Page 24 of 29 FirstFirst ... 14202122232425262728 ... LastLast
Results 231 to 240 of 281

Thread: Around the World from West coast?

  1. #231
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Redwood City
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lanikai View Post
    I vote roundtheglobe.com. Says it all, and gives you flexibility - for example, if you end up doing something that isn't exactly sf2sf (e.g. HI-HI, a la Webb Chiles).
    And you can re-use it when you break another record by re-tracing your route in a hot air balloon, or use your newfound fame to start a sat-com company, or a snow globe company. The possibilities are endless, as long as they involve a globe!
    That's funny :-)

    Would someone in San Diego be willing to check a couple boats for me?
    https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/199...dard%20listing
    https://www.yachtfindersbrokerage.co...ornia-7021602/
    I just would like for a fellow singlehander to step on and tell me if she/he feels about the boat's state ....
    P___/)___J

  2. #232
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alameda CA
    Posts
    313

    Default

    not in SD so I'm no help with the immediate request, though I do have some peanut gallery musings...
    I hate to harp on the same theme, but having been core crew for 9 years on a local IMX 38, including a BBS win, I'd be hesitant about that one.
    1. they are extremely weight sensitive; by which I mean they are both tippy (somewhat) but also trim wise (eg we could gain or lose .3 knot depending on where the crews butts landed... "1/2 cheek forward please", etc).
    I'd be a bit concerned with how the supplies, gear etc would affect performance. Having said that we regularly sailed with ~1600lbs of movable ballast... so long as you're up for stacking...
    2.If your not planning to sail with the kite up, forget about downwind performance. The fractional jib is completely useless, even winged out in 25knots. How do I know this? watching everyone else walk away after we blew up the second kite half way back from the bucket.
    3. lastly, the stock rudder is extremely high aspect... not sure how that would do with an AP.

    all of that having been said, X yachts have a reputation as very well built boats.
    If you do decide to pursue it, have the surveyor take as hard a look as possible at the keel frame - X yachts had (have?) a galvanized steel grid that the keel is attached to which is completely encased in fiberglass. I have never heard of this presenting a problem, but it might be worth some research...

    .02
    DH

  3. #233
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Redwood City
    Posts
    621

    Default

    All excellent points! Although I do like being .3 kts faster, I am looking at speed outside of any handicap. In other words if this boat's speed can vary between 7 and 7.6 upwind, it's still better than 6.5.
    About downwind without a kite I wonder what was the speed with the small jib poled out in 25 kts? Was it 8, 7, 6?
    Would you singlehand that boat, including flying the kite?
    P___/)___J

  4. #234
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alameda CA
    Posts
    313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jamottep View Post
    Would you singlehand that boat, including flying the kite?
    short answer; no, not for any appreciable distance.
    At least not without some pretty extensive reworking to the deck layout. But you may be planning on that.

    there are some fundamental architectural issues:
    The cockpit is very shallow to non-existant (its really just a concave depression), the giant wheel that is half in a well gets in the way of getting either to the winches or to a decent steering position.(also, items dropped can and have landed in the wheel well and jammed things up; very exciting).
    you can dispense as the spreaders are very swept back, so that helps.

    It's a very fun boat to sail with 7-9.
    it would be more than a handful for 1.

    DH

  5. #235
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,163

    Default

    I'm going to quote someone that we all know, who is on this forum. I like this guy, he's a good dude. He's won a LOT of singlehanded races. He builds stuff. He knows more about Ocean Planet's guts than anybody but Bruce Schwab and I have never beaten him, not ONE time on the race course. Yet he's got no "attitude" and he said something to me once that I have never forgotten. Here's a quote, or close enough.

    It's not how fast you can go, it's how long you can go fast.

    Philippe, you'll do what you want, but if I were you, I would say "Screw the 0.3 knots, I want a boat that will GET ME AROUND". Because a really fast boat that goes fast for a week or two or three or ten, isn't going to get you what you want. A really fast boat that takes ten people to make go fast, isn't gonna do it.

    There. I've said it. I'll go back to lurk mode, again.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  6. #236
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Redwood City
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    I would say "Screw the 0.3 knots, I want a boat that will GET ME AROUND". Because a really fast boat that goes fast for a week or two or three or ten, isn't going to get you what you want. A really fast boat that takes ten people to make go fast, isn't gonna do it.
    I agree. I want a boat that will make it through. Maybe my thinking is flawed. I don't think that fast boats get to their speed non linearly. I don't think there is a magic threshold where the boat will go from slow to fast. An Olson 30 with a double reef and #4 in 15 knots of wind will still be fairly fast upwind compared to a heavy displacement boat of same water length, which would have to carry full mainsail and a #1. To me the Olson 30 seems to be the easier boat to sail. I'm not trying to win a PHRF race where I would have to push the boat to its maximum speed. I mean, it's like, what's easier to make go fast: a heavy boardwalk cruiser with fat tires, or a lightweight road bike? That's how I'm thinking about this. If this thinking is flawed please jump in. I'm still a newbie and don't know much about boat design.
    P___/)___J

  7. #237
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Offshore passage time is more correlated to LWL than displacement which is behind Alan’s wise input. The exception to this is heavy air downwind sailing when surfing and planing arise. You may also be underestimating the amount of weight for gear and provisions and it’s impact on the light boats you are looking at.

    I struggle to provide more input as your goals and proposed route are unclear to me.

  8. #238
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Redwood City
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ragnar View Post
    I struggle to provide more input as your goals and proposed route are unclear to me.
    Complete something like this, solo, non stop, going West:
    Name:  world-ocean-maps-1.jpg
Views: 53
Size:  99.6 KB
    P___/)___J

  9. #239
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,163

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jamottep View Post
    I agree. I want a boat that will make it through. Maybe my thinking is flawed. I don't think that fast boats get to their speed non linearly. I don't think there is a magic threshold where the boat will go from slow to fast. An Olson 30 with a double reef and #4 in 15 knots of wind will still be fairly fast upwind compared to a heavy displacement boat of same water length, which would have to carry full mainsail and a #1. To me the Olson 30 seems to be the easier boat to sail. I'm not trying to win a PHRF race where I would have to push the boat to its maximum speed. I mean, it's like, what's easier to make go fast: a heavy boardwalk cruiser with fat tires, or a lightweight road bike? That's how I'm thinking about this. If this thinking is flawed please jump in. I'm still a newbie and don't know much about boat design.

    Maybe it would be wise to do a passage on a heavier displacement cruising-type boat with a fair bit of waterline. A Valiant 40 will not be as fast as a Class 40. But it will get you there and you don't have the budget for a class 40.

    Philippe, if I may suggest, you're asking the wrong question. The first question should be.. 1: what boat can I afford that will actually go all the way around the world, nonstop?

    The second question is NOT, emphatically NOT "how fast will it go?". The question should be..."How hard is it to make go some-kind-of-fast for a very long time?"... Pick a boat which is easy to sail to it's potential for weeks on end, not the boat with the highest top-end speed.

    NOW I'll shut up.
    Last edited by AlanH; 03-30-2019 at 10:43 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  10. #240
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jamottep View Post
    Complete something like this, solo, non stop, going West:
    Name:  world-ocean-maps-1.jpg
Views: 53
Size:  99.6 KB
    I see, and what is your goal? Set a benchmark for the route? Just finish? Get experience? Personal journey of discovery? The why is not an easy question, and for me a complex one.

    Comments on the route: It looks like a lot of lighter air, and while I've not been there it looks like you may have a lot of sleepless days & nights as you approach and go over Australia due to traffic. As you head around Cape Horn after all those miles and wear, you may find yourself wanting some displacement.

    Hal Roth sailed a strengthened Santa Cruz 50 around the world in the '86 BOC, I think it was. He sold the boat and bought a Pretorian 35. When asked why he sold the Santa Cruz 50 he said: "It didn't give enough back."

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •