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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #4211
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Los Osos
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    37

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    Dunno about hard over, but yes, the receiver can be set up to put her in circling mode to enable my hard-paddling wife to catch up. It will be interesting to see whether she (MAGIC -not Vicky) will heave to. Like many long-keeled craft, MAGIC was a fine one for heaving to, once you slowed the Lady down.

    Thanks to all for the entertaining answers to another one of Sleddog's ever-so-slightly-unusual pop quizzes. We will report back once she is sailing.

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    Last edited by MAGICdreamer; 02-17-2021 at 06:00 PM.

  2. #4212
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    Mar 2018
    Location
    Santa Cruz CA
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    45

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    I guess it was number 8!
    because I was TOLD that when Mini Magic out distanced the radio signal the sails, and the anchor would automatically drop.

  3. #4213
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,949

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    Quote Originally Posted by MAGICdreamer View Post
    Dunno about hard over, but yes, the receiver can be set up to put her in circling mode to enable my hard-paddling wife to catch up. It will be interesting to see whether she (MAGIC -not Vicky) will heave to. Like many long-keeled craft, MAGIC was a fine one for heaving to, once you slowed the Lady down.

    Thanks to all for the entertaining answers to another one of Sleddog's ever-so-slightly-unusual pop quizzes. We will report back once she is sailing.
    don't be thinking that this gets you out of fabricating a quarter-pound version of the CQR plow that I see hanging below big Magic's bowsprit! LOL
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  4. #4214
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    Mar 2017
    Location
    Los Osos
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    37

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    don't be thinking that this gets you out of fabricating a quarter-pound version of the CQR plow that I see hanging below big Magic's bowsprit! LOL
    I will add it to the list, Alan ;-)

  5. #4215
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Bodfish, CA
    Posts
    230

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eyrie View Post
    My guess - 3. MAGIC automatically tacks and assumes a reciprocal course back to her skipper.
    Thanks to Skip for creative choices.

    Choice 3 works for non-radio control pond yachts. The tiller is fixed amidships and sails trimmed to a beam reach. A light line is attached to bow. When the end of the line is reached, the line pulls the bow back to the reciprocal course.

    I would not mind hearing about some of the other options with radio control.

    Ants

  6. #4216
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    Mar 2017
    Location
    Los Osos
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    37

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    Happy 76 trombones, Senor Sled.

  7. #4217
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,425

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    Walking most mornings, being towed by one or two of Annie's dogs, along the Harbor, out the west breakwater, and across Seabright Beach is never dull duty. Just the birds are worth a paragraph: cormorants, pelicans, gulls, plovers, marbled godwits, willets, sandpipers, scoters, loons, grebes, herons, hawks, crows, ....

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    This morning we saw two mallard ducks. They were both on a dock, staring into the mirrored waterline windows of a very expensive large yacht. Mr. male mallard was pecking at his reflection, presumably to show his twin that his consort was already spoken for.

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    As we watched in amusement, the mallard, not paying sufficient attention to his footing, fell into the narrow gap between the dock and the yacht and got stuck. Without enough space to flap his wings, we could see his predicament, as could the lady mallard, who seemed to be saying, "Danny, what are you doing down there? Get out, now!"

    Finally Danny Duck realized if he just let himself relax, he could drop downward into the water, swim under the dock, and re-emerge in safety. Which he did, promptly repositioning himself beside his girlfriend, and began to peck at the window again!

    On we walked across from loud crashes at the boatyard across the channel, where a demolition company with a front hoe and large dump truck was breaking up three abandoned boats, including two 30 foot powerboats and a trimaran. That's what happens at Santa Cruz if you don't pay slip rent, all courtesy of a state program to remove derelicts.

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    Riding home on my bike, I swung by the boatyard to get a better look at the action. By now, the 3 boats were gone. But a large pile of debris remained to be scooped up. What's wrong with this picture? Apparently the fuel tanks hadn't been completely emptied and the debris pile and near surroundings reeked of gasoline while the front hoe operator scraped the ground smoking a cigarette as he operated the controls, WTF?

    "She's a gonna blow," I thought, and fled in the direction of the 70 foot schooner MAYAN, hauled and on blocks to refinish and streamline her 800 pound ironwood centerboard, likely made by Myron Spaulding in 1975 when her original board broke off on a passage from Tahiti to San Francisco. The story goes that owner David Crosby was having a pee off the stern at sunrise when he noticed MAYAN was being followed by a very large manta ray. On closer examination, Crosby saw it was MAYAN's original centerboard being towed by it's winch cable. MAYAN was not very fast, but this was slower yet. So Crosby and crew cut the wire cable and the board disappeared in the aqua blue depths, weaving like the manta ray is wasn't.

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    After 5 of us got MAYAN's centerboard turned over, I retreated for the CBC, 4 miles east..Passing the Harbor breakwater I noticed the dredge was sucking outside the entrance, disposing a 12" pipe's worth of black sludge from sand spoils mixed with rotten kelp into the surf line next to the east breakwater. There were two noticeable things about this picture. One, there was a dredge crew member sitting in his truck on the beach with sensitive instruments to measure the windspeed and direction, as well as the amount of sulfur smell concentration in the air. Should the wind shift onshore in the direction of expensive homes, the entire 10 man operation would shut down rather than risking another law suit.

    As well, if you look closely, there are 2 surfers riding "Lefts and Rights, " the ephemeral and legendary surf break that only appears when the dredge is operating in the near vicinity, making the perfect wave machine.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 03-04-2021 at 09:57 PM.

  8. #4218
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Santa Cruz CA
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    45

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    For the record, among the boats that got chewed up by Randazzo's boat eating DRAGON was a trimaran that our friend Joel Woods lived on for several years prior to trading up to a larger Catamaran, that he single handed to Mexico.

  9. #4219
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,425

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    At the right times of coincidence of wind, weather, and tide, the expansive back bay and estuaries of Morro Bay are a magical place.

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    Fortunately, we experienced this "window" for a 5 day/4 night camping trip that included a birthday hike to the top of a nearby morro (extinct volcano) for sunrise, a paddle with good friends, the MAGICdreamers, an exploration of the waterfront which includes a pygmy forest, native American middens and mortar holes, large sand dunes, sea otters by the dozen and watching a minus tide sunset. And birds, so many birds you could never begin to describe everybody. Wild turkeys, check. 2 dozen white pelicans, check. 2 bald eagles low overhead being chased by dozens of terns, check. Vicky, our local naturalist, knew every bird by its first name as we paddled merrily along, speaking in whispers.

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    Here's the MAGICdreamers in their self built, Thomas Hill designed, ultra-light canoes. Vicky’s canoe, WOODSTOCK, is 11’-6” long, weighs in at 29 lbs and is built from 4 mm ply using glued-lap construction. The rails and breasthooks are spruce while the seatback support crossbar is of AYC. "SPARESTOCK", Craig's canoe built from leftover materials, is stretched slightly to an LOA of 12’-3” and the weight increased slightly to 32 lbs. Both have regular sit-on-top kayak seats, adjustable footrests, as well as carbon 2-piece paddles. Sweet.

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    Morro Rock, sentinel at the north side Morro Bay entrance channel, was once an island. A causeway was built, and the rock was quarried, reducing its size. Eventually Morro Rock was protected, and is now off limits except to nesting peregrines.

    And of course no visit to Morro Bay would be complete without a visit of Baywood Boatyard and Trike Shop to review progress on mini-MAGIC. Winches screwed down? Check. Cap rail complete? Check. Lexan ports fitted? Check.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 03-06-2021 at 08:20 PM.

  10. #4220
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    2,425

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    Interesting observations from Whitall Stokes aboard SPARROW, who is currently less than 24 hours from Charleston, SC, his last port of call after Puerto Williams at the most southern tip of Chile.

    "In other news, my last micro USB cord gave up. The salt air/seawater has gone through at least 4 cords of this type alone. This means I no longer have means to charge the Garmin tracker or the Kindle. The Garmin tracker will give up in about 24 hours, but I think I may still show up on http://www.marinetraffic.com

    The Kindle is a bummer, but we are only 3.5 days away, and I do have one last paper book to digest: From Enlightenment to Revolution (Voegelin). It’s dense, probably why I’ve put it off.

    Which leads me to another learning on this trip. Charge cords really don’t like sea boats. The devices themselves are typically fine, it’s the charging that takes them down. Every charge cord, of every type (USB-A to micro-USB, USB-A to mini-SUB, USB-A to USB-C, USB-C to USB-C, laptop charge bricks) has failed at least once. So the lesson is, hard-wire everything with heat-shrink connectors. Here is a list of devices with charging methods that failed:
    • Laptop (Charge brick, USB-C to USB-C, USB-A to USB-C)
    • Satphone (USB-A to mini-USB, 12v socket to connector)
    • Inreach (multiple USB-A to mini-USB)
    • Handheld VHF Radio (hard-wired charge dock)
    • iPhone (multiple USB-A to lighting)

    I thought a laptop was a better solution as I could set everything up in my living room, practice with Expedition, etc. I didn’t think enough about the charging weakness. Next time a hard-wired fanless mini-PC with a nice monitor, rugged keyboard and mouse.

    Don’t depend on your phone or tablet for anything. Salt will get up in the charge port and then it’s done. If you have one onboard, store them in a baggie and be careful. A growing problem is these days more and more things have an app to go with them. My Victron charge controllers and battery monitor, and the NKE system for example. There are work-arounds but they cost money, of course."

    Good advice from "Out There."

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