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Thread: AIS and Knot Meter Requirement

  1. #1
    Darren is offline Enough to be safely dange
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    Default AIS and Knot Meter Requirement

    I was just looking threw the safety requirements and came across section 3.7 AIS. All boats shall have an AIS Transponder. Maybe I'm miss understanding or they are using the term wrong but I though transponders were only for larger boats, and were rather expensive. Did they mean receiver so you can see incoming traffic or did they really mean transponder so other can see you. The effective date is 2024 so maybe some newer devices will be on the market by then.

    Also does GPS count as a knot meter?

  2. #2
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    I checked the latest SER for the SHTP 2023: https://www.jibeset.net/racedoc/JACK...pdf?1651463772
    You need a receiver, 3.9.
    3.17 isn't specific about what a knotmeter is. Arguably any device with a GPS that shows boat speed could qualify. Although I suspect that the intention is speed through water. Good question!

  3. #3
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    a knot meter is a knot meter, eg a instrument for measuring speed through the water.
    It is there as a requirement so that (amongst other things) the skipper has 1/2 of the means to maintain a dead reckoning track/position.
    No, GPS doesn't meet the requirement.
    But if you're Skip apparently an orange and a stop watch will do.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    a knot meter is a knot meter, eg a instrument for measuring speed through the water.
    It is there as a requirement so that (amongst other things) the skipper has 1/2 of the means to maintain a dead reckoning track/position.
    No, GPS doesn't meet the requirement.
    But if you're Skip apparently an orange and a stop watch will do.
    I agree with the above. This has been covered before on my thread. What I say is unofficial, my opinion only, and at times unreliable. When I raced WILDFLOWER in a Pac Cup, head inspector Chuck Hawley came aboard at Santa Cruz Harbor with his inspection list. When he got to the knot meter requirement, I explained I built WF purposely with no thru-hull fittings and was not about to drill a hole in the hull for a 50 cent plastic paddle wheel. Chuck said, "yes, I agree, what is your point?"

    I pulled out my knot meter, which was a large Navel orange written on it with black felt tip the the speed formula for measuring the time an orange peel passes bow to stern. Chuck agreed, and said he'd learned that formula as a kid also. I passed the knot meter requirement and we shared the orange.

    This does not mean an SSS inspector will agree in 2023. But that was my experience and precedent at that time, 20 years ago.
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-02-2022 at 05:57 AM.

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    So you know, in the 1978 SHTP on WILDFLOWER I had no electronics or instruments but a compass and Walker log. I kept a log book updated every 4 hours with estimated course and speed, as well as celestial fixes and noon positions. After the finish at Hanalei I went back and plotted my Dead Reckoning positions only, not the celestial fixes...By the time I reached the finish, my DR position was 14 miles off. It can be done.

    Still unsure of my navigation accuracy, I carried a small AM battery radio. When ~ 300 miles out, I began receiving Hawaiian stations. By rotating the radio (antenna) I assured myself Kauai was dead ahead. Hono off the port bow, and Hilo on the port side.
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-02-2022 at 06:12 AM.

  6. #6
    Darren is offline Enough to be safely dange
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    My boat doesn't have a hole for a paddle wheel. I'd rather not drill a hole for a transducer to check a box. I guess I could have a transducer on a stick. I don't understand why GPS wouldn't count. I understand the point is for dead reckoning navigation but if you have power why not know exactly where you are with GPS. If you don't have power then yeah fruit away.

  7. #7
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    I don't understand why GPS wouldn't count.
    Well they do count toward the GPS requirement but the GPS can be turned off at the tap or that equipment can fail.

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    Redundancy is good. Oranges are tasty. If you have a handheld Garmin with plenty of batteries, an inexpensive tablet with a chart plotter installed, and a Standard Horizon radio with AIS and GPS, that all counts toward the requirement, right? No need for a hole in the hull.

  9. #9
    Darren is offline Enough to be safely dange
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    That's my thought just wasn't sure if that's except able

  10. #10
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    Wouldn't you know ... Knotmeter doesn't appear in the online Merriam-Webster dictionary.

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