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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3701
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    May 2015
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    Redwood City
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    That is a funny story! What was said the next day?
    Suggestions for where I could practice anchoring safely?
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  2. #3702
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    Sep 2008
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    Saratoga
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    153

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    Quote Originally Posted by jamottep View Post
    Suggestions for where I could practice anchoring safely?
    The outer harbor where your at, has pretty good holding, and is fairly wide.

  3. #3703
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamottep View Post
    That is a funny story! What was said the next day?
    Overnight, the northerly much diminished. When I rose at 0300 to check around, the sloop that had anchored on WILDFLOWER was peacefully hanging about 40 feet stern. The sun rose over the island, cold temps warmed, and it began to turn into much the pleasant day.

    My new best friends astern smiled and waved as they came on deck. They gently pulled themselves forward to WILDFLOWER, graciously expressed thanks, passed off a tin of Brittany butter cookies, and asked to be set free. I did not catch their names or name of their boat. When last seen, they were running west out the the Bay, pretty as a picture on the shimmering sea.

    I remembered my anchoring difficulties in early days of cruising WILDFLOWER. In those times, WILDFLOWER did not have an engine, rather a 14' lifeboat oar from San Pedro Navy Surplus.

    Pelican Bay is about as pretty a cove as you will find and my first attempt anchoring at Santa Cruz Island. After scouting an opening between two cruising boats, anchored bow and stern in usual Santa Cruz Island fashion, we made our approach drifting downwind with steerage, sails furled.

    My plan was to drop our 12 pound Danforth with 25 feet of chain off the stern, pay out scope until the bow was near the approaching cliff. Snug up short. And lay a similar Danforth off the bow before switching ends and turning WILDFLOWER 180, bow into the afternoon seabreeze.

    Everything was going smoothy until I realized the Danforth off the stern was not setting...it was not dragging, but to the finger touch on the rode, the anchor seemed to be slip sliding along..."Oops," I thought, "this is going to be embarrassing if we run WF's bow into the steep-to cliff...

    Things proceeded in slow motion as I quickly transferred the bow anchor to the stern. Now I had two anchors astern, one from either corner cleat. And both were sliding along on the bottom as WILDFLOWER approached the cliff.

    It seemed quite a few fellow sailors were watching, and several, without hesitation, headed towards WILDFLOWER. The next thing I know, WILDFLOWER was being towed stern first to safety by a small dinghy with a Seagull outboard, one rowboat, and a kid in an inner tube.

    Eventually, with help, WILDFLOWER was properly anchored bow and stern. And I invited my new best friends aboard for a beer. That afternoon I learned two things: my lead-line was not a good fit for single handed anchoring: Pelican Bay was deeper than I anticipated, 45-50 feet. And the bottom was layers of detached kelp on which a Danforth anchor has difficulty penetrating....

    All in a day.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 03-29-2020 at 01:24 PM.

  4. #3704
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    *ATTENTION* We have had an unfortunate medical incident that may be of concern. At ACE hardware we bought two SPRAYMASTER, "The Chemically Resistant Sprayer" "High Output" "5 Year Guarantee" for $9 each. (Gray container, purple squeeze handle.)

    After being assured these "top-of-the-line" sprayers would handle bleach by an ACE Hardware employee, we took them home and filled them with straight, house-hold, bleach. After several weeks of service, they began leaking from indeterminate locations.

    Before we stopped using them, wearing rubber gloves, one of the sprayers blew a mist of beach out the back of the head at a plastic to plastic joint, and into an eyeball. Fortunately the eye was immediately flushed with water and an ophthalmologist summoned to Urgent Care assured there was no long term damage, just redness and scratchiness, which diminished over 3 days. Sight is now normal.

    In reading the fine, white, print on the back of the sprayer, it clearly states "Do not use chlorinated solvents." I have confirmed with customer support at Delta Industries, maker of the sprayer, that "chlorinated solvents" means bleach and should not be used in this sprayer. I do not know if a diluted solution of bleach and water is OK.

    Our bad. Be safe.
    Last edited by sleddog; 03-30-2020 at 11:41 AM.

  5. #3705
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    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    From the CBC archives

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    Many will recognize the famous brigantine VARUA at Friday Harbor. VARUA and her crew were subject of William Albert Robinson's classic book To The Great Southern Sea . VARUA was specially designed and built for weathering the ultimate storm in the Southern Ocean. Her remains molder at Lovric's on the Guemes Channel in Anacortes, WA.

    For home baked banana bread over Marianne's Macapuno icecream, served virtually from the back deck of CBC, who will be first to name the ketch, or the famous book or author she inspired?d Hint: think pirate.
    (Whoops, I see the boat is named in the photo.) OK, who is the one time pirate and where was the boat built? Andersens at Hunter's Point, Stone Boat Works in Alameda, or South Coast in Newport Beach?
    Last edited by sleddog; 04-01-2020 at 10:46 AM.

  6. #3706
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    Dec 2012
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    Alameda CA
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    Jack London's Snark, subject of The Cruise of the Snark was built at Andersens
    Last edited by DaveH; 04-01-2020 at 12:14 PM.

  7. #3707
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    Jack London's Snark, subject of The Cruise of the Snark was built and Andersens
    This is a tough bunch to stump..Hedgehog is correct: SNARK was built at Andersens at Hunter's Point. Jack London and his wife Charmian had to leave SNARK in the Solomon Islands of the South Pacific due to his illness. SNARK's final resting place is unknown.

    Meanwhile, on AIS, an armada of cruisers is heading north up the west coast of Baja. Non-essential travel and Mexican ports are closing and crossing to French Polynesia is closed, as entering almost all inhabited Pacific islands is banned for visitors.

  8. #3708
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    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay
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    243

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    I’ve long been a Jack London fan and reading his TALES OF THE FISH PATROL makes for great stuff while anchored out by China Camp, or for when you've wondered, “Where the heck is Collinsville.” It’s no coincidence that I named DAZZLER after the “title character” in one of his stories.

    Just to be clear... Jack London’s SNARK was built in 1906 at the yard later known as Anderson and Cristofani Shipyard, India Basin, Hunters Point. Not to be confused with (the former) Ron Anderson’s Boat Yard in Sausalito, now the location of KKMI, Sausalito.

    “Anderson and Cristofani was the survivor of a group of shipbuilders who built San Francisco Bay scows between the early 1870s and the mid-1930s in a row of yards along Innes Avenue in the India Basin at Hunter’s Point.

    Henry P. Anderson a shipwright arrived there from Denmark in 1893 and bought Dircks’ yard on Innes Avenue. He was building Jack London’s The Snark in 1906 when the earthquake hit.

    Anderson was joined by Alf Cristofani in 1926 and the name of the shipyard changed. The yard was sold to property speculators in the 1980s but the North part of the yard was acquired by the City in 1989 for the development of the India Basin Shoreline Park.” Jamie Lyons [http://www.jamescharleslyons.com/ind...unters-point/]
    Tom P.

  9. #3709
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    Dec 2012
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    Alameda CA
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    368

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    In an odd coincidence, this past fall, before the world turned inside out, I had a side gig running a small music series for the SF Parks Alliance on Friday evenings at the site of the old Andersen and Christofani works in India Basin.
    As Dazzler notes, the north part of the property was acquired by SF Parks 30 odd years ago, and became India Basin Shoreline Park.
    More recently SF Parks also acquired the property with the old ways and docks, and the SF Parks Alliance is starting the slow process of turning it into a park as well... the music series was designed as a means open the gates & draw the community down to the water front.
    India Basin Shoreline Park is behind the chain link fence in the photos.
    The building to the extreme left of the first photo is the Shipwrights Cottage, which is a landmark structure and also the site of the first union hall for shipwrights in the bay.

    DH

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    Last edited by DaveH; 04-01-2020 at 05:34 PM.

  10. #3710
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    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    Good news from Port Townsend: Dan and Linda Newland are no longer boat less. Having sold PEGGY SUE IV to Steve Lewis, they went in search of something more appropriate to their cruising grounds of the Pacific NW.

    Dan and Linda, ever meticulous, did their homework, and then some. What has now joined their family, including Nubbs the Manx and Tutu the parrot, is TSUIAT, an immaculate Grand Banks 36. Built in 1989 "Susie" checks all the boxes, and cruises at a respectable 8 knots at 1,800 RPM with a Ford Lehman 135.

    Alaska is on their radar. But for the moment, borders are closed. Dan, ever the boat builder, is fine tuning equipment and gear, and both are practicing boat handling, choosing to forgo the bow thruster whenever possible.

    Friends from SF Bay, and their longtime association with SSS, wish Dan and Linda the very best with their warm and cozy little ship.

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