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Thread: LongPac 2017 Tracking and Position Reporting + Chatter

  1. #41
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    Lol, you're right, thanks, Bill. Enjoyed seeing your picture and reading a bit about your cruising experience in this months latitude. Lovely family.

    Quote Originally Posted by pogen View Post
    for a blistering 7.3 kt VMG average over 400 nm.
    Dang. Congrats 6 Brothers.

  2. #42
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    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    POSITION REPORT 7 July 2000hrs

    SIX BROTHERS finish 16:46:18
    GREEN BUFFALO finish 19:12:45

    ALTHEA, JACQUILENE RET

    RIFF RIDER, no exact report, but 30 nm W of Farallones

    JOU JOU is having rudder trouble and may divert to Monterey.

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  3. #43
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    The Buffalo is put to bed and the skipper just took a shower and wolfed down an In N Out cheeseburger (with onions). All is good in the world (at least for a moment).

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimQuanci View Post
    The Buffalo is put to bed and the skipper just took a shower and wolfed down an In N Out cheeseburger (with onions). All is good in the world (at least for a moment).
    Well done Jim and The Buffalo!! Congrats!!

  5. #45
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    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    Great job Jim!

    Reported that JOU JOU is motoring back to SF after equipment issues.

    GALAXSEA and RIFF RIDER can be seen on VesselFinder about 4 nm W. of Point Bonita, apparently with no wind.

    TORTUGA and NIGHTMARE are both about 35 nm out.

    Fleet should be all finished before late afternoon I guess.

  6. #46
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    The weather was kind to the RC too!

  7. #47
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    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    POSITIONS 8 July 0800



    Crinan 2 finished at 08:20:31

    JOU JOU Retired officially at 01:20; inbound under power

    most are outside the gate, waiting for breeze

    positions will be posted later after some errors are fixed.

  8. #48
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    As the last boats are creeping in... a little blow by blow...

    Prestart...
    Expedition forecast a a quick race... GB finish 8pm or so...just before sunset... based on GRIBS that showed 10-20k on the way out and 15-30k on the return. And the wind being westerly going out - making it hard to go due west - and NW on the return - so coming back from a bit south would be a reach. So for the heavy small rig Cal 40 it would be the upper range of the #1 going out and big jib top coming back. So that was the plan. But it was questionable if it could be done without changing down to the #3 at some point.

    Port side of line favored... wanted to port tack start but misjusged the flood and came in a bit late... though late being insude and ahort tacking off crissy paid dividends. Hit the south tower close... so decision time... go out north or south side? There was early ebb and decent breeze at the south side... the route target was 37-25 which is a tad south... the north side looked like lighter air... and the flood would be a lift exiting on the south side (vs a header exiting north side). So south side it was. Almost got out without tacking at the south tower but ended up well inside Mile Rock and a wee bit too close to the bricks. One short tack out and then back to starboard till the turning mark..hard on the wind in 10k-14k for the first 10 miles not laying the mark... and as the wind slowly swung north gradually coming up to the mark. Passed a few miles south of the Farralons now with the #1 on an outside lead with AWA of 40-50 degrees - and stayed that way till 10am Thursday when wind lightened to 10k - so up goes the jib top - knowing it was the right sail for the beam reach home. The #1 was a bit touch and go at times when the wind got as high as 20k but being cracked off 15 degrees made it doable (and changing from the #1 to the #3 alone at night in 20k is to be avoided). The forecast said no more then 20k the first night... fingers crossed.

    During the change to the jib top noticed the halyard was a bit chewed up so cut a foot off the halyard and bowline to the jib top head.

    Oh...
    Changing from a #1 to a 155% jib top quickly is a bit of a wrestle and firedrill. Was soaking wet with sweat by the time I was done.

    Thursday was a beautiful blue sky almost warm day. Ate a bit for the first time (though still on the 2 bonine per day regimen).

    Rounded the mark at 36-19 at 4pm. My target was 36-25 but keeping up the #1 forced me a bit further south. The router said a 10 minute loss but I wager an hour or two gain by keeping full speed with the #1 - 7k-8k.

    The way back was 65-90 AWA till inside the lightship. Wind averaged 24k with gusts as high as 29k. Again top end of the head sail - having to ease the jib top and vang while footing in the higher wind speeds. Steuggling to get north not wanting to end up gard on the wind the last 30 miles.

    Friday morning I am woken up from a nap by a "bang". Jib top going up the headstay... did the rack tear out? Lucky me it was just the tack shackle which was likely 30 years old. The waves were sizable and green water on deck from time to time so quick turn south to make biw work easy, run forward, ease jib halyard, hook up tack to spare shackle, halyard up, turn back to course... maybe 3 minutes... time to get back to napping.

    Zing.
    Now what?
    Jib top down and dragging alongside the boat. Broken halyard (that one I had shortened). Best to raise on the spare halyard while going a bit to weather so the jib lightly skidded on tbe bow wave. Got a bit fire hosed... which meant I really did have to finally change my underwear. Hope this halyard makes it all the way home...

    Funny feeling sitting below napping watching the boat being pooped a few times (cockpit full of water).

    Passed two mile to leeward of the Farrallons at 3pm... just like a SH Farallons race!

    And just like two ocean races earlier in the year the wind shut off just before Bonita. Was planning to ride early flood on the south side but saw a bit of wind on the north side so north I want (dodging 5 outbound ships in the process). Though almost no wind, the flood carried me in till near the bridge where the wind filled again to the finish. Last of the ebb in the middle under the bridge but strong wide early flood everywhere else. Debated hoisting the chute but with the shifting wind and good flood decided not too.

    Then hearing Ben and Lucy on the radio I just had to finish close to the bricks to give them a F2F.

    Now where was Six Brothers? This wasn't really there weather conditions being too much reach and almost no chute. But us SH just love to put the heat on the DH.


    As an aside...
    Otto (the Alpha autopilot) drove 54 of the 57 hours. The skipper slept 10 hours per day... in 30-60 minute chunks (have a love-hate relationship with the loud kitchen timer made for the hard of hearing).
    Only woken up once by the AIS proximity alarm.
    I need to figure out what is amiss with my AIS transponder as I had it on the while time... though Vessel Finder doesnt see me... MarineTraffic does.

  9. #49
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    That's a great report. Thanks for posting.
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  10. #50
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    Default From a small boat

    From a small boat

    I was really glad to actually sail after all the preparations. It was almost like going to Hawaii but with less water and food. Family also gave me half way packages, drawings and pictures to open every day.

    Had a good start and heard Al’s “Good Luck” from the race shore. That was nice to hear! Stayed out of the flood, few tacks as possible and see the scenic Marin coves. Quincy hit the South Tower a bit before I hit the North Tower. Single crew Express 27’s have a lot of leeway unless you sail them almost flat so I wanted to zig-zag the Marin headlands and make that last starboard tack at Pt. Bonita toward Farallones. Six Brothers had the same idea and sailed past me before the Bonita.

    I was still carrying the #1 about midway to Farallones before changing down to #3. I had Crazy Rhythm (Santa Cruz 27) on my starboard quarter close enough to see his red foulies in the cockpit. My friend would remain within visual sight all the way to the turnaround point. John and I would do an 8:30 vhf checkin twice a day all through the race. Meant a lot and helped keep me going.

    Day 1 was pleasant sailing out, only 1 head sail change from #1 to a #3, no Foulies needed, no water over the bow, dancing in the cockpit to B-52’s, good spirits. Mild winds and mild sea state. I could visually count 12 boats with the naked eye to the north, west and south & only about 5 miles apart. Quanci was way ahead and with 2 other tall masts possibly Don's Wiley 30 and Greg's Wilderness 30sx, two slow movers below were probably Tortuga and Daniel's "Imperial Cruiser". Six Brothers and another larger boat seemed to be high north above a Farallones track. Charles on Cal 40 Riff Rider passed me around the Farallones I believe. Before dark, took first reef and change down to #4. Must be approaching 20 knots.

    Some where between Evening 1 and Day 2, naturally conditions got rougher with wind and seas, so progressively changed down to 2 reefs and #4. Must have been 20-25 plus knots. Close reaching to stay upwind and keep Archimedes stable. Sea sickness was worse than usual even with the Scopolamine patch. The sea state was jostling my insides not just the usual up/down but the more sudden left/right. Puke Festival 2017 just started.

    But, not a problem, I prepared by hydrating and nourishing two days before so I was functional despite only eating one Mtn House spaghetti meal, one package Trader Joe’s turkey jerky, two tubes of crackers and ginger ale & water. But, I had to keep things simple. Not racing, just good seamanship.
    From Day 2 forward, Staying dry, warm and rested meant little time on deck as possible. Only reefing, lookout and main sheet control with AP driving. I kept two reefs and a #4. Once in a while thought about changing down to storm jib because it felt like 25 knots plus, but cracking off was better than walking the dark fore deck in the un-patterned waves.


    I made out Crazy Rhythm’s red bow light and mast strobe near the turnaround point and heard Carliane on Kyntanna was close by. I was rooting for her not just to finish but to do well toward Hawaii eventually. Long ago, she impressed me with her character. After a long solo sail from Hanalei and a tired evening arrival into the tricky Nawiliwili Harbor, she impressed me how she led others putting Archimedes away. She took care of her like her own and with familiarity. Making sure sails were properly folded, lines coiled, and nothing left amiss. Listening to her interact with the other SHTP vets, I told George Lythcott to keep an eye out on her, she will be significant competition in future SHTP’s, because she is not just a racer but a true sailor.


    Thank God for Auto Pilots. My Ray Marine ram is named “Rachel.” She has tanned to a gold/brown over time and has cradled me over 3000 miles safely. God bless her and the Hungarian hands who assembled her. Only a few times did she need my company in the worse winds and sea states. She drove and I trimmed the main in and out with puffs and waves.


    Sometimes, driving topside in the evening was beautiful. The moonlight on my starboard lee side, the beam reach speeds and the occasional roaring breaker. But, I had to keep my eyes in the back of my head so that I could crouch into a “wave body tuck” position and lessen the impact of breaking waves. I did not want to get body checked to the lee side, so mostly retreated to the cabin during the real nasty stuff. One thing that I always remember about overnight ocean races is that just like visiting a city, each quadrant of the sea is like a different city block with its changing feel and character. Most of the wind gusts seemed to stay below 30 knots, so happy to have no “howling sea desert” to morphi-phrase Mark Twain.

    My biggest concern was how much did I need to go upwind to return to SF versus how Archimedes wanted to sail. I ended up close reaching the early part of the return leg and beam reaching the rest. All possible since the wind lived up to forecasted shift left as we worked toward home.
    My second concern was squeezing between a night SE Farallones and western approach shipping channel during my most tired state. I stayed awake thru it and crashed slept once safely inside the light ship and well south of the return channel. When I got up in the dark morning, I was surprised how little progress I had made but too tired and nonchalant about unreefing the main, so back to sleep. By daylight morning and better rested, I wanted to get home so un-reefed, chuted up wind in light air and finally changed to a #1 on starboard tack from Bonita to the south tower. I was so focused on my drive that I scared a small fishing boat out of the way and in return a whale scared me by spouting a boat length off the starboard stern. The tail was curled about 10 feet away.

    Approaching the Red Gate, starboard beam reach to South Tower and into the security of the Inside Bay. I could let most of my guard down and be at ease. VHF Greetings from Brian on RedSky and visual greetings from the RC was nice. It was nice to see them on the way out, monitoring our progress, and to see them at the Finish. Thank you, Guys and Gals!!

    This race was different from other Long Pacs and the start of the 2014 Transpac. 2011 was frustrating, 2013 was scary windy and this one… fun to tolerable leg 1 and queasy, moony, jostling leg 2. It’s a tougher race that SHTP and is suppose to be. I trailed just behind Kyntanna and just a few hours before my friend John on his SC27 Crazy Rythm. Congratulations to you both, I see SHTP 2018 in your futures.

    I am still a little queasy on Sunday morning, so more “west & welaxation” as Elmer Fudd would say!

    Glad everyone is back in Safely, Can’t wait to hear the stories from the Other Nuts!

    P.S. John on the Santa Cruz 27 Crazy Rythm's is actually crazy (but hardcore) for going thru this gauntlet. A soaking, dodger-less ride and tight cramped quarters for a 6'2"
    Last edited by Submarino; 07-09-2017 at 03:15 PM.

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