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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3761
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daydreamer View Post
    #6 Though I haven't found it specifically I believe a type of mite could make a home upon the plastic.
    #4 There is a particular cold molded Express 27 that is the original mold for subsequent hulls. Dianne
    Thank you! #6 is not a type of mite. Much bigger and faster. Certainly the fastest thing going for its size in the Pacific High. #4 As SK may enlighten us, his DIANNE was not the original mold for the E-27.

  2. #3762
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    Dan Newland wrote about the passing of dear friend Jocelyn Nash. He could not have said it better.

    Hey guys

    I was saddened to hear about the passing of Jocelyn Nash. She died April 7 in her sleep, she was really one of the people I really loved. I was lucky enough to phone her maybe a a couple of days before she died, just calling to say hi and see how she was doing. She didn't sound very well and she let it slip that she had just picked up some oxygen at Hospice. She was also living with Chris, having left her apartment in Point Richmond since she needed help, (I sailed with Chris in a Transpac many years ago). What a wonderful person!

    She was such a hoot! I loved working with her at DeWitt Sails in Pt Richmond so many years ago, she had the gift of enjoying helping people and was a true resource for anyone that wanted to know how to do this or that on their boat. As a salesperson for DeWitt, you could always trust her to find ways to save you money by recutting an old sail or getting one sail to do double duty rather than selling you a lot of new sails. I always admired her for that.

    She will be missed.

    Here are some snippets, the first is a preview of a movie, the second
    her obituary :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fz1v...rr_watch_on_yt

    https://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2...-jocelyn-nash/

    Stay well!

    Dan
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-09-2020 at 10:46 AM.

  3. #3763
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Rob,
    "Dancing stars reflecting in smooth water." and "sailing in a bowl stars" is just about the nicest visual of crossing the Pacific High at night I can think of. Thanks for that.

    However, question 6 remains unanswered. "What is alive, lives in the Pacific Gyre, does not live in the water. Nor flys in the air. And never touches land?" The answer is not bacteria, algae, dinoflagellates, plankton, velella, crabs, barnacles, flying fish, nor metaphoric.

    Although 300 million years old, these amazing oceanic creatures were not discovered until the early 19th century, probably because of their ability to quickly become invisible. Curiously, they benefit from the increase in ocean discarded plastic refuse, but probably not for food or shelter.

    How widespread are they? Let's just say that during 4 days of crossing the Pacific High on WILDFLOWER they were never not in view except when I tried to catch one.
    Rob should get credit for “most correct answers” AND the best mental visual while most of us stay at home.

    I’m pretty sure the answer to #6 is Blue Glaucus (either Glaucus atlanticus or Glaucus marginatus or maybe even Glaucus mcfarlanei), also known by several other common names including Blue Angel and Blue Dragon. These are pelagic nudibranchs that live floating upside down on the surface by using the surface tension of the water to stay up. Their blue side, facing upwards, blends with the blue of the deep ocean, while their silver/grey side faces downwards, blending in with the reflected sunlight when viewed from underwater.

    https://oceana.org/marine-life/coral...s/blue-glaucus
    Last edited by Dazzler; 05-08-2020 at 10:11 AM. Reason: Added link
    Tom P.

  4. #3764
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazzler View Post
    Rob should get credit for “most correct answers” AND the best mental visual while most of us stay at home.

    I’m pretty sure the answer to #6 is Blue Glaucus (either Glaucus atlanticus or Glaucus marginatus or maybe even Glaucus mcfarlanei), also known by several other common names including Blue Angel and Blue Dragon. These are pelagic nudibranchs that live floating upside down on the surface by using the surface tension of the water to stay up. Their blue side, facing upwards, blends with the blue of the deep ocean, while their silver/grey side faces downwards, blending in with the reflected sunlight when viewed from underwater.

    https://oceana.org/marine-life/coral...s/blue-glaucus
    Thanks, DAZZLER! But the Blue Glaucus pelagic nudibranch, although a fascinating pelagic critter I'm not sure I've seen, is not the answer to the quiz. The Blue Glaucus can live at depth, as well as on the surface.
    It is also poisonous.

    Our creature, and correct answer to which I am seeking, though an inhabitant of the Pacific High, does not live in the water, and would die if it did so. In addition, it is not poisonous. And unlike the Blue Glaucus, it is so fast that if you blink when approaching, it can be gone. There are no wings or fins involved.
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-08-2020 at 11:03 AM.

  5. #3765
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    I'm at a disadvantage here, as I've only been in the fringes of the High!

    If it's "fast" then it's not single-celled, nor is it a plant. So it must be an animal. Vertebrae or invertebrate?

    i'm thinking maybe you're referring to Japanese fishing boats!
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  6. #3766
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    No worries, Alan. Although the answer to #6 of the quiz predominates in the Pacific High, they are found elsewhere in increasingly large aggregations, usually between 40N to 40S. You've likely encountered them. But maybe didn't realize it at the time.

    "Is it a vertebrate or invertebrate?" you ask. The answer is "Yes, it has a skeleton." But don't be misled. So does a starfish and an Alerion 38.

    Is your guess a "Japanese fishing boat?" If not, you can guess again and not wait 24 hours.
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-08-2020 at 12:00 PM.

  7. #3767
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    No worries, Alan. Although the answer to #6 of the quiz predominates in the Pacific High, they are found elsewhere in increasingly large aggregations, usually between 40N to 40S. You've likely encountered them. But maybe didn't realize it at the time.

    "Is it a vertebrate or invertebrate?" you ask. The answer is "Yes, it has a skeleton." But don't be misled. So does a starfish and an Alerion 38.

    Is your guess a "Japanese fishing boat?" If not, you can guess again and not wait 24 hours.
    No, not "Japanese Fishing Boat!" LOL
    The only thing that I've encountered in "large aggregations" is velella vellela , the By The Wind sailor jellyfish. That, and a couple of different kinds of birds, like scaups. But velella velella is hardly "fast".
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  8. #3768
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    No, not "Japanese Fishing Boat!" LOL
    The only thing that I've encountered in "large aggregations" is velella vellela , the By The Wind sailor jellyfish. That, and a couple of different kinds of birds, like scaups. But velella velella is hardly "fast".
    Welcome aboard. We've already ruled out velella velella in post #3758. I'm sure someone knows the answer. I've handed out sighting reports to passage makers who may be frequenting here. Tom? Sylvia?

  9. #3769
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    I'm at a disadvantage here, as I've only been in the fringes of the High!

    If it's "fast" then it's not single-celled, nor is it a plant. So it must be an animal. Vertebrae or invertebrate?

    i'm thinking maybe you're referring to Japanese fishing boats!
    There is a Halobates water strider that is pelagic, I have spent a lot of time looking for them and never seen one.

    Skip, is this what you're talking about? If you've seen them I'd love to learn about it!

    - rob

  10. #3770
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiger beetle View Post
    There is a Halobates water strider that is pelagic, I have spent a lot of time looking for them and never seen one. Skip, is this what you're talking about? If you've seen them I'd love to learn about it!- rob
    "First to correctly answer all the below within one week in one post wins an autographed copy of Randall Reeves cool new book, The Figure 8 Voyage. Multiple submissions allowed, but please wait 24 hours between posts. Max guesses = 3"

    Good thing this friendly competition is not being held under the RRS. Otherwise, it's beginning to resemble rounding Blossom Rock in the Corinthian Race..Somebody might have to go to the penalty box.

    Rob's submissions, even though one was outside the allotted time frequency, have been so entertaining and enlightening that I am hoisting Code Flag Sierra and congratulating him on answering all 6 answers of a really tough quiz...Rob is the only one to tell us both dancing stars and halobates live in the Pacific High and spinnakers can be flown from the mainmast of schooners and therefore he wins F2F.

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    Halobates are water walkers, aka water skimmers, sea skaters that you've likely seen in quiet streams and ponds. Halobates Sericeus is one of very few oceanic insects and predominates in the Eastern Pacific and specifically the Pacific High (Gyre.) Halobates Sericeus can lay as many as 70,000 of her bright orange eggs on a piece of plastic debris. Hairy legs create small bubbles they use to walk on water. And they can move very, very fast when disturbed by the bow wave of an approaching boat.

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    My technique for observing Halobates at sea was to slow speed to just steerage in the glassy conditions of the Pacific High and hang my head over the bow. For days on end, in one sweeping glance port to starboard, I would see thousands. Did I mention they can hop 6" off the water? And their exo-skeleton is UV resistant?

    Although they are there, wind waves and increased boat speed makes Halobates Sericeus difficult to see. They are nearly impossible to catch, except using a fine trawl net at night, thus the paucity of information on this fascinating bug. Yes, it doesn't live in the water, nor in the air. But on the interface between.

    You may have fresh or salt water halobates in a backyard pond, nearby lake or stream, or dock slip. If anybody can provide us with a visual sighting and location of a halobates in the next 24 hours, your prize will be a Capitola Boat Club "Dark and Stormy." (ginger beer, Pellegrini, a shot of dark rum, lemon slice, ice, and a tad of Marianne's Macapuno.)

    Rob: can you contact me your snailmail address so I can send Randall's new book? skipallanatsbcglobaldotnet

    Thanks, all, for participating.
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-08-2020 at 01:49 PM.

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