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Thread: Surprise!

  1. #291
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    If the plywood isn't delaminating you could epoxy new veneer.
    I don't know this company. Just something I found.
    https://www.oakwoodveneer.com/teak-a...ly-veneer.html

  2. #292
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    Sep 2007
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    Thanks Greg. That's a good option that would keep the existing look. Any idea how you remove the old veneer? It appears to be well-bonded to the plywood.

    45 years ago, between the "5" and "10" soundings just E of Tinsley Island on Philpott's chart, a bunch of us were taught team and match racing by John Bertrand, Steve Jeppesen and the St. Francis YC training staff.
    .
    Last edited by BobJ; 04-26-2020 at 10:30 AM.

  3. #293
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    Thanks Greg. That's a good option that would keep the existing look. Any idea how you remove the old veneer? It appears to be well-bonded to the plywood.
    .
    The ticket for veneer removal is a belt sander, and as you're working on a flat surface you want to support the belt sander in a base that keeps the belt level to the surface you're sanding. I have a Bosch belt sander and frame, and it's wonderful for smoothing out bumps in large flatt-ish surfaces (such as boat decks, it's also sanded boards on a home deck):

    https://shop.bosch-professional.com/...rames--2608059

    - rob

  4. #294
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    What Rob said, though if the veneer is thick-ish, a power planer would do the job. After going over with the power planer, I'd be inclined to hit it with the belt sander and about 80-grit. Any new veneer would happily glue to that.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  5. #295
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    I would go the planer, sander route, the old veneer is probably only 1/32 thick.
    If it's not delaminating you could sand off the finish and glue on the new veneer and finish.
    Of course to save weight it should be completely removed!

  6. #296
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    Jul 2016
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    Bodfish, CA
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    This photo may be useful. There is no telling how many times this was sanded since 1979. Maybe everyone doesn't have section of teak and holly plywood that has been cut.
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  7. #297
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    That's interesting stuff - two thick layers and two thin layers. What's the coring material?

    Lonseal's sales manager and technical staff have accepted my amateur-installer status (or they have nothing better to do) and are being very helpful. They are presenting some alternatives that, while more labor-intensive, would make the finished job look more like the real thing.

    As I mentioned to Dazzler this morning, a big consideration is not ever having to do this again. We refinished Ragtime!'s cabin sole three times over the years but it was a much smaller area. I had Surprise!'s main cabin sole out again yesterday (chasing wiring) and it's a LOT of wood.

    It looks like I'll have to pull up the two halves of the sole in the forward cabin, which are glued down. There is only a thin gap around the edges and down the middle between the two panels. Because of the glue I'm going to have to pull up with considerable force, and may delam the plywood a bit where it's glued. Question: Is there a thin tool that can be inserted in the gaps and then turned(?) underneath, so I have a way to pull up on the plywood panels?
    .
    Last edited by BobJ; 04-27-2020 at 12:50 PM.

  8. #298
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    Here's a 45 degree forensic cut. I never paid any attention to cores before. The core material seems to be marine plywood with no voids. The thick cores would add up to 1/2 thickness while the additional cores bring thickness to 3/4 inch. The screw hole is from fastener that held edge trim while epoxy setup.

    As for removal Of existing panels, I would consider making some crude lifting handles and fasten with drywall screws. If a new laminate is used, the holes will be covered and can be epoxy sealed. Russell Brown uses holes and nails frequently to hold plywood sheets when gluing scarf joints with precise alignment.

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  9. #299
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    What, actually IS the stuff you're considering, Bob? Is it a plastic laminate?
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  10. #300
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    Sep 2007
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    It's vinyl. Among the samples I received, I chose the Top Seal version:

    https://ameriteakstore.com/collectio...teak-and-holly

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