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Thread: Low-tech E-rudder build

  1. #31
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    35 minutes with a hand saw, rasp attachment on my drill, and the rotary tool, and the inserts fit as planned.

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    I picked up a nice straight 3/4 inch hardwood dowel and some JB Weld at the hardware store today. I'll "weld" the inserts into the gudgeon wood tonight, and use the dowel....which fits inside the inserts, to keep them lined up just right.. JB Weld is an epoxy product which is preposterously expensive, per volume. It's an epoxy paste mix reinforced with steel. They claim a 5,000 lb fully set strength, and it bonds to both wood and metal. Considering as I used a patch 2 inches x 2 inches to affix a steel loop/patch to a 300 pound stone for the Highland Games a few years ago, and a whole lot of brutishly strong guys have carried that stone hither thither and yon without the JB Weld failing, I think it's pretty strong.

    One layer of fiberglass tape will go over the s.s. inserts, and then a 4, 5, 6 of layers of unidirectional carbon straps will go on top of that. A couple of the straps will go around the whole cassette. Since I'm out of epoxy and don't really have time to get to TAP plastics before Saturday, This is what y'all will see on Saturday at the seminar.
    Last edited by AlanH; 01-09-2020 at 12:12 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  2. #32
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    This morning the s.s. inserts were bedded in a goodly supply of JB Weld steel-reinforced epoxy, with 3/4 inch dowel running between the two inserts to keep them lined up. That will kick off by tonight and should be solid by tomorrow morning. JB Weld is so preposterously strong that I could probably sail with it, like that, but ah...no.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  3. #33
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    After the emergency steering get-together today I'm feeling a little bit of angst about the weight of my cassette. It's strong as $%^&* but heavy!
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  4. #34
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    After picking up Taz! 's e-rudder and blade, I'm seriously considering building a wrapped 'glass and carbon cassette for this rudder. I'll finish what I've got here 'cause it's almost done and it will surely work really well. It's actually not as heavy as I thought it was. I just weighed it on my digital bathroom scale and that says 13.1 pounds. Hmmmmmm. I bet I can cut at least 6-8 of those out, with minimal loss of strength. I'm happy with the blade, though. It's 22 pounds. This will probably be sometime in the future as I need to finish this up and move on to other things. I'll be going to Hawaii in 2024, not 2022 so I have plenty of time. Anyway, the point of this thread was to show people who don't have a ton of $$ but have access to basic tools, that they can build a strong, serviceable E-rudder for up to a 25 -30 foot boat.

    The Wildcat is 26 feet and 4200 pounds. I'm pretty sure that this rudder would steer an Olson 30 or a Wilderness 30...Hawkfarm, Express 27, Olson 25 and so on. The same basic technology can be increased in size by 15-20% to steer an Olson 911-S, Catalina 30, Yankee 30...things like that. That's proven with the earlier rudder I built with essentially the same technology, that steers Skye, which is a Capo 30 and will be their emergency rudder setup for the next Pac Cup. Going up from there, I don't know....out of my area of expertise!

    If you vacuum-bag and use a lot of carbon, you can save a lot of weight.....but at a lot of expense.
    Last edited by AlanH; 01-12-2020 at 02:18 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  5. #35
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    Not much has happened since the get-together on the 11th, but today I wrapped the gudgeons with fiberglass tape and linear carbon fiber. You can't put carbon fiber straight on stainless steel, you get corrosion thattaway. Well, the metal inserts are epoxied into the wood cutouts with JB Weld, which is sillystrong. I mixed up some epoxy and wood dust and made some spooge to goosh in around the edges of the metal/wood interface to make things smoother. Then I laid on two layers of 1.5 inch wide fiberglass tape in epoxy. The fiberglass tape isolates the s.s. from the carbon fiber. That got covered by 6 layers of linear carbon fiber, cut into 1.5 inch -wide tapes.... two of which were long enough to wrap the whole box. Here is is, clamped down to ensure good contact and kicking off with wax paper used as a release layer.

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    Close-up. I clamped, squeezed, pushed...clamped and walked away...came back to squeeze some more. There's good bonding between the carbon layers, and the fiberglass that wraps the cassette.

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    When the epoxy kicks off, this will be preposterously strong. I'll un-clamp and pull off the wax paper in the morning.
    Last edited by AlanH; 01-27-2020 at 09:00 AM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  6. #36
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    OK, it's un-clamped and un-wax-papered. bonding over the top of the steel insert is solid. It will need some trimming and grinding with a little wheel on the rotary too. some of the strapping on the lower gudgeon, down on the box is not well bonded to the cassette. I think I will cut a couple of 1-inch wide straps, maybe about 18 inches long and apply them to the lower gudgeon. This time I'll clamp w piece of plywood over the strap to keep even pressure over the whole thing. Not that it's not strong...it is, but what the heck.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  7. #37
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    Today, two more layers of carbon fiber went on the lower gudgeon and wrapped around the back. They're clamped onto the cassette to ensure good bonding.

    The last bits of "thickening" biaxial glass went on the upper part of the blade. After that kicks off and there's a little bit of sanding, it's all more-or-less ready for paint. The end is in sight.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  8. #38
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    Since mobility is important for us, I've sometimes looked at kayaking lifejackets...

    https://www.seakayakermag.com/best-kayak-life-jackets/
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

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