Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Singlehanded "Anything Goes" North Bay Sailing Instructions Posted

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2022
    Posts
    103

    Default Singlehanded "Anything Goes" North Bay Sailing Instructions Posted

    Hello, SSS Racers!

    Sailing instructions for the Singlehanded "Anything Goes" North Bay race are now available on jibeset.

    A few things are worth noting as you READ THE SAILING INSTRUCTIONS:

    1) We have just one radio channel this time.
    2) Because we have one radio channel, we'll need everyone to check in five minutes before we begin the first (radio-only) starting sequence.
    3) I'm deferring class assignments until Thursday night so that I can better handle registrations between now and the deadline.
    4) I've included a chartlet, since this is a welcoming, fun race.
    5) The course avoids the Sisters and the Point Pinole Light marker since both are near some shallows that might be unsuitable for new singlehanded racers.
    6) I've picked some less-commonly-used buoys to get a length close to 19 NM, since some people care about that.
    7) I've arranged for the course to end at the Richmond Race Deck (basically RYC harbor) so you can easily come to Richmond YC after the race to socialize with your fellow SSS racers and talk about where you went after the race.
    8) There's some "social" material after the SIs proper.

    Thank you for racing with the SSS!

    Richard, 2023 Race Co-Chair

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    221

    Default

    The marks SPCL-E and SPCL-5 cross the San Pablo Channel which is a restricted area.Name:  Chart - San Pablo Bay Mercator 18654_1 1-40,000  Soundings- Feet.jpg
Views: 5124
Size:  26.7 KB

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,437

    Default

    Confused by the sailing instructions? Well, this is your chance to really get into the arcane rules of racing according to the several different legends represented in the instructions: YRA, Light list #, your chart, my chart (e.g. PSB# 2) and (my favorite) just plain English.

    The Singlehanded Sailing Society has most usually referred sailors to marks with names. Singlehanders are busy trimming sails and trying not to fall off our boats. We also have no crew to read aloud to us ("Not that island! The other island!") For instance, Red Rock, Harding Rock, Alcatraz. Blossom Rock. With these race instructions we have the opportunity to learn about the Coast Guard Light List, Volume 6. Is it full of esoteria? Yes, yes it is. And once you buy into it, you go down the Rabbit Hole.

    file:///C:/Users/Philpott/Desktop/Sailing/Safety%20Issues/LightList%20V6.pdf

    Find here the four pages of the only part of the San Francisco and San Pablo Bays that you need care about on Saturday.

    San Pablo Bay and vicinities.pdf

    And remember, your chart plotter has several different settings for the coordinates. Make sure yours is synced to the same as are posted here. [Hint: The Light list locations are synced to Degrees and Minutes. You didn't know that your chart plotter had different settings? Well, lucky you to have read the SSS Forum today. Better now than offshore. Don't ask how someone would know that].

    Better still, instead of all this bother, just stay behind Dura Mater. WAY behind Dura Mater. Stay back until you finish to starboard of "Killer Green" aka RCH-7. If you come into the RYC clubhouse anyone will be able to tell you how it got its name.
    Last edited by Philpott; 04-20-2023 at 05:20 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    Better still, instead of all this bother, just stay behind Dura Mater. WAY behind Dura Mater. Stay back until you finish to starboard of "Killer Green" aka RCH-7.
    Is this a test to see if we're paying attention?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,437

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    Is this a test to see if we're paying attention?
    To the SSS? Yeah, maybe.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,661

    Default

    I loaded Surprise! with gear yesterday because I'm going croozing for Butter & Eggs this weekend. Sorry to miss "Anything Goes."

    These are neither butter nor eggs:

    Name:  Earrings.jpg
Views: 5041
Size:  743.6 KB

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2022
    Posts
    103

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Gutoff View Post
    The marks SPCL-E and SPCL-5 cross the San Pablo Channel which is a restricted area.Name:  Chart - San Pablo Bay Mercator 18654_1 1-40,000  Soundings- Feet.jpg
Views: 5124
Size:  26.7 KB
    To elaborate on last night's answer at the competitor's meeting where I'd said that SPCL-E and SPCL-5 were not restricted areas:

    They are. And they're not.

    In general, I'm a big fan of quoting rule numbers and showing my work so someone can tell me I've messed this up and point to my error. So, here's my reasoning.

    The area in question is covered by 33 CFR 165.1181, which you can look up at https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/33/165.1181 . Or if you prefer the official GPO PDF version, https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/...ec165-1181.pdf The Cornell one is easier on the eyes.

    Both copies list eight (8) "regulated naviation areas" in part c.ii, some of which have multiple separate polygons. For San Pablo Bay, the two areas to look at are c.ii.3 and c.ii.4:

    (3) San Pablo Strait Channel RNA. The following is a regulated navigation area - The waters bounded by a line connecting the following coordinates, beginning at:

    3756′06″ N, 12226′49″ W; thence to 3757′26″ N, 12227′21″ W; thence to 3800′48″ N, 12224′45″ W; thence to 3801′54″ N, 12222′24″ W; thence to 3801′44″ N, 12222′18″ W; thence to 3757′37″ N, 12226′23″ W; thence to 3756′06″ N, 12226′34″ W; thence returning to the point of beginning.

    And

    (4) Pinole Shoal Channel RNA. The following is a regulated navigation area - The waters bounded by a line connecting the following coordinates, beginning at:

    3801′54″ N, 12222′25″ W; thence to 3803′13″ N, 12219′50″ W; thence to 3803′23″ N, 12218′31″ W; thence to 3803′13″ N, 12218′29″ W; thence to 3803′05″ N, 12219′28″ W; thence to 3801′44″ N, 12222′18″ W; thence returning to the point of beginning.


    If you are the kind of person who does better with a chartlet than a list of coordinates, and are willing to spend the time to map them, you'll have a picture like this, with the San Pablo Straight Channel in gold and the Pinole Shoal channel in gray. (Note I did not bother converting the points from NAD83 to WGS84, which is probably why they don't line up perfectly with the light list buoy locations.)

    Name:  SanPabloBayRegulatedNavigationAreas33CFR165.1181.png
Views: 5098
Size:  536.8 KB

    So yes, it is one of the "regulated naviation areas" in the Bay.

    However, what matters is not just the area that is regulated, but what the regulations forbid.

    For example, the Pinole Shoal Channel (in gray) has this in section (e).2, which is why the course does NOT go around SPCL 7 & 8.

    (2) Pinole Shoal Channel RNA: (i) A vessel less than 1600 gross tons or a tug with a tow of less than 1600 gross tons is not permitted within this RNA.

    (ii) A power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons shall not enter Pinole Shoal Channel RNA when another power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons or tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons is navigating therein if such entry would result in meeting, crossing, or overtaking the other vessel, when either vessel is:

    (A) Carrying certain dangerous cargoes (as denoted in 160.203 of this subchapter);

    (B) Carrying bulk petroleum products; or

    (C) A tank vessel in ballast.

    (iii) Vessels permitted to use this channel shall proceed at a reasonable speed so as not to endanger other vessels or interfere with any work which may become necessary in maintaining, surveying, or buoying the channel, and they shall not anchor in the channel except in case of a deviation authorized under paragraph (b) of this section.

    (iv) This paragraph shall not be construed as prohibiting any necessary use of the channel by any public vessels while engaged in official duties, or in emergencies by pilot boats.

    But there's no mention of the San Pablo Straight channel in the regulations after defining it.

    Which means the only rules we need to look at are section (d), General Regulations:

    (d) General regulations.

    (1) A power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, navigating within the RNAs defined in paragraph (c) of this section, shall not exceed a speed of 15 knots through the water.

    (2) A power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, navigating within the RNAs defined in paragraph (c) of this section, shall have its engine(s) ready for immediate maneuver and shall operate its engine(s) in a control mode and on fuel that will allow for an immediate response to any engine order, ahead or astern, including stopping its engine(s) for an extended period of time.

    (3) The master, pilot or person directing the movement of a vessel within the RNAs defined in paragraph (c) of this regulation shall comply with Rule 9 of the Inland Navigation Rules (INRs) (33 CFR subchapter E) in conjunction with the provisions of the associated INRs.


    So, unless you are the master of a power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow... this is not really a restricted area.

    I hope that helps!

    As always, if you think I've got this wrong, say so.

    Richard, 2023 SSS Race Co-Chair
    Last edited by fauxboat; 04-20-2023 at 06:17 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2022
    Posts
    103

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    Confused by the sailing instructions? Well, this is your chance to really get into the arcane rules of racing according to the several different legends represented in the instructions: YRA, Light list #, your chart, my chart (e.g. PSB# 2) and (my favorite) just plain English.

    The Singlehanded Sailing Society has most usually referred sailors to marks with names. Singlehanders are busy trimming sails and trying not to fall off our boats. We also have no crew to read aloud to us ("Not that island! The other island!") For instance, Red Rock, Harding Rock, Alcatraz. Blossom Rock. With these race instructions we have the opportunity to learn about the Coast Guard Light List, Volume 6. Is it full of esoteria? Yes, yes it is. And once you buy into it, you go down the Rabbit Hole.

    file:///C:/Users/Philpott/Desktop/Sailing/Safety%20Issues/LightList%20V6.pdf

    Find here the four pages of the only part of the San Francisco and San Pablo Bays that you need care about on Saturday.

    San Pablo Bay and vicinities.pdf

    And remember, your chart plotter has several different settings for the coordinates. Make sure yours is synced to the same as are posted here. [Hint: The Light list locations are synced to Degrees and Minutes. You didn't know that your chart plotter had different settings? Well, lucky you to have read the SSS Forum today. Better now than offshore. Don't ask how someone would know that].

    Better still, instead of all this bother, just stay behind Dura Mater. WAY behind Dura Mater. Stay back until you finish to starboard of "Killer Green" aka RCH-7. If you come into the RYC clubhouse anyone will be able to tell you how it got its name.

    Thanks for this --- I'd made a slide with all the Light List Coordinates for the competitor's meeting, and then decided to drop it when a) I did not have time to re-sort it in race-rounding order; b) I did not have good coordinates for the Bob Klein buoy.

    But in light of this post, I think that was a mistake.

    So on jibeset now you'll see the slide I (in hindsight) should have shared. It is still not sorted, and it still does not list the RYC Bob Klein buoy. But it may be helpful. Look for "Light List Slide" at the bottom of the notice area on https://jibeset.net/JACKY000.php?RG=T00937578 .


    Richard, 2023 SSS Race Co-Chair.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,437

    Default

    And remember: Slow down. Stay behind this boat

    Name:  IMG_4323.jpeg
Views: 5001
Size:  75.0 KB

    This just in from one of my editors:

    "Better to say “keeping ‘Killer Green’ to starboard” as this is the more common verbiage."
    Last edited by Philpott; 04-20-2023 at 06:28 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    221

    Default

    Thanks Richard. I guess the NOAA charts are not as accurate as yours. Is that Navionics you are using?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •