelming at times to complete all the projects to satisfaction on top of work, family and finding time to sail. I'm finding all kinds a little things that can become potential problems while making a passage. Whether it's wiring, plumbing, rigging or water ingress through port lights, it all can be a potential issue. I saying all this for me, because I got to have confidence in my boat. I'm probably overly paranoid, but I have reason to be.
    During my first passage with Peter Heiberg I experienced some heavy weather. It blew 40knts and seas were 14ft 9secs for about 20 hrs. We took on multiple waves, one knocked Peter to the floor of the cockpit. I was in awe at the helm when I realized I was looking downhill at the bow on Peter's 50ft sloop. The only thing that kept me from being scared was that I was with an experienced veteran sailor who was a professional mariner. Peter told me later that if I still want to sail after that then you probably have experienced the worst weather you ever will...fingers crossed.
    This was my experience and although I have always respected the Ocean... being a surfer, I came away from that in awe. It's different when there is no land in site. I know others who are way more experienced and courageous than me will have a different opinion, but the thought of pointing my bow off the horizon and chasing the sun is intimidating as well as exciting. To take it lightly or become complacent is my worst fear. That's the approach I'm taking in prepping my boat.
    I'm sailing to Hawaii now because there is no better time than now. I'm sailing to Hawaii to see if I can do it. I'm sailing to Hawaii to grow with my wife. I'm sailing to Hawaii because it has been a dream of mine. I'm sailing to Hawaii to Prep for the SHTP. If we fail, we will have learned something and try it again. I'll keep you posted and you keep looking for your boat and follow your dream. You can do it, I can do it because others have done it. Good Luck! Let's keep inspiring one another. Love!

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