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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3381
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Santa Rosa
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    553

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    I don't know if you've included "NANCY" on raw 2010 PacCup, but here goes:
    1. Loss of compass light (it was a TackTick digital solar compass). What we discovered was the light was set for Pst and not other time zones, so it went off while it was still dark - really dark. Borrowed compass/no instructions. Pointing a light directly at it flooded out the digits, The compass was mounted on the main hatch slide, so one of us sat next to the bulkhead and shined a small light into the side of the compass face, sort of illuminating the thing. Night after night. Battery after battery. Sore arm after sore arm. And angry complaint after angry complaint from the guy on the tiller if we were jolted by a wave and it got into his eyes.
    2. Running into trash - fishing lines/nets several times - always at 0200. Pushing the trash off the rudder and backing the boat down under sail to clear the keel. Once the boat stopped to abruptly we thought we'd hit something hard and spent the first few minutes checking fork damage/leaks, It took half an hour, and in a race we eked out a 15 minute victory possibly could have cost us 1st Place in our division.

  2. #3382
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gamayun View Post
    "Failure of Compass Light = 20%." Is this because of hand steering at night? Dang. I would have thought a jury-rigged small flashlight in the right spot would be the answer to that.
    Compass lights, a most vital piece of equipment for night sailing, alway seem to fail just when really needed. You can count on it. This is usually because of their fragile nature, tiny wires, and susceptibility to corrosion in their moist environment. A spare LED can be rigged, but best to have one ready to go so there is no delay trying to find parts. If needed, red fingernail polish can adopt the bulb for night time sailing. A red headlamp can be employed on a temporary basis. As HS points out, any ferrous metal, especially a flashlite, near the compass can induce substantial error.

    Wow, I've never heard of a compass light that was time zone dependent.

    https://www.defender.com/product.jsp?id=3457889
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-30-2019 at 09:07 AM.

  3. #3383
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Live in Phoenix, boat in San Diego
    Posts
    244

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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Compass lights, a most vital piece of equipment for night sailing, always seem to fail just when really needed. You can count on it.
    Yes, Skip, I saw where you said something to that effect in the run-up to the 2018 SHTP, so I investigated what bulb was needed as a spare. Expecting to find a plug-in bulb, I instead found a small circuit board on which two LED bulbs were soldered (along with a few capacitors or resistors), and which itself was soldered to the power leads. Not having equipment to be soldering things at sea, I didn't pursue the idea further. The light failed on the return sail. Fortunately, the wind instrument indicator directly above the compass on the binnacle guard was a good place to mount a headlamp, so the mistake wasn't too big of a problem.

    Then, afterward, I learned that the standard-issue replacement part for my compass consists of the bulbs, the circuit board, and the power leads all together; you just have to pull the compass body from its mount to disconnect the old and connect the new. Sheesh. One of the most moronic of my many rookie mistakes.

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    Last edited by AZ Sailor; 07-30-2019 at 03:59 PM.
    Lee
    s/v Morning Star
    Valiant 32

  4. #3384
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
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    2,052

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    Just saw MAIDEN the film and I can't recommend it enough. An inspirational story, well edited, taking us back 30 years to the 1989 Whitbread Round the World Race. Tracy Edwards and her all women crew are the heroines in the then male dominated sport of ocean racing.

    The restored MAIDEN is currently on a commemorative 2 year world tour to raise funds and awareness for girls' educational organizations. At this date she is in Vancouver, and headed to Seattle August 7th. If you are in Seattle, the film is currently playing at the Regal Meridian 16 - 1501 7th Ave.

    After Seattle, MAIDEN and her all women crew will be heading south to San Francisco Bay and will be berthed at the SFYC in Belvedere at the end of August.

    MAIDEN is an IOR "lead dog" design, typical of the times. Tracy Edwards, after being unable to secure financial backing for her ambitious goal, bought the former DISQUE d'OR with assistance from King Hussein of Jordan. Edwards chose well. MAIDEN's designer was Bruce Farr, one of the best in the business. And her construction of aluminum was nearly bulletproof, leading the mocking press to dub the boat "tarts in a tin."

    Maybe someone on this Forum knows, but MAIDEN's brush with sinking during the Whitbread was not well documented. The floorboards were awash while the crew stopped racing and searched for the source of the leak. They found the leak "in the mast." I'm guessing the mast step at the hull had issues. Surely the mast partner wasn't leaking that much. ??

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    Here's MAIDEN being restored before the Whitbread ...She had already been around the World twice, once singlehanded in the BOC Race. Does anyone remember her skipper and the boat's name in that race? This fellow was awarded his country's highest civilian award for bravery for his rescue of sailor whose boat sank after hitting an iceberg in the Southern Ocean during the 1990–91 BOC Challenge. In 2006 this 3x solo circumanvigator was inducted into the Single-Handed Sailors' Hall of Fame in Newport, R.I.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 07-31-2019 at 03:16 PM.

  5. #3385
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alameda CA
    Posts
    345

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    Bertie Reed -

    The BOC name was Stabilo Boss, which was not his first nor last BOC boat

    DH
    Last edited by DaveH; 07-31-2019 at 11:29 AM.

  6. #3386
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,355

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    Joan and I have a date to go see Maiden this week. I'm stunned...she wants to see a SAILING MOVIE.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  7. #3387
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Saratoga
    Posts
    121

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    Joan and I have a date to go see Maiden this week. I'm stunned...she wants to see a SAILING MOVIE.
    It is quite good. An impressive amount of footage from back in the day, interspersed with present day interviews.

  8. #3388
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    219

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    "Biltong" Berty. Jerky is the north american version of biltong. I leave the rest to your imagination. Berty was famous for his exploits with VOORTREKKER..

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    Bertie Reed -

    The BOC name was Stabilo Boss, which was not his first nor last BOC boat

    DH

  9. #3389
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    75

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    Skip, I totally agree about the movie, Maiden. Patty and I saw it on opening night here in San Diego. The reviews said it might be good but it was even better than I had hoped.

    Bill Meanley
    Doflin

  10. #3390
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    For 85 miles, while ascending this section of rugged northwest trending coast, there is little protection to be found from the prevailing northwesterly winds and summer low clouds and fog that lie just offshore.

    2 miles north of where we camped for 3 nights is a stunningly beautiful point of land and cove with a sandy beach offering a lee of refuge for small craft before beginning their northbound passage.

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    Marking the point, there used to be a red and white bell buoy apparently now discontinued. Not discontinued are the black and white zebra roaming the coastal hills, clearly visible from the beach.

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    Five miles north of the point is a lighthouse with its first order Fresnel lens removed for safe keeping from earthquakes.

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    A pleasant hike follows the cliff around the point with views of elephant seals on inaccessible beaches 80 feet below.

    Anchorage is in 20 feet, sand bottom, with dinghy landing available in the cove and a wine bar a short hike up a sandy hill. At sunset we could hear coyotes, and the crescent sliver of a new moon gave way to dark skies, bright stars, familiar constellations, and the Milky Way.

    I can't recommend this location enough whether traversing these rugged shores by land or sea. Can anyone identify the name and location of this delightful cove of refuge?

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    Last edited by sleddog; 08-05-2019 at 10:35 AM.

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