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Thread: All In The Family

  1. #1
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    Default All In The Family

    Doug Paine participated in the 2014 Singlehanded Transpac. I can't find his results on this site but it must be here somewhere. Here is an article from Wednesday's Wall Street Journal about his son, Caleb, who is participating as a Finn sailor in the Olympics. It is a half page spread and Caleb is a handsome boy. There. I've written it. If any SSS member feelsl micro agressed upon, sue me. And Caleb? Good luck in that water.

    Wall Street Journal 051116

    San Diego Sailor Trains for His First Olympics

    Caleb Paine, who started sailing as an infant, has adventure in his blood
    Dozens of Finn boats line up for a Sailing World Cup Series regatta in HyŤres, France, in 2015. ‘It’s a fleet full of dudes, and we’ve all pretty much raced against each other before,’ Mr. Paine says. ‘There’s always banter.’

    Caleb Paine, a 25-year-old Finn class sailor from San Diego, pictured on the marina at Club Nautico El Arenal in Mallorca, Spain, in April, days after earning his spot on the US Olympic Sailing Team bound for the 2016 Summer Games. This will be his first Olympics.

    American sailor Caleb Paine spends about nine months of the year traveling for sailing events. His watertight backpack holds essentials like extra warm clothes and food during a race.

    Sailor Caleb Paine’s toolbox contains screwdrivers, wrenches, knives, ropes and pulleys for making repairs to his Finn sailboat. He will be sailing for the U.S.A in the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

    To keep sun and rain off his face, Caleb Paine wears his lucky San Diego Padres baseball cap; he rarely wears sunglasses because they affect the way he sees light. ‘A patch of wind can change the texture of the water, and if I can see those subtle changes, then I can exploit it to my advantage on the racecourse,’ he says.

    Sailer Caleb Paine’s Sperry SeaHiker boots, designed with GripX3 rubber for traction on a wet boat. Sperry is the main sponsor of the US Sailing Team.

    Caleb Paine’s neoprene sailing pants have extra padding for ‘hiking out’— leaning back hard over the gunwale to use his body weight as a counterbalance to the wind, while holding onto the mainsheet and tiller to steer the boat ever faster.

    Sailor Caleb Paine’s digital compass. International sailing rules allow some digital devices during a sailing race, but smartphones and other communication devices are prohibited. ‘You’re totally on your own; it’s just you and the boat out there,’ Mr. Paine says.

    Sailor Caleb Paine packs extra ropes in case he needs to repair any of the eight lines that control different parts of his Finn sailboat.

    Caleb Paine’s toolbox includes plenty of pulleys and shackles by Harken, another team sponsor.
    Sailor Caleb Paine’s wind direction indicator, one of the few tech instruments allowed during a race.
    Caleb Paine usually travels with two extra sails for his Finn boat, including this Olympic sail by North Sails, constructed with Mylar and other advanced lightweight materials.

    The Finn is considered one of the most athletically demanding boats because of moves like this: Caleb Paine hikes out over the side, using his body as a counterbalance in a strong wind during a 2015 Olympic test event in Rio de Janeiro.
    Dozens of Finn boats line up for a Sailing World Cup Series regatta in HyŤres, France, in 2015. ‘It’s a fleet full of dudes, and we’ve all pretty much raced against each other before,’ Mr. Paine says. ‘There’s always banter.’

    Caleb Paine, a 25-year-old Finn class sailor from San Diego, pictured on the marina at Club Nautico El Arenal in Mallorca, Spain, in April, days after earning his spot on the US Olympic Sailing Team bound for the 2016 Summer Games. This will be his first Olympics.

    Dozens of Finn boats line up for a Sailing World Cup Series regatta in HyŤres, France, in 2015. ‘It’s a fleet full of dudes, and we’ve all pretty much raced against each other before,’ Mr. Paine says. ‘There’s always banter.’ WILL RICKETSON/US SAILING TEAM SPERRY Caleb Paine, a 25-year-old Finn class sailor from San Diego, pictured on the marina at Club Nautico El ... American sailor Caleb Paine spends about nine months of the year traveling for sailing events. His watertight backpack holds essentials like extra warm clothes and food during a race. PEP BONET FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL Sailor Caleb Paine’s toolbox contains screwdrivers, wrenches, knives, ropes and pulleys for making repairs to his Finn sailboat. He will be sailing for the U.S.A in the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. PEP BONET FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL To keep sun and rain off his face, Caleb Paine wears his lucky San Diego Padres baseball cap; he rarely wears sunglasses because they affect the way he sees light. ‘A patch of wind can change the texture of the water, and if I can see those subtle changes, then I can exploit it to my advantage on the racecourse,’ he says. PEP BONET FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL Sailer Caleb Paine’s Sperry SeaHiker boots, designed with GripX3 rubber for traction on a wet boat. Sperry is the main sponsor of the US Sailing Team. PEP BONET FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL Caleb Paine’s neoprene sailing pants have extra padding for ‘hiking out’— leaning back hard over the gunwale to use his body weight as a counterbalance to the wind, while holding onto the mainsheet and tiller to steer the boat ever faster. PEP BONET FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL Sailor Caleb Paine’s digital compass. International sailing rules allow some digital devices during a sailing race, but smartphones and other communication devices are prohibited. ‘You’re totally on your own; it’s just you and the boat out there,’ Mr. Paine says. PEP BONET FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL Sailor Caleb Paine packs extra ropes in case he needs to repair any of the eight lines that control different parts of his Finn sailboat. PEP BONET FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL Caleb Paine’s toolbox includes plenty of pulleys and shackles by Harken, another team sponsor. Sailor Caleb Paine’s wind direction indicator, one of the few tech instruments allowed during a race. Caleb Paine usually travels with two extra sails for his Finn boat, including this Olympic sail by North Sails, constructed with Mylar and other advanced lightweight materials.

    The Finn is considered one of the most athletically demanding boats because of moves like this: Caleb Paine hikes out over the side, using his body as a counterbalance in a strong wind during a 2015 Olympic test event in Rio de Janeiro. Dozens of Finn boats line up for a Sailing World Cup Series regatta in HyŤres, France, in 2015. ‘It’s a fleet full of dudes, and we’ve all pretty much raced against each other before,’ Mr. Paine says. ‘There’s always banter.’

    Caleb Paine, a 25-year-old Finn class sailor from San Diego, pictured on the marina at Club Nautico El Arenal in Mallorca, Spain, in April, days after earning his spot on the US Olympic Sailing Team bound for the 2016 Summer Games. This will be his first Olympics.

    Most days, Caleb Paine spends a few hours suspended off the side of his boat, inches from the waves. In the sailing world, it is called hiking: When the wind picks up and the sailboat starts to tilt, Mr. Paine will hook his feet into loops fixed to the deck—called hiking straps—and lean back hard over the gunwale, using his body weight as a counterbalance. He’ll hang onto the mainsheet and tiller to steer the boat ever faster. Getting soaked is often part of the deal.

    “My boat class is especially popular in Eastern and Northern Europe, so many of our championships are in places that are pretty frigid,” Mr. Paine says. “I never take the sun for granted.”

    The 25-year-old skipper from San Diego just earned a spot on Team USA for the coming 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. He has been training with the U.S. sailing team for six years. This will be his first Olympics.

    At 6-foot-3-inches and 220 pounds, Mr. Paine competes in the heavyweight dinghy division, Finn class. The Finn is a one-man boat with a 15-foot hull and a single sail.

    With the international sailing schedule, he only gets about three months a year in his beloved Southern California. He spent most of March in southern Spain for the Finn European Championship, where he secured his spot in Rio by beating his mentor and former training partner, 2008 Olympic silver medalist Zach Railey. Then it was off to HyŤres, France, in April for the Sailing World Cup. In December, the U.S. sailing team went to Brazil to train in Guanabara Bay, site of the Olympic races. They fly there again on Wednesday.
    Despite reports of questionable water quality in Rio’s harbor, Mr. Paine says he isn’t worried. “I wash my sailing gear every day. We’ve been going down there for three years now, and I’ve had no problems whatsoever.”

    He has pared down his life to four pieces of luggage: sailing bag, toolbox, small duffel and a backpack. Things have to be water tight.

    To save on shipping costs and time, Mr. Paine has three boats stashed around the world: San Diego, Barcelona and Rio.

    His sailing bag holds a life jacket, wetsuits and neoprene “hiking pants” fitted with extra padding on the rear. He also packs two sails for different wind conditions, spare ropes and plenty of pulleys for repairs.
    The Finn is considered one of the most athletically demanding boats because of the acrobatics and stamina required to maneuver it. Mr. Paine estimates that he burns about 10,000 calories every day that he’s sailing.
    On the boat, he wears Sperry deck shoes or sailing boots for traction. (Sperry is the title sponsor of the US Sailing Team.) To keep sun and rain off his face, Mr. Paine wears his lucky San Diego Padres baseball cap.
    In some ways, sailing has resisted the digital revolution. Mr. Paine can carry some techie instruments, like his Raymarine TackTick digital compass and a wind direction indicator, but smartphones are prohibited. Coaches and sailors aren’t allowed to communicate during a race. “It’s just you and the boat out there,” Mr. Paine says. “It’s great because you know the best athlete wins, not the best technology.”

    He started sailing at 2 weeks old when his father, Doug, a schoolteacher who loved the water, put newborn Caleb in a backpack and rigged up a suspension system in the cockpit of his 25-foot sailboat. The pair still sail together when they can.

    Mr. Paine says he feels fortunate to have grown up near San Diego’s Mission Bay Yacht Club, though he never really felt part of the yachting set. “Let’s face it, sailing is an affluent sport, and my dad was a teacher and my mom was a nurse,” he says.

    He has been supporting himself through a combination of private donors, commercial sponsorships and performance-based grants from the U.S. sailing team.

    After the Olympics, Mr. Paine says he will continue to work toward his bachelor’s degree at the California State University Maritime Academy, where he is studying marine engineering. And he has his sights set on the Volvo Ocean Race, a round-the-world event that takes nine months to complete.

    An adventurous spirit runs in the family. Last year, Doug Paine completed the Singlehanded Transpac Yacht Race, sailing solo from San Francisco to Honolulu.

    Lately, the younger Mr. Paine has been carrying around the book “Footsteps on the Ice,” based on the diaries of his grandfather Stuart D. Paine, who served as a dog-sled driver and navigator for Admiral Richard Byrd’s 1933 expedition to Antarctica—at age 22. “I hope that I have at least a little bit of what he had in me,” Mr. Paine says.
    Last edited by Philpott; 05-12-2016 at 09:46 AM.

  2. #2
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    Congratulations to Caleb for taking the Bronze!

    For those not paying attention, Doug was hanging about the start of this years SHTP helping Barry Bristol get set up and off the dock.

    DH

  3. #3
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    Caleb fought hard and pulled it off in the end. Clearly he did not inherit his father's sailing ability as I was DFL and proud to be so. Saw Barry for the first time since the race last Thursday, and it seems it was a really tough slog this year. Congratulations to Dave for an outstanding performance (going south toward a hurricane does require some fortitude) and to all who raced this year. See you all in 2018.
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    Congratulations to Caleb for taking the Bronze!

    For those not paying attention, Doug was hanging about the start of this years SHTP helping Barry Bristol get set up and off the dock.

    DH

  4. #4
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    Well, I myself have read every word I could find written about Caleb, even that snarky stuff on Sailing Anarchy. Best to read different perspectives about everything so I can make up my own mind. Good on him for keeping his focus and staying the course. An Olympic medalist in the family. Wow! That's something for him to keep close to his heart for the rest of his life. And you, too, Stan. And now: Is he interested in singlehanding across an ocean?

  5. #5
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    A good write-up on Caleb's medal-winning, heart-break to podium performance in Scuttlebutt

    http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/20...orite-moments/

  6. #6
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    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgmo View Post
    A good write-up on Caleb's medal-winning, heart-break to podium performance in Scuttlebutt

    http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/20...orite-moments/
    Wow that's terrific!

  7. #7
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    Wow this is amazing News! Congrats Caleb!

    I had the pleasure of sitting next to Doug at the brunch and getting caught up in the excitement.

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