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Thread: Kynntana Does Pacific Cup 2022

  1. #11
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    Jan 2013
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    So after 3 solid weekends of reaming through-holes in my cored deck, filling with epoxy, cleaning up the cabin from dripping epoxy from the holes that I'd missed taping, refilling holes with epoxy (and ever more glorious sanding), then fairing (and more $@#% glorious sanding) and more fairing (and....well, you get the picture), I am now finally taping
    tonight and going to prime the decks tomorrow. This is freaking complicated! Am I over-thinking it? The whole reason for this massively time consuming endeavor was so I had a new base for the new dodger. In the meantime, it has taken so long to get to this point, I'm a little concerned that the dodger-making people went out of business along with my deposit. It'll all work out. I am really excited to start practicing spinnaker runs (on light wind days). Jackie's picture of K's spinner (one of the few things I kept from the PO though I gave it away at least once) is really beautiful and inspiring.

    Anyway, wish me luck that the painting is not as complicated as I'm making it....
    Last edited by Gamayun; 05-06-2021 at 06:51 PM.

  2. #12
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    Another reason is the non-skid as Jackie mentioned. I've learned so much about how boats are formed with certain non-skid patterns while in their mold. K's is one of the most common ones though I can't remember the name of it. Now, I'm going to try SoftSand (plastic) with the coarse material on the decks and the soft tread on the benches in the cockpit to save our buns. The current non-skid is slicker'n glass so it should all be a huge improvement and especially good for crew safety!

  3. #13
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    Jan 2015
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    43

    Default It's worth it!

    It is complicated, something new always requires more thinking than something familiar. Two cool parts, one you learn a new skill and second it will look fabulous!!!Name:  IMG_8415.JPG
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  4. #14
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    Sep 2007
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    Chris, you sure did a great job. I see it close up and it looks just as good.

  5. #15
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    OMG, that's amazing! I'd heard you changed Fugu's color, which I had always liked but that green is gorgeous. What paint did you use? Did you spray or roll/tip?

  6. #16
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    The first coat of primer went on and I was not a happy camper. It looked horrible. Then the second coat went on, and I could finally start to relax that maybe this won't look like hell after all. I need to do more sanding (quelle surprise) but should have the topcoat paint on the deck by Sunday. I hope to maybe start the the non-skid taping by Monday. I think I need to give it 24 hours to dry before taping. Some other lessons learned:

    1) No matter how great the company and how fabulous the food, never ever have your friend and her black- haired dog over just before the big paint job.

    2) Learn how to spray paint.

    3) The Gill knee pads are great for sailing, but not so good for kneeling for 4 hours straight.

    4) If the chandlery is out of the short handled rollers, go somewhere else to find them because the long-handled ones are going to get tiring soon.

    5) Make sure to have pen in hand when talking to the paint rep after he rapid-fire rattles off "just do X,Y, Z then L,M,N,O,P followed by A,B,C and of course D." Uh yeah, that's what I was I planning.

    6) If you're going to tent the boat with tarps, figure out a way to allow standing room.

    8) If the technical data sheet says to abrade with 100-120 grit, then use 100-120 grit because 80 grit is really too aggressive.

    9) Use metric because calculating12% of 1 quart is just stupid math.

    10) There's no recovery after resting a gloved hand on wet primer except for more glorious sanding.

    11) The workers in the boatyard don't get paid enough to do this work.

    Name:  PXL_20210507_233101193.jpg
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  7. #17
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    Sep 2007
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    That's amazing! You're getting right along with your project too, except you're doing it yourself.

    And you still have enough creative juice left to write the 11 pointers above, which are hilarious.

    Impressed.

  8. #18
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    Jan 2015
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    Looking good! And making great progress! Sanding and painting makes me grateful I have a desk job!!
    FUGU is painted with Sea Foam Green from Alexseal a two-part paint. Rolled on and tipped with a roller as well, painting was definitely a two person job. This kind of paint needs to go on thin, so the main painter is very busy spreading the paint before it gets tacky (and then drys lumpy if you keep messing with it after it becomes tacky). My daughter tipped, and followed me closely. Got her up before dawn to paint before the wind came up on the day of the third coat, she was a trooper! And she smiles every time FUGU gets a complement cause she knows she played a key part!
    I found:
    1. The wind is my enemy when painting, it pays to wait for 5 knots or less.
    2. Sanding is the cure for painting mistakes. FUGU's first coat went on ok, the wind started evaporating the solvent too fast towards the end. The second coat went on terribly, my impatience got the better of me and I painted in too much wind, very lumpy. Lots of sanding fixed it though! Sanding can't fix the final coat however...
    3. As I sanded I found that my eyes were not the best evaluator of surface smoothness, I learned to trust my finger tips. If my fingers could feel lumps, the paint would not cover the imperfection but would highlight it.

  9. #19
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    Chris, this is EXACTLY the same process on Kynntana and using the same product. How much did you thin the topcoat? I've been using 12% on the primer, which has been working great but thinking I might go up to 20-25% with the topcoat. Your daughter should be very proud. Fugo turned out better than beautiful. This is one of the hardest DIY projects I've ever done. Michael Jefferson once told me that the sense of touch can discriminate at several thousandths of an inch. I just looked it up and one study found "the human finger can discriminate between surfaces patterned with ridges as small as 13 nanometres in amplitude and non-patterned surfaces." I do all the sanding by feel. The wind was my enemy today blowing at more than 15 knots. I'm going to make myself get up early tomorrow (Sunday) so I can get the first topcoat down before the wind pipes up.
    Last edited by Gamayun; 05-08-2021 at 08:18 PM.

  10. #20
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    Jan 2013
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    The reducer is 16-33% and then there's an accelerator that helps pop the bubbles so (theoretically) I shouldn't have to tip after rolling. Will wait to do that tomorrow. Today, I'm focusing on fixing some pinholes in the deck that's came through the primer. I've read that might have to do with a bubble or some adhesion issue. The AlexSeal application guide is 146 pages long. I seem to read it about 5 times a day. The technical data sheets don't have this level of detail. Basically the TDSs just have the mixing formula and the recoat times.
    Last edited by Gamayun; 05-09-2021 at 10:53 AM.

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