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Thread: Preparations for the LongPac

  1. #81
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    It used to be that the LongPac and TransPac rules allowed you to anchor anywhere, and still continue the race as long as you didn't go ashore. So in theory, you COULD do that.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  2. #82
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    Will it really be only 10-15 TWS at 126 40? One can hope. (GFS per Passage Weather.)

    And a southerly swell under NW wind waves - there must be something happening down south.
    That would be called Hurricane Barbara.

    https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/?epac

    - rob

  3. #83
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    Sep 2008
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    SF Bay
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    From my perspective in the comfort of home... If the goal is to just complete the qualifier, looking at the forecasts, one strategy might be to consider going to Drake’s Bay on Wednesday, anchor for the night then head out in the early AM. The actual sea state offshore will be another deciding factor.

    Be safe.
    Tom

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    319

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    Outsider is going to sit this one out.

  5. #85
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    Sep 2007
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    The weather forecasts make the course look lumpy and fast and not much pleasure sailing. As a qualifier conditions look good to test boats and skippers in solid offshore conditions without being boat-breaking.

    Worst SSS TransPac conditions I have seen were solid 35 knot NW breeze for two days out the Gate, hard reaching in good size lumpy seas with the cockpit shipping a wave about once an hour - I found all the leaks around the companionway in short order. Twice a cresting wave struck the transom and spun Big Beetle through head-to-wind, which is an interesting feeling while hiding down below and the entire boat slowls down, leans the wrong way as the jib backs, the autopilot lets the boat spin entirely around in a slow circle, the jib shakes the rig like crazy, and suddenly it fills and we're off again headed towards Hawaii. The second time it happened I didn't even bother to go up into the cockpit it was so soppy wet. Mike Jefferson came up with his cry of 'Up Periscope' when he would pop open the companionway hatch to poke his head out to see if there was anything out there, and then he would promptly 'Down Periscope' and slam the hatch shut as a wave crest shot over the boat. It was a miserable two days - but fast.

    - rob

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Montara, CA
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    Those conditions don't look too bad from where I'm sitting. We had consistent 28-32 knots for 36 hours or so of the 2017 LongPac. It seems like good ole NorCal boat testing conditions. As to VHF, when a few of us were at the turnaround point, we were making small talk on Ch. 16 when CG (LA/Long Beach, I think) interrupted us and said to move our chit chat somewhere else. Ooops. They hear everything!
    Last edited by Gamayun; 07-02-2019 at 08:24 PM.

  7. #87
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gamayun View Post
    As to VHF, when a few of us were at the turnaround point, we were making small talk on Ch. 16 when CG (LA/Long Beach, I think) interrupted us and said to move our chit chat somewhere else. Ooops. They hear everything!
    If you're off San Francisco and hearing (or being heard by) USCG Long Beach then you're experiencing an interesting tropospheric ducting phenomena for VHF frequencies. On occasion you can communicate from SF to Hawaii that way.

    - rob

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    On Windy.com there are three types of forecasting. It has been suggested that NAM, ECMWF and GFS are sometimes more accurate according to the area. Which of these three seems best for LongPac territory? Or is that oversimplification?
    Here's a link to a short description of the major models:

    https://windy.app/blog/what-is-a-wea...the-world.html
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  9. #89
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    Sep 2007
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    Default Where are you sitting ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gamayun View Post
    Those conditions don't look too bad from where I'm sitting. We had consistent 28-32 knots for 36 hours or so of the 2017 LongPac. It seems like good ole NorCal boat testing conditions. As to VHF, when a few of us were at the turnaround point, we were making small talk on Ch. 16 when CG (LA/Long Beach, I think) interrupted us and said to move our chit chat somewhere else. Ooops. They hear everything!

    Bouy s and models are showing conditions that have, and will again see winds above 40 for the early boats. A Monday return could be pleasent.

  10. #90
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    Jan 2013
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    Montara, CA
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    That's big! I didn't see those projections until after the race had started. Huge respect to all the racers who went forth this year knowing those conditions ahead of them as well as those who decided to call it early or not go at all. Those are some of the hardest decisions to make.

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