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Thread: Around the World from West coast?

  1. #391
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    Quote Originally Posted by pogen View Post
    Isn't a West circumnavigation doing it the hard way?
    All I know about the course can be found here: https://pjsails.com/the-course-to-sa...und-the-world/

    I must say that after watching forecasts for the past 4 months I'm less optimistic about the course having lots of downwind legs.
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  2. #392
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    pogen is offline Sailing canoe "Kūʻaupaʻa"
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    Joshua Slocum went West, and I remember reading in his book that this was the hard way. Capt. Bligh of the Bounty tried to sail from England to Tahiti going West, spent a month trying to beat past Cape Horn, gave up, and then turned East to pass south of Africa. The Volvo and Vendee Globe both go east. I'm sure you have thought about all this.

  3. #393
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    Oh yeah it'll be hard all right. In fact it's good that I'm an ignoramus. Otherwise I would not have started this. The web is full of horror stories of eastbound circumnavigations. But since very few go West the little I read was not as intimidating. Foolish ...
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  4. #394
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    Well, it's been quite tedious downloading all the Navionics subscription charts for this course ... Several days into it and I can now say that I've got it all on one device. Two more to go ... Now, I also did some research and this is what I got so far: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1xS...Ez&usp=sharing
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  5. #395
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    The course will have a lot of upwind....so you want a boat that can take it in the face for days on end.

    but you know this.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
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  6. #396
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    The amount of time I'm wasting with Navionics charts it's inhumane ... After a full week I've only been able to get the charts for the course on an iPad. On an Android everything goes to hell ... This is driving me nuts!
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  7. #397
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    Monsieur, what delicious freeze-dried food is tempting your tastebuds today?

  8. #398
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    Monsieur, what delicious freeze-dried food is tempting your tastebuds today?
    We tried pad Thai with chicken yesterday, which I also had on the way to Hawaii. It's good ... And it was a reminder of how it's going to be sloshy for a long time. I'm trying to think if there any hard biscuits that hold for long, don't taste too bad and will give my teeth a work out :-)
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  9. #399
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    I’ll make some hard tack, add dried cranberries, bring it to the 3 Bridge awards meeting Wed night.

  10. #400
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    The course will have a lot of upwind....so you want a boat that can take it in the face for days on end.
    Though I have not spoken with PJ regarding his proposed route nor timing, I have studied pilot charts, taken world ocean weather classes, and sailed much of his route from California to Australia.

    It's surprising to many how much potential off-the-wind sailing PJ could encounter. Certainly most of the way from SF to Torres Straits is in the tradewind belt, good for CHANGABANG. The Torres Straits is the first of 3 "weather gates" with the likelihood of light, variable winds, as well as seasonal cyclones after mid-November.

    Thence across the Indian Ocean as far as the Mascarene Islands, Mauritius and the southern tip of Madagascar is again in the tradewind belts...and then to the second gate, Cape Agulhas, as the southern tip of Africa. Getting around Agulhas will be a significant challenge for PJ, much upwind for the last 500 miles along the South African coast with potential post-frontal wind against Agulhas current. Fortunately there is relief from grief with nicely spaced, sheltered anchorages and buoys. Webb Chiles on his Moore-24 recently made this passage, albeit with stops, as well as once getting blown backwards 60 miles overnight.

    Once past Cape Agulhas/Cape of Good Hope, it is again tradewind sailing to reach South America and PJ's turning buoy off Argentina. This leg circles the South Atlantic high pressure counter clockwise, fair weather sailing with lighter winds near the center of the High.

    The passage down (up?) to Cape Horn will be into increasing southwest headwinds in the lee of the South American continent. This could be PJ's most difficult leg. But there are also anchorages of refuge and mooring buoys in both the Falkland Islands and along the mainland, as well as just inside the Straits of Magellan, if needed. (Note to PJ: don't trust those Danforth imitation French anchors...)

    Rounding Cape Horn east to west depends on catching a weather window when the prevailing westerlies in the Drake Passage are taking a nap. Though I would not suggest it without being able to power, PJ's route does not necessarily require leaving Cape Horn to starboard. He could go through the channels and fjords further north, or beat upwind through the Straits of Magellan, leaving Cape Horn to port. But then he doesn't get his earring, hihi.

    Once past the tip of South American, north of latitude 50 south, the westerlies increasingly fair and diminish in intensity. As well, the Humboldt Current provides a good push into the SE tradewind belt. No need to go close-hauled all the way to the ITCZ at 8-10 degrees N. Just follow the well trod "Clipper Route."

    Once in the NE trades, PJ is almost home free. Close reaching would have CHANGABANG leaving the Hawaiian Islands well to port (west). Approaching the Eastern Pacific High Pressure Ridge near 30N, he'd stick his bow into the High, tack to port, and close reach towards the barn.

    How much close-hauled is this guesstimation? Probably 25% of PJ's route is with the wind forward of abeam. About 6,000 miles....that's alot. But doable..In 1997 I sailed WILDFLOWER 6,000 miles mostly upwind from New Zealand to Santa Cruz, including 30 days on starboard tack..Had everything including the anchor, 50 feet of chain, folding bike, water jugs, and deflated dinghy hanging over the starboard side of my 27 footer. It took me several hours to tack nearing Kauai.
    Last edited by sleddog; 02-09-2020 at 10:30 PM.

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