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Thread: IOR & MORC event in SF?

  1. #11
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    Other IOR boats.

    Ranger 28, very different from the earlier Ranger 29 - both by Gary Mull. This is an IOR-type half-ton hull.



    I don't find this to be a grossly distorted hull shape. The rudder is on a substantial skeg, which might affect its efficiency but also adds strength. Note that the Mull designed Ranger 28 is NOT the same thing at all, at all as the Philip Rhodes designed boat of the same name.



    Typical early IOR-type transom a la Doug Peterson, though this is a San Juan 28, not designed by him. Note that a Hawkfarms butt looks a lot like this.



    Nelson-Marek 36..



    This is a Farr 727, one of Bruce Farrs most successful designs. It's an IOR quarter-tonner, though an early one, and not at all what I'd call "distorted". There's still a strong 727 association in New Zealand. 727's won the quarter-ton worlds for a couple of years until some more specialized designs came along.





    CCA boats

    Bristol 29


    Pearson Renegade (always liked these.....one of the first split-underboady sailboats)



    IMS boat... see how "squared off" the stern is?

    Last edited by AlanH; 09-21-2016 at 09:48 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  2. #12
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    Anyway,to get back to the original question, would be interested in MORC, but no have the $$ to fulfill the Coast Guard requirements for playing in the ocean.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  3. #13
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    Thanks Alan. Nice to have you back in the building.

    If you do ever get the bug to do a race out the Gate, you can probably borrow most of what you need. Another boat currently has my second set of flares, I have a MOB pole I'm not using, VHF radios are cheap, etc.

  4. #14
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    Alan,

    Thanks from a relative newbie for the clearest explanation I have ever read on the evolution of the various racing classes. I sail what I now understand to be a typical MORC boat, a Capo 30. Going back to the original question on this thread of reviving local racing under MORC, my question is how would it be functionally different than racing under PHRF? If we take the results of the last few SSS or fully-crewed YRA or OYRA races and re-scored them under MORC, how would the outcomes change? Would "MORC racing" be limited to boats designed to the MORC rule? Would newer and older designs be excluded because they fall outside of some kind of box rule? Forgive me if the question is na´ve (or stupid). I like the idea of racing under more restricted classes to make it closer to one design (i.e. the SF 30 "class"), but I am curious as to how it would work in practice.

  5. #15
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    Thanks for the history Alan. I think Fastnet and Santa Cruz ULDBs helped kill IOR. I was a part owner in a SC27 and ran the aft cockpit in a 1 Tonner in early 80s.

    If SSS doesn't pick this activity up, or you want an easy proof of concept- look into Interclub races
    cheers
    bob

  6. #16
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    There was talk of doing something similar several years ago. I remember because I looked at the spec's for my 30 footer and realized that except for the sprit and a-sails it could actually be measured in to the MORC rule. In the old days that's what would have been required - lots of measurements by a hopefully sober measurer with a slide rule, abacus and comptometer. While there are a handful of these boats around that still have their old ratings, there aren't enough to get this going.

    Ted, can you elaborate on this? "participation based on mixed IOR/IRC ratings, try to group within logical classes"

    (All in response to Tom's questions.)

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by K38Bob View Post
    Thanks for the history Alan. I think Fastnet and Santa Cruz ULDBs helped kill IOR. I was a part owner in a SC27 and ran the aft cockpit in a 1 Tonner in early 80s. If SSS doesn't pick this activity up, or you want an easy proof of concept- look into Interclub races cheers bob
    In 2015, at Ray Irvine's request, Interclub invited singlehanders to have their own division. Except DM was the only one who signed up. Then she un-signed up and I raced on Crews Nest instead. The Interclub series is generally on Saturdays and not on SSS Saturdays.

  8. #18
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    Back in the day, our local MORC fleet was called MORA. I actually never participated, but I remember the race notices. I bet some other old SSS farts with more experience than I have will remember. Out of the ashes of MORA arose OYRA,

    I honestly do not know if MORA used the MORC measurement rule to develop handicaps. The MORC "rule" is public knowledge, and though I don 't know the details but I DO know that it's a hull-rig measurement rule, which PHRF is not. For this to officially work, there would have to be a couple of people in the Bay Area who are certified MORC measurers. Now, realizing that paying someone to come out and measure your boat is a PITA, I believe that MORC maintains a database of stock designs and you pay them a fee, swear on your grandma's grave that your boat is "stock" and they hand you a rating. Remember that MORC is for <30 foot boats, and so actually Pretty Penny and Lively Lady wouldn't get to play, as they're a scooch over 30 feet.

    EDIT: Now I read that the MORC rule was expanded at some point up to just below 34 feet...but this is news to me.

    I don't know anything about IRC, but you can read about it, here - http://www.ussailing.org/racing/offshore-big-boats/irc/

    I don't think IRC ever had any real traction here on the Bay, but it's the primary "big boat" handicapping system in the UK right now I think.

    ========================

    The 1979 Fastnet race certainly did no favors to the IOR...no question about it.
    Last edited by AlanH; 09-21-2016 at 01:26 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  9. #19
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    Also, some of us will remember the late 90's, early 2000's "IOR Warhorse" bunch on the Bay. These were guys that had, generally speaking, bigger racing boats that had been designed near the end of the IOR era. I think they had a lot of fun, but my perception was that the people involved didn't really have the stupendous budget that is required to keep a boat like that going at a really high level, and so the racing was fun but at a lower-pressure level. I think the Warhorses bunch faded out sometime after I sold Ankle Biter...

    I note that in the UK, there are still active Quarter-Ton and Half-Ton classes. The boats do OK under IRC I think, and they do a few "IOR-only" events every year. The issues of competetiveness remain.... A Ron Holland designed, 1973 Silver Shamrock gets killed by a Dubois, 1988-designed half-tonner but yet they rate in the same band.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  10. #20
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    I sailed MORA (Midget Offshore Racing Association) in my Coronado 25 & Newport 30 (and as crew on other boats) during the 1970/80s. We used the NCPHRF Ratings. They were looooong ocean races, often with finishes after midnight or even the next day. Finding Duxbury at night in the fog before GPS was an adventure! Ditto for rounding the "invisible" LNB Lightbucket with its horn beeping away. RDF was at best a wild guess at locating where you were. Several times we anchored around the corner from the South Tower awaiting the Flood to flush us in at 0200. The old StFYC had a surplus Navy spotlight on their race deck. You could light up Sausalito with it. I remember many "blinding" MORA finishes when they flicked it on to illuminate the sail numbers. I usually recovered my night vision in time to miss running into the Harding Rock Buoy on the way back to Sausalito. Actually now that I think about it I'm lucky to still be here writing this.

    In the 1990 era, you could pick up an old IOR Warhorse with a container filled with a ton of sails pretty cheap. They were purchased, raced until the container was empty and then sat around growing barnacles. Several were modified into cruising boats, usually with a change in the rig and the addition of some semi-human living space. I see one come up on Craigs List from time to time. Still pretty cheap; still pretty uncomfortable and expensive to sail.

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