Page 14 of 18 FirstFirst ... 4101112131415161718 LastLast
Results 131 to 140 of 176

Thread: Late Pacs

  1. #131
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,054

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    Hey Sled, I'm going on a J/125 this year. RACER X bought it.
    Last Wednesday night I went over to sail out of Richmond with Chris Case on Fugu and we walked over to take a looksee at Mary and Rich's new boat. Wow. That's what we both kept saying out loud. We didn't touch it, because there were no smudges on it anywhere and we didn't want to get in trouble. It looks to be made for single/doublehanding, with all those lines led aft. I remember Racer X's red steering wheel, which seemed a whimsical touch. Maybe the same person who ordered that wheel ordered the nectarine orange mainsheet? It was for sure a thing of beauty. Have fun, kids!

  2. #132
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,722

    Default

    I thought you didn't touch it because it's new name is CAN'T TOUCH THIS.

    It's not a shorthanded boat in its current configuration, and you'd have to be Magilla Gorilla to work the loads. They plan to race with full crew and maybe keep the J/105 for doublehanding, SSS, etc. (Did you walk all the way over to KKMI to see it?)

    Back to the thread - it looks like Gregory just passed the Lightbucket.

  3. #133
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,054

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    (Did you walk all the way over to KKMI to see it?)
    Oh, maybe there is another J88 in the Richmond YC marina? Brand new. And YEEEEAAAAA! Greg! Littlest boat, brave guy!

  4. #134
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Albany, CA
    Posts
    169

    Default

    Looks like Libra is back in port. Great job completing the qualifier!

    Owl is sailing WSW to get some extra miles. He probably will turn back during the night and could be back in port tomorrow afternoon.

  5. #135
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    1,883

    Default

    Good job, LIBRA!

    And OWL. I temporarily had to stop watching OWL due to dizziness until I realized John was attempting to sign the boat's name with his track.

    I'm off to visit the skipper of one of the smallest boats to complete the SHTP, the Cal 20 BLACK FEATHERS, in 2008. If you haven't read the book Black Feathers, it's a great story. Robert and Jeanne now live in Forest Hills, east of Auburn in the Sierra foothills, where he builds Taiko drums.

  6. #136
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    86

    Default

    I bumped into LIBRA and Gregory on my walk home last night just as he was docking. He was in great spirits and the boat looked great (much cleaner than mine after the qualifier). Sounds like he had a lot of fun out there.

  7. #137
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    235

    Default

    At my age, my memory no doubt dims...but I'm fairly sure that when I qualified for the '84 SHTP, I sailed out 200 miles (actually more, since there was no sun there to take my required sextant shots) and then back from whatever distance. I believe the 200 miles offshore was a requirement...total "at least" 400 NM. Perhaps the rules have changed. Perhaps I was just being hard on myself...after all, it was 32 years ago!

  8. #138
    pogen's Avatar
    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    893

    Default

    Nice going guys -- the upcoming weekend is looking pretty tough!


  9. #139
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,054

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Harrier View Post
    At my age, my memory no doubt dims...but I'm fairly sure that when I qualified for the '84 SHTP, I sailed out 200 miles (actually more, since there was no sun there to take my required sextant shots) and then back from whatever distance. I believe the 200 miles offshore was a requirement...total "at least" 400 NM. Perhaps the rules have changed. Perhaps I was just being hard on myself...after all, it was 32 years ago!
    Sir, when you met up with the Transpac racers after the 1978 race you were coming from, forgive me if, at my age, my memory with no doubt dims, Tahiti. Or was it Rangoon? Or Fatu Hiva? Or Venezuela? I think sailing 200 miles offshore was a mere walk in the watery park for you. See you in Kauai!

  10. #140
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    79

    Default

    Results of my shakedown cruise.

    While I hoped to complete the qualifying cruise, the sail would have required I stay out through Thursday to make the required 400 miles. The forecast I obtained on Tuesday called for 12 to 14 foot seas on Thursday. The swell period forecast was 9 seconds - worse than the conditions under which I intentionally sail. So I turned around to avoid pointlessly burning up another two vacation days. Instead, since the conditions were very typical offshore, I used the sail as a shakedown to observe my boat's performance while heavily loaded. With cold, unemotional analysis, I've come to this conclusion: I need a bigger boat.

    I'm posting my results here in case someone can find a fault in my logic. Having spent a significant chunk of time and life savings preparing for the race, I'd be happy to hear of any gross errors on my part. I know smaller boats have completed the cruise in 21 days. Black Feathers did it, and I admire the skipper. But my early 60s vintage boat with it's modified full keel - while stable and sturdy - clings tenaciously to the water and defies proper balancing when an extra 1,000 pounds are added in the only available space.

    ----

    Conclusion: Assuming moderate wind, seastates and significant time spent sailing on a reach point of sail with ahead to abeam seas, the race could not be completed within the required 21 days. The boat was clearly overloaded. The shakedown sail was conducted with a load representing two-thirds the weight of consumables, to bias results toward performance in the first third of the cruise. Without clear skies for solar power production, sufficient power for the boat would not be available from the water generator at speeds below 4.8 knots, requiring use of the gasoline generator, in turn requiring more fuel than the 6 gallons carried. Downwind sailing in following seas may require use of a drogue device to manage yaw stability, adversely affecting speed.

    Conditions:

    Mild to moderate seas. Sustained winds 8 to 11 knots, maximum gusts of 16 knots. A close reach (50 to 60 degree apparent wind angle) point of sail was chosen on both tacks with head to abeam seas. Along with a full inventory of sails, 200 pounds of leadshot was added to simulate stores. When embarking, the total stores over basic empty weight would be:
    Batteries: 300 pounds (358 A/H)
    Gasoline generator: 40 pounds
    Full sail inventory: 60 pounds
    Life raft: 65 pounds
    Unconsumed food, water, (simulated by lead shot) and spares: 300 pounds
    Fuel for generator (6 gallons): 36 pounds
    Myself: 200 pounds
    Total: 1,001 pounds
    Cargo weight percentage of boat empty weight: ([1,001 / 5120] X100): 19.5%

    The 200 pounds of lead shot simulating 20 gallons of water plus 40 pounds of food and gear was placed at sole level in the forward cabin as far aft as possible - just forward of the main bulkhead under the mast step. Actual placement of those stores would be less optimal. To minimize adversely affecting roll stability, the life raft was placed on the forward sole (the only space available).

    Stats:

    Time underway: 32 hours 40 minutes.
    Distance traveled: 135.9 miles (130 miles under sail)
    Average speed (without engine during return): 3.9 knots.
    Extrapolated time to Hawaii at average speed (2,300 actual miles assumed): 590 hours (24.6 days)

    I estimate the same sail without the stores on board would have yielded an average speed of 4.8 knots.

    Observations:

    The boat was sluggish. While not in motion, the boat was balanced and "on its lines," though loaded was 3 inches lower at the water line. The static pitch balance was level (no up or down pitch at the slip), but the bow pitched down as speed increased and was down 3 to 5 degrees above 4 knots, demonstrating positive dynamic pitch instability. The bow buried in head seas causing considerable speed loss in swells compared to its normal performance. There was also a significant pitch down affect and detectable adverse yaw in light following seas. Moderate following seas would probably require use of a drogue device to maintain yaw stability. There was no noticeable affect on roll stability, but with actual stores placed higher than the leadshot at sole level, roll stability may be affected. The water generator (Hamilton Ferris) produced minimal power at speeds below 4.8 knots. Acquiring weather charts from saildocs via SSB caused the chartplotter to malfunction. It was restored with a reboot. The autopilot (Raymarine tiller pilot) was unaffected, while it was operating in wind-follow mode (the chartplotter failure would have cascaded to the autopilot had it been in coupled-operation with the chartplotter). All other systems performed as expected. 8 foot cross-seas were encountered during part of the sail which required running a jackline across the cabin overhead to permit standing upright. Light rain fell for 10 hours. No water was brought aboard and the bilge remained dry.
    Last edited by pbryant; 05-25-2016 at 01:34 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •