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Thread: Around the World from West coast?

  1. #551
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    More good news for PJ, despite his lack of sleep, is that he ran 222 miles, 9.3 knot average, in the last 24 hours (1:15 pm to 1:15 pm). Winds have averaged 14-15 knots. from the north

    PJ's routing program is recommending a gybe south in the near future. We'll see what that brings. His SST (surface water temp) is currently 71 degrees. A hurricane needs ~79 degrees SST to maintain strength.
    Last edited by sleddog; 10-02-2020 at 01:55 PM.

  2. #552
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    These type of record attempts allow for outside weather routing, correct?

  3. #553
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    Quote Originally Posted by solosailor View Post
    These type of record attempts allow for outside weather routing, correct?
    Correct. Due to budget, PJ does not have a full time router, but is doing his own with Predict Wind. He's on the steep side of the learning curve. But aren't we all.

    Off to Yosemite. Depending on smoke, expect radio silence until?

  4. #554
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    Well using PredictWind is certainly much easier to use than Expedition but not legal for most racing as the routing is not done on the boat but using an outside server. I asked because I do recall others using outside weather routers when making record attempts.

  5. #555
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    1 vote for Sail Grib which works well with the Iridium Go, is a nice alternative to Predict Wind and Pac Cup/Transpac legal.
    It's not Expedition but it's easy to use and the price is right.

  6. #556
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    As long as the routing is done onboard and the GRIB public data then you're good to go.

  7. #557
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    He's makin' tracks. The concept of 220 mile days kinda blows me away. When he comes back I hope he takes Chanagabang on the next SHTP....records might fall. I mean...two days and he's almost 500 miles along the track on a course not all that different from a SHTP course.
    There is very little chance a Class 40 could break the Open 50 record of 8 days, 12 hours...... of course if the stars aligned it's possible. To give a comparison a much lighter, faster, longer, fully crewed J/125 won the Transpac overall with an elapsed of 8 days 16 hours. That would be hard to do on a fast year for a Class 40 solo. It's hard to believe how much harder a fully crewed boat can push, especially overnight.

  8. #558
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    Which autopilot(s) is he using?

  9. #559
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    Quote Originally Posted by todd22123 View Post
    Which autopilot(s) is he using?
    There is redundancy, of course, but I personally witnessed use of a Pelagic in the Half Moon Bay harbor. Philippe wrote about all that in an earlier post on his tracker/blog: https://pjsails.com/tracker/

  10. #560
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    Below is solely my impression. I haven't talked with PJ about his motivations. They are in his blog.

    We know PJ has the "Explorer's Gene," a vital component of his adventure/dream.
    PJ also graciously and characteristically downplays any attempts at establishing a sailing record(s). You won't hear this from him.

    But there is reason to be aboard a fast, performance, 40 footer, that has to do with his unmentioned competitive gene.

    A fast boat can be sailed fast, which contrary to expectation, can lessen loads, especially downwind, as 75% of his route will be. And needs less sail to sail upwind. In addition, a 150 day, 21,600 nautical mile passage, can be more endurable than 250 days. Watermaker? We ain't got no stinkin' watermaker. (although he may wish he did.)

    Unofficially, here is another reason, other than minimizing interaction with hurricanes, cyclones, and Southern Ocean gales, why PJ is sailing fast....

    The WSSRC (World Sailing Speed Record Council) ratifies non-stop circumnavigations and their fastest standard to date.

    CHANGABANG is potentially, and unofficially, in the running for 1) first, solo, non-stop, East to West, circumnavigation from SF to SF. (not yet a WSSRC category, but could become a new "benchmark" time.)

    2) Fastest, non-stop, solo circumnavigation for a boat 40 feet and under. This WSSRC record is currently held by the late Guo Chuan, West to East, on a sistership to CHANGABANG. GC's time was 137 days, 20 hours. PJ could approach this record going around the other way. But it will be hard to break. That's a 6.6 knot, great circle, average for 21,600 miles. Actual sailed distance likely greater.

    3) Lastly, PJ could break Bill Hatfield's recent record and epic East to West solo circumnavigation for a boat 40 feet and under. Hatfield's benchmark time is 258 days, an average speed of 3.48 knots.

    But first he has to finish. And that is a Challenge. We wish Phillipe good sailing. CHANGABANG should be a giggle in the tradewinds. His recent counter-clockwise navigation around Hurricane, then Tropical Storm Marie was masterful and will act as a slingshot towards the ITCZ. Well done, Good Sir.
    Last edited by sleddog; 10-09-2020 at 08:09 PM.

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