Page 29 of 35 FirstFirst ... 19252627282930313233 ... LastLast
Results 281 to 290 of 341

Thread: Surprise!

  1. #281
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,530

    Default

    MTTP explanation that I found helpful.

    https://www.solar-electric.com/learn...trollers.html/
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  2. #282
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    398

    Default

    Landed pricing: Sunpower 110W @ $250, Victron MPPT Bluetooth controller $120, Poly backing $50, Tape $30 = $450 - 7amps. I'd prefer to see an even stronger backing behind that for rigid mounting on a rail, etc.

  3. #283
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,031

    Default

    From Paul Cunningham in the UK:

    Name:  Checking on my Boat.jpg
Views: 239
Size:  74.1 KB

  4. #284
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    23

    Default

    "If you need to get into a car or on public transportation to go for a walk or run, you’re going too far," the San Francisco Department of Public Health says in its order. (Issued today)

  5. #285
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,530

    Default

    San Mateo County instituted a 5-mile limit. We're supposed to only go five miles from home, for recreation. Is checking my boat, "recreation"? Joan is going for a hike this afternoon, at a local park which Google Maps says is 5.7 miles from our house....

    Scofflaw!

    Coyote Point is 11 miles from my house. Grrrr.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  6. #286
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,031

    Default

    It's been almost a month since the last project update (and what a month it has been...) The SHTP is postponed so Surprise!'s solar project is postponed as well. My priorities have shifted to interior cosmetic issues.

    Surprise! was intended to be more of a daysailer and the veneer on her plywood cabin sole is not liking things like wet spinnakers. The sole has been sanded and refinished enough times that some areas don't have much veneer left - especially around the mast. The galley area isn't much better. The PO said they epoxied over some of the veneer to seal it, so I'm not sure whether it can be fully-restored.

    After some research, I ordered samples of a product called Lonwood. It looks good but this possible project has me intimidated. Does anyone have experience with this, or can you recommend someone who does?

    Name:  Cabin Sole.JPG
Views: 162
Size:  116.8 KB Name:  Lonwood.JPG
Views: 162
Size:  126.2 KB

    And does anyone know why you can take two photos in the same orientation and when you post them here, one gets flipped and the other one doesn't (and you can't fix it!) ???
    .
    Last edited by BobJ; 04-24-2020 at 09:44 AM.

  7. #287
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Bodfish, CA
    Posts
    145

    Default

    The teak and holly plywood sole from a boat built in 1979 is still being used and recycled in Bodfish.

    Some construction details of note. The plywood and veneer has some type of waterproof glue that seems to stand the test of time. The key to longevity is the edge sealing. Mine have mahogany trim of about 1/4 to 3/8 inch thickness that is epoxy glued and screwed to the edges to seal the edges from water intrusion.

    The replacement samples could be either wood veneer with detail or plastic laminate like Formica. I have no experience with the specific product.

    Attaching the new finish cover could be epoxy fastened or other adhesive.

    The details that make the job look great are 1) how easy is it to hold new laminate face so it adheres without voids (or bubbles), 2) how do you get sealing side edge and top flush so it looks good?

    A flush top edge requires existing top to be removed or thicker side trim used. The quicker job would probably happen if the sides were replaced and new top finish applied. Then all flooring sections would need to be completed so matching edges are flush.

    My experience with this was recycling teak and holly floor panels from a 34.foot cold molded 3/4 tonner to give larger floorboards in Moore 24 for battery mounting and bilge visuals as well as keeping loose items out of bilge. It was easier to remove edge trim and cut down panels than refacing in the same dimensions.

    Hope this gives a little insight.

    Ants

  8. #288
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Bodfish, CA
    Posts
    145

    Default

    Here's an update.

    I went to the website and read what was available. I still have no idea what material the overlay is made of. The overlay can be fastened with a mfgr adhesive or West epoxy. The application is listed for interior, but a sailboat interior have the same conditions as a ship or house interior. The manufacture lists a molded edge trim that is fastened with an adhesive also.

    I have my biases and have no fondness for a household situation where composite overlays are trying to mimic a true wood installation.

    Sailboats have the visual appeal and retain value from traditional practices.

    My suggestion would be to evaluate using the same teak and holly plywood to replace the ones with degraded faces. Depending on the condition of all the floor boards may not need replacing. This could be a lesser effort than replacing all the floorboards with a different face material.

    After the base effort to replace with like material is complete, then it would time to see if there is any advantage to use the composite overlay. Does it have lesser / greater material and labor result? Would the final result be an asset or liability? As an example, I have seen any number of cases where a deck overlay was added that simply looked like hell.

    I wonder if you would find a boat worker willing to work with the overlay.

    Ants

  9. #289
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,031

    Default

    Thanks Ants. Yes, it's a weighty decision. It's a big project and has the potential to make Surprise!'s cabin sole look like it belongs in a Benehuntalina.

    Here's a photo of Ragtime!'s cabin sole just before I sold her. Same builder, same materials, six years older than Surprise!.

    Name:  21 Cabin Sole.jpg
Views: 112
Size:  1.93 MB

    So I have my standards and without replacing or covering the entire cabin sole, I don't think I can get there.

    Here's a photo from yesterday - the Lonwood piece is up against the bulkhead. Rainwater had been allowed to drip down the mast and onto the wood. The other pieces are a variety of colors, have dents and scrapes and to my eye the whole thing looks like crap. I want to do this once and not have to maintain it. (Philpott is wondering if I'm ever going to sail this boat again!)

    Name:  Sole 2.JPG
Views: 110
Size:  867.1 KB
    Last edited by BobJ; 04-26-2020 at 08:50 AM.

  10. #290
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    Lonwood's technical dept. is being helpful. This is a well-tested product that is used in charter boats and other heavy-use applications and they prefer that it be professionally installed, so I'm making inquiries.
    I understand other peoplesí compulsions. I just donít share these particular compulsions.

    Name:  AFAF5682-9F9B-48B8-BC10-16C3F75A30A2.jpeg
Views: 143
Size:  2.55 MBName:  AE0D08B3-3336-4C21-9EB8-EA448332D5D9.jpeg
Views: 145
Size:  1,001.6 KB

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •