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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3691
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    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    Our friends in Hanalei are used to flooding ....at least 6 major floods in the last 14 years. The mouth of the Hanalei River, at the end of Weke Rd., is shoal. And when it rains and rains on the slopes of Mt. Waialeale, reportedly one of the wettest places in the world, much of runoff fills the Hanalei River which backs up on the entrance shoal and overflows into town..

    It happened again Tuesday, 8-12" of rain in 24 hours, and 22" measured on Mt. Waialeale. Hanalei Bridge over the River was closed for an extended time, and 150 people sheltered at the Hanalei School. As well, a rare tornado came ashore near Barking Sands on the west shore.

    https://www.thegardenisland.com/2020...to-northshore/

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    Last edited by sleddog; 03-19-2020 at 05:35 PM.

  2. #3692
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    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
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    173

    Default Envolee's PV Race memories

    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Sorry to hear from Nat and Synthia on ENVOLEE that the wind gods have not been in their favor in the ongoing San Diego to PV Race. They are on their 7th day, making 2 knots, 270 miles to go, with an ETA in PV of Sunday, two days after tomorrow's prize giving.. Not unexpectedly, they are retiring from the drift-a-thon and heading to Cabo.
    Hey Skip, Thx for keeping a lookout for us on Envolee. I wish you had a better connection with the wind gods to put in a request for us; we might have made it to the finish line without jeopardy of harvesting the seaweed caught on our rudders as a food source. For your enjoyment I've attached a couple of photos.

    (1) What a sailboat racing crew with wind looks like.
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    (2) What a sailboat racing crew without wind gets to see off the Baja coast midway down. Yes, there was a green flash.
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    (3) What our naviguesser looked like trying to make sense of the incorrect weather models.
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    Ride, captain ride upon your mystery ship. Be amazed at the friends you have here on your trip.
    Ride, captain ride upon your mystery ship. On your way to a world that others might have missed.
    ~ Blues Image

  3. #3693
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    Sep 2007
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    Thanks, Synbad, for the photos. Do we know if ENVOLEE has made it back to San Diego?

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    The photo of CHANGABANG's two FOB anchors (French "Bureau Veritas") brings to mind two memorable experiences with nearly identical equipment while cruising WILDFLOWER, my 27', custom, Tom Wylie design, 35 years ago.

    The first at the Marquesan Island of Fatu Hiva in the beautiful Bay of Virgins, "Hanavave." There were 6-8 boats in the anchorage where the tradewinds blew consistently easterly (offshore) through the gaps in the fantastical rock spires.

    I had sailed from Hiva Oa, 44 miles, and arrived at the Bay of Virgins late afternoon, time to pick a suitable spot to anchor in about 25 feet, abeam two French aluminum cruisers anchored to port.

    Leaving WILDFLOWER , I snorkeled to check out our CQR anchor, and that of the French neighbors. I found the bottom of the north half of the Bay covered with coral bits and rocks, not secure anchoring territory.

    The CQR was a favored anchor of the time, fashioned in the shape of an English field plow. The two French boats had FOB anchors, basically Danforth knockoffs, with all chain. As I snorkeled over their anchors, I noticed the FOB's had not penetrated the hard coral bottom at all. But were lying against some coral rocks..

    That evening, anchored offshore the small village of Hanavave, population 125, turned to inky darkness with no lights ashore. The crews from the two French boats had gathered together, leaving one boat with just an anchor light. There seemed to be much joie de vivre from their cabin, and after a long day, I drifted off to sleep, awaking to shouts and anchor chain being overhauled. WTF?

    I peered out WILDFLOWER's companionway and tried to adjust my eyes to the darkness as one French boat motored by, awning still up, and towing 2 rubber rafts...The other boat was nowhere to be seen.

    As the crew motored by, in broken English, they shouted, "Have you seen our boat?!!"

    I said I hadn't. Apparently the companion boat, with just an anchor light and no one aboard, had blown out of Hanavave Bay and out to sea. I reckoned spotting a white anchor light among the myriad of stars offshore was going to be very difficult. In 4-5 hours since nightfall, their boat could have drifted a dozen miles...As some have disconcertingly observed, when a boat is underway at speeds of >1.5-2 knots, a Danforth/FOB style anchor being towed pops the flukes up, causing the anchor to waterski to the surface.

    I watched as their search lights grew dimmer and dimmer as they searched further offshore....
    TBC
    Last edited by sleddog; 03-27-2020 at 12:00 PM.

  4. #3694
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    Sep 2007
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    San Francisco Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Thanks, Synbad, for the photos. Do we know if ENVOLEE has made it back to San Diego?
    Yes, Envolee made it into San Diego Harbor this morning. YB tracker 1600 UTC position report shows them docked at the small SD Harbor Police marina.
    Last edited by Eyrie; 03-27-2020 at 06:57 PM.
    Ride, captain ride upon your mystery ship. Be amazed at the friends you have here on your trip.
    Ride, captain ride upon your mystery ship. On your way to a world that others might have missed.
    ~ Blues Image

  5. #3695
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Redwood City
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    767

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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    The photo of CHANGABANG's two FOB anchors (French "Bureau Veritas") brings to mind two memorable experiences with nearly identical equipment while cruising WILDFLOWER, my 27', custom, Tom Wylie design, 35 years ago.
    So you're saying I should drop them off and get something else?
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  6. #3696
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    Sep 2007
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    San Francisco Bay Area
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    Personally, I'd add a Bruce or CQR to your inventory. If you have two rodes already, you could just buy the one anchor. You might as well keep both the Danforth-style ones you have already. A 33 pound Lewmar Claw at West Marine is $150. I know it's more weight, but IMHO, and this is just me....here's a place to be sure you have options.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  7. #3697
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    Sep 2007
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    390

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    .here's a place to be sure you have options.
    Opinions about options with anchors among sailors? - never happens

  8. #3698
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiger beetle View Post
    Opinions about options with anchors among sailors? - never happens
    I don't think this forum has the bandwidth to handle an anchor discussion. Besides...

    "Anchors? Where we're going, we don't need anchors!" (Doc Brown)

  9. #3699
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Redwood City
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    767

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    The light FOB anchor is only for mud/sand. The heavy is for all bottom type. If the aforementioned sailors had used a light FOB on corals it was a poor decision. I think I'll have to try to deploy/weigh the anchor once at least, under sail, single-handed. If anyone is interested to join in the fun let me know ...
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  10. #3700
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
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    The next time I encountered an FOB anchor was most unusual.

    Caleta Partida is a circular, near landlocked anchorage, remnant of an extinct volcano. A chilly, midwinter, 3 day northerly was blowing down the Sea of Cortez, whistling off the cliffs to windward. I had two anchors to windward at 45 degrees, not for security but to keep the boat from sailing to the vagrant gusts.

    The winter sun was setting over Isla Partida when a small sloop, about 35 feet, hove into view from around the point. She made a couple of tacks, and then her crew lowered their main and rolled up the jib before motoring in our direction, dropping anchor about 50 feet astern.

    I could see the boat looked like a charter boat out of La Paz, and aboard was a young couple and their child. The husband was on the bow, gesturing in French, to his wife on the tiller aft. Out went some chain and rope, and the rode snugged up as the bow fell off to leeward.

    The sloop kept drifting broadside to the wind. I noticed the husband hauling up their anchor gear, presumably to reset the dragging anchor in the hard pack sand, depth 20 feet. Again they motored at WILDFLOWER, this time stopping 25 feet astern, and again dropping anchor and rode.

    Again the sloop slowly drifted sideways downwind. And away from WILDFLOWER.

    It was almost dark when they weighed anchor for second time. And for the third time they motored at WILDFLOWER, dropping anchor 10 feet astern in the near empty bay. And for a third time they began dragging.

    I began to have sympathy for them, but not sure how to communicate anchor drill in the dark and wind. Clearly panic was beginning to set in as I could see their red and green bow lights coming at us for a fourth time. I left the companionway in time to realize they weren't stopping. Indeed, the sloop came right up to the stern step, and without a word, the husband threw an FOB anchor aboard WILDFLOWER, neatly missing the windvane and solar panel, and landing in the cockpit.

    They then blew backwards while I momentarily stood flabbergasted, then grabbed their anchor chain and secured it around a pushpit leg and to a cleat. All well, WILDFLOWER wasn't going anywhere. And they retired in their cabin, presumably to warm up from hypothermia.

    That's the story. As Scoop Nisker used to say on KSAN, Jive 95, "If you don't like the news, go out and make some of your own."

    Good Health to All.
    Last edited by sleddog; 03-28-2020 at 02:36 PM.

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