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Thread: Farallones 2018

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    390

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    I've had good luck replacing a boom with an up-sized used boom from a Catalina 36. Presumably you would like to increase stiffness in the section (that or move the traveler into the cockpit). To increase stiffness increase the boom's top-to-bottom distance or height. Key detail is the gooseneck arrangement - ideally you want to match what is on the mast, or you want something new that will match the existing spar profile.

    Who built the existing mast and boom?

    LeFiell is/was a spar builder in Southern California, you might see if one of their off-the-shelf designs will fit Sweet Pea - hopefully they still build booms. Failing that, Buzz Ballenger in Watsonville can design and build a custom boom for you that will do everything you want.

    - rob/beetle

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    19

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    Hi,

    thank you all for the help!

    Sled-dog, you are right on, I switched the main to a loose-footed sail and, yes, she came with mid-boom sheeting. Nevertheless, crew error was the big problem, I should have chicken jibed or at least headed up before jibing. Now I know better.

    Actually the Islander 30-2 first came with end-boom sheeting but was switched to mid-boom sheeting very soon. Hard to reach the sheets from the tiller. When I am single handing I am using a second tackle for fine tuning that runs on a block and a dyneema line, attached to some reinforced cleats in the cockpit. Getting to sheet and traveler fast is critical in my boat, she will not react to the tiller at all if there is strong wind unless you depower the main first. Like on a schooner (Swee' Pea's given name is Schooner). I will think about moving the traveler to aft, not much space, though. Not sure if the original early 30-2 had a traveler at all.

    I walked by KKMI today, right next to my boat, they did not have a solution (and it would be expensive). LeFiell actually made the first spars for the Islander 30-2. Then Kenyon. I did not find any manufacturer info on my spars. I looked at the homepages, LeFiell does not mention boat spars at all (but has special settings for Netscape Navigator 3.0). Rig-Rite / Kanyon does have some profiles that may fit but are not exactly mine. Plus their email does not work, they did not pick up the phone, and their reputation is hit and miss. Buzz Ballenger has something on his webpage that might fit, I will call him tomorrow.

    I am all for saving money but would prefer a good quality used spar or a new spar over splicing the old one. I plan to do coastal sailing and racing with this boat for at least two more years, she may not be pretty but she is structurally sound, fun to sail and is currently better as a boat than I am as a sailor.


    Cheers

    Jan
    Last edited by hijan1; 05-21-2018 at 10:53 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Discovery Bay, CA
    Posts
    427

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    I had a pretty good, comfortable race. I didn't place all that well (as usual) but it was excellent practice for what is to come. Carried a double reef for the first 8 miles or so and shook it out when TWS dropped to 15Kts more or less. Unlike last race I did in 15 where I carried the reefs around the rock and all the way home. It was windier on the way out for that race but about the same coming back.

    But with that big main I had quite an interesting time at Pt. Bonita and on to the South Tower. I was broad reaching on port tack and got hit with a 25Kt gust. This rounded me up and I could not get the boat down. Finally I eased the main as much as was possible and got the boat headed to the gate. I was not in the mood to futz around with a reef. Probably should have given what happened next. So I am now about a mile or two past Point Bonita still on port tack but sailing in the lee in that crappy ebb seaway and get hit again with a 26 to 28 Kt gust. The boat goes into what could only be called a death roll... after the third of fourth undulation she rounds down and jibes. I am holding on and thinking "crap, something is bound to break and I have zero time before the SHTP". It was also bizarre to look at the boom pointing nearly perpendicular to the sea, yowza! But it turned out to be the softest jibe ever. By the time the jibe happened I was far enough up into the wind where the sail was back-winded and just settled into the new tack smooth as you please. So what the hell, might as well get the boat pointed back to the gate and press on and see how the starboard tack works. Answer, pretty much like the port tack. I continued toward the gate looking very much like the proverbial drunken sailor doing a wicked jibe every time a good gust came down. The under the bridge tourist boat actually came pretty close so the Captain could tell his guests "OK folks now watch this crazy dude kill himself ha ha ha". After experiencing the "exciting event" for the fourth time, I finally got some relief when I got under the bridge. It was still pretty windy but the swell had dropped considerably and things were more controllable.

    So it was an exciting time and a lot of good lessons learned. Come to think of it, I can't remember a single gate entry where some lesson or another was learned.
    Last edited by mike cunningham; 05-21-2018 at 11:33 PM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    23

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    This was my first go at a singlehanded race (last year drifter/dnf doesn't count for me). I picked up The Pork Chop Express late Friday from the rigger who took care of some small but important details (goose neck to boom fitting, mainsheet strop, mast chivs, backstay bridle among others). A bit of a scramble to put everything together including diving the boat at Pier 39 on a cold windy eve but it all came together.
    Started with single reef and 4 and carried this combo to the island. It was breezy and lumpy but quite manageable. Past the LB I was underpowered at times but held my ground and was ahead (at least in my class) at the rock. Nina came roaring up and took the inside lane with MC Irene nipping. I knew I didn't have enough to hold these 2 off without setting a kite but this was all about Pac Cup shakedown with no drama or breakage. I'm pretty new the E27 as well.
    Nina set shortly after rounding and off she went. PCX shook her reef in the lee and set the jib top. The sail back was pretty darn nice, alternating between AP and hand steer - this is a fun boat to drive after all!
    MCIrene caught us at the Lightbucket with an A5 tacked to the bow and continued on - it was easy letting her go knowing what was likely ahead.
    As we closed in on Bonita MCI was paying some dues and made it into a lee (either Bonita or Kirby) and we were closing fast topping out at 14. Honestly, I was relieved to see her pop back out with a jib up and head for the barn.
    Our white knuckle moment came with the jibe at the North Tower. I got greedy and passed up the last lull around Kirby thinking I'd get one more - not to be however. High 20's jibe went off without a hitch and the next 2 miles was pure glee. Boat under perfect control flying to the finish.
    Post finish I just let the Jib top halyard go and sailed ugly to P39. Hid behind P33 and set 2 reefs (hooray again for singleline) and sailed into the slip.
    Super happy with the boat set up. Everything worked and nothing broke. Boat was fast upwind and not a dog down - even under canvassed. Happy with my decisions this go round but will likely press harder in future solo efforts. On to the Islands!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Berkeley Marina
    Posts
    136

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    My mental strength is still very weak (read: I feel like a loser). .... I had high hopes and came back home sad....
    One beloved competitor we all know originally felt her story may not have been worthy as she DNF'd.
    What? You guys are rad! This is the second year where I thought I'd at least make it to the start but my boat was not prepared. Instead I was standing in the F dock parking lot in Berkeley consoling myself, thinking that even if the boat were ready, I'd probably end up DNF'ing anyway. Major kudos to those that tried, and extra kudos to those that finished. Somewhere in these threads is a very applicable rant about how even leaving the dock singlehanded makes you a legend on some level no matter what.
    These race reports are great, thank you all for sharing. I admit I had to google "jib top". Now I know.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,041

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    Absolutely! Very few boats on the Bay ever make it past the Golden Gate, let alone to the Farallones. And singlehanded - amazing!

    The Bay and coast off SF are some of the most challenging waters to sail in the world, yet it's our regular playground. Keep it up folks!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Berkeley Marina
    Posts
    136

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    I'm not sure if Steve Seal still sells spars, supplies, 'n stainless steel sailing sundries suiting Santanas especially (say that 10 times), Jan, but he might be someone to consult with on the boom project. He was a wealth of general rig and supplier information when he did things for my Tuna a few years ago.
    http://www.sealsspars.com/

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    19

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    Thank you for the tips! Greatly appreciated! So far Buzz Ballenger got back to me, his pricing is actually pretty reasonable compared to a Sparcraft boom that a friend just bought. 8 weeks, he said.... That is a lot of missed sailing. Gotta pull the trigger on that soon. Cheers Jan

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,144

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    Buzz is a good friend here and has done quality work for many years. As for missed sailing, I don't know your boat. But guessing the possibility of still sailing w/out a boom exists. Consider rigging a bridle from the rail or aft mooring cleats. Tie in a reef, or two, in the main. Place a block on the clew reef grommet and on bridle, and run a multi-part sheet from the bridle to the clew. From the bridle, the "mainsheet" could be run forward to a cockpit winch, or not.

    Not perfect, as fully easing the main is compromised. But works a treat for most points of sail from close-hauled to broad reach.

    If you are passing Capitola enroute to/from Watsonville, feel free to stop by the Capitola Boat Club .....I have extra blocks to pass on, if needed.

    ~sleddog eight three one four 75-0278

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,144

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    BLACK FEATHERS, a Cal-20, and vet of the 2008 SHTP, is a meticulously prepared, maintained, and seaworthy little ship with many coastal and ocean miles. And her skipper, Robert Crawford, is a savvy and experienced seaman with multiple Pacific crossings, Long Pacs, Farallons and other SSS races. Robert and Jeanne's book BLACK FEATHERS is as good as you'll find, and wonderful story about preparing and sailing a small boat out the front door of the Golden Gate and across a big ocean.

    Here's Robert's succinct description of last Saturday's attempted sail to the Farallones. He was doublehanded, and not an official race entry.

    My longtime taiko friend who often sails with me headed out to ride along with the SSS Farallones racers. If it weren't for the wave conditions, it would have been a great windy ride! As it was however, I soon realized that it was going to end up a long and tiring, and very wet fight out to the island. The ride back would have been fun however, as long as you paid attention to what is going on behind you.

    Our trip was a bit short...... We had a double reef in the main and were regularly getting splashed in the face before we got out the Gate. Once at the channel markers, it became clear that things were not going to relax any so I decided to pull the plug. Black Feathers was doing well with the waves, and certainly could have struggled through, but by the time we would have gotten out to the island, her crew would have been too tired and cold for a couple of retired guys! I must be getting soft. The fact that 10 or so SSS singlehanders also went home early somewhat helps the ego and eases the disappointment.
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-24-2018 at 09:22 AM.

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