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Thread: Who has a "little" boat?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Bodfish, CA
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    80

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    Quote Originally Posted by pogen View Post
    I was visiting Idaho a few weeks ago and every fourth car seemed to be towing a drift boat. Really made me want one.
    The drift boats are like the pickup trucks of river travel, easily holding 1,000 to 1,500 pounds of cargo. The experienced river folk take pride in how few oar strokes they use in a river run. However, shift of weight without rowing and edging a hard chine to nudge the boat are all parts of the game. For lighter sailboats, the concepts are not much different.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Bodfish, CA
    Posts
    80

    Default Little sailors too

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    A couple of sabot dinghies fit right into the mix. One was a standard daggerboard sabot. The second was found on the beach at the headlands of Dana Point and named Lost and Found. Lost and Found was reworked with a t-seat and larger deck. I forgot my tape measure and lost several inches at the gunwale beam and added some to the length. Lost and Found was towed to La Paz as part of the 1998 Baja Ha Ha group.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Santa Rosa
    Posts
    529

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    Ants drift dory takes me back quite a few decades to my childhood in Springfield, Oregon - the McKenzie River runs just north and the McKenzie Pass which the river runs down is to the east. My great uncle had a Woodie Hindman Mckenzie Dory and fly fished the river. As a young boy I sometimes went along as "super cargo" - sitting midships while Uncle Howard and his fishing buddy took turns fishing and rowing - using split bamboo rods and home-tied flies. It was exciting and my introduction to being on the water. I held the woven creel.
    The McKenzie River Dory Ants has is a flat bow model - with a wider bow than my uncle's boat. The boat in the picture below is more traditional with a narrower bow (notice the anchor on the bow). Yes, my uncle kept his boat in "yacht" condition, varnishing and painting during the long Oregon winter. he didn't have the fancy caned "dude" throne, though.
    The original McKenzie River Dories were double ended variations the surf dories used along the Oregon Coast and beach launched. They were shorter, about 14 feet or so. In the mid 1940s, when " fishing dudes" (the term was derisive) had money to pay for a guide to take them fishing the wider bow allowed a comfortable seat and stability to stand.
    The McKenzie Dory (as opposed to the flat bottom Rogue River Dory) has a continuous rocker, so it can spin on a dime. The guide/rower keeps the pointy stern upstream, rowing against the current to slow the bow to allow for the dude to cast into pools alongside the main flow. It's a one-way trip with the relentless current carrying the boat downstream. Going through the rapids, the guide spins the boat so the pointy stern points downstream; at the rapid's bottom he spins the boat, begins to row back upstream while the dude casts into the pool below the rapids.
    Great memories.


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  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    60

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    Wow! A lot of beautiful boats!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    60

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    I found this Penobscot 14 in a neighbor's garage. The neighbor's godfather gave it to him. He can't find the title for either the boat or the trailer but is talking to the family - if he can find the paperwork I'll probably buy it. I've been jonesin' to get a little boat for a long time.

    There's also an OK Dinghy up in Petaluma that is only $350. I'm tempted to go have a look if this P14 doesn't pan out.

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    That Penobscot is one beautiful boat!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    37

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    Trinket, a 6'-6" canvas covered dingy, purchased by my younger more impetuous self (age 20 ish) from a summer camp that I had worked at in the Berkshire hills in western Mass. I stored in my parents cellar, years pass, I move to California, the inquiries about when am a going to get my boat out of the cellar cease after 20 years, it has become an accepted fixture in the house. Two years ago my mom passes, the house must be emptied. I inquire about the cost of shipping it to the west coast, ($2K+), I resolve to donate it to a worthy marine trade school.
    A month later, I look out on my driveway one morning, there it is. No explanation. No note. I suspect my middle brother. We have a family history of surprising each other, showing up un-anounced on birthdays etc.
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    Gauntlet thrown down. I have been nibbling around the edge of accepting the challenge. It was made by the Penn-Yan Boat Co. of Penn Yan NY, it was originally canvas covered, but the abuse it was receiving at the YMCA camp had stripped this away. Without the canvas it leaked copiously, but I remembered enjoying rowing it. Each oar stroke seemed to be able to get her up on a plane, for about 1.5 boat lengths before she settled back in the water.
    Now that I've copped to own this "trinket", I sure the SSS community will inquire, frequently, if I've made any progress in the restoration....? Probably the fire beneath my derriere needed to get me started.
    Chris & FUGU

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,163

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    Quote Originally Posted by FUGU-W30 View Post
    Trinket, a 6'-6" canvas covered dingy ... if I've made any progress in the restoration....? Chris & FUGU
    Hey, Chris! When are you going to take me for a ride on Trinket?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    37

    Default Trinket (will eventualy) rides again

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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    2,163

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    Awwww. Can I sit in front?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    2,817

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    I spy a couple cracked ribs under the center thwart (starboard side) but that's to be expected, and is probably the cause of the large crack at the turn of the bilge. I'd get a forward thwart back in it, to avoid cracking any more as you move it around. Then maybe take it to Gordie Nash for his opinion. He has a shop at Rutherford's in Richmond (near Marina Bay).

    My neighbor (with the Penobscot 14) is off getting married so I haven't heard from him. Before long he'll be hearing "Dear, what are you going to do with that boat?" and we can move forward.

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