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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #4061
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    and of course who rescues him? Jean Le Cam!
    Why is this "of course"? What is the history?

  2. #4062
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    Why is this "of course"? What is the history?
    On January 6, 2009, during the 2008-2009 Vendée Globe, Vincent Riou, then the skipper of PRB, rescued Jean Le Cam from his upturned IMOCA 60 which capsized at Cape Horn.

    In this race, JLC, age 61 and a 5 time vet of the Vendee Globe, has been pushing the leaders with his non-foiling YES WE CAM! He's been the sentimental favorite of millions of French since the start..

    These are the conditions JLC effected the rescue of KE off PRB, except it was dark. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROHd...ture=emb_title
    Last edited by sleddog; 11-30-2020 at 10:50 PM.

  3. #4063
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    Aaaahh. This is most excellent.

  4. #4064
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    Talk about structural problems... not much one can do when;
    "in 4 seconds, the boat nosedived and the bow folded 90 degrees... It folded the boat in 2."

    Amazing work by RC and 4 other skippers to sail to him and coordinate a grid search inside of 3 hours.

    details here

  5. #4065
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    Here's the story from Kevin E of PRB. Most amazing really. For those wondering, Kevin E. will likely be transferred to a ship at Kerguelen Islands. Meanwhile Jean Le Cam continues his race and Kevin is not allowed to help, except perhaps to drink some of JLC's Burgandy.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~/)~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    KE: Yeah, I still have a hard time realizing what happened. the thing is we were all approximately in the same place, we were going at it a little with Jean, Seb Simon, Boris Hermann, and Yannick Bestaven, and the wind was coming in, I had rolled the small gennaker I had been under for some time and that was giving me good speed, and I was, I had brought it down and I was preparing myself for stronger conditions, so I had a main sail with two reefs and a J2, so a smaller sail in front, in conditions that were maneuverable to start with and the wind was starting to come in at 30 knots, and that's when I went into... a surf with the boat, because the wind was coming in I was on deck... surf... at the bottom of the wave the boat nosedove into the wave, but like it happens to us very often, and then I felt something unusual was going on, and in fact the boat never came back out, and when it came back out the boat was broken in two, and when I say broken in two I mean there was a 90 degree angle, at the level of the mast foot, between the front and the back of the boat. And there I... saw... like if someone had opened a dam's spillway, water going up very very quickly, that first cut the engine, it was charging because I was filling up the batteries for the wind to come to be sure to have enough energy, and then it powered off everything onboard, I just had the time to send a texto to the organization, to my technical team actually, and then I jumped on the TPS, because, the water was going up very very quickly, I had water up to the knees already so I managed to jump on, take my TPS and get out of the boat before the water, the water was already at 3/4 of the boats door.

    Jacques, a word to Kevin?

    JC: Well a word, we saw each other, we longingly talked with Jean by skype because we practically lived their landing in to cockpit live, so it was an incredible moment, and what I can say is congratulations to these two sailors because there's combined experience, and I don't think you do something like this without experience.

    Kevin, so we can understand, we're not used to it of course, how did things go afterwards in the liferaft?

    KE: So to start off, in those moments I had very little time to make a decision, water was going up so fast, an imoca isn't supposed to be able to sink, and I had that in mind, so there were two things, it was either I stayed on the boat, or I was going on a liferaft, I wanted to stay on the boat as long as possible because for me it was was the most safe, the only doubt I had was that since the boat was broken in two, and that the part I was on was the one connected to the keel the boat was in fact heavier with less floatability reserves and I was seeing it go down very quickly, so I wanted to go secure the lifeboat that is normally at the bottom of the cockpit, but the water was already at the level of the boat's deck, the level of back of the boat's deck, so I pulled the liferaft from under the water to put it on the deck of the cockpit, and when I was trying to secure it the boat heeled over, a wave broke over the deck and threw me in the water with the liferaft, so I didn't have a choice in fact between staying on the boat and going in the water, so then I was in the water, I activated the liferaft, I had the grab bag I had managed to get a hold of on my back and a distress case I was keeping with me, that was inside the boat, up high, that's how I had been able to recover it, and at that point I was in the water with all that, I managed to activate the liferaft and climb into it, and then I kept on looking, and during 15 minutes I was still seeing PRB's bow pointed straight up, that's why I could still see the boat, I quickly lost sight of it obviously considering the state of the sea, and at that point in the raft I activated a beacon, the big beacon I recovered on the boat, and a small beacon that I have at all times in my sailsuit, and in fact the TPS, I had so little time that I put it directly over my sailsuit, so I managed to pull the beacon out of my sailsuit's pocket, I activated it too, and that's how Jean managed to recover me from what I understood the first time, because we lived the events but from two different viewpoints, and the conditions at that time made a transbording impossible, jean arrived with two reefs, I could see that it was very difficult to control the boat, it was pretty impressive to see an imoca, you're in a liferaft, to see an imoca luffing going right by, we exchanged two words, we signaled each other to temporize, and I understood, I knew that the weather conditions were going to get better so I told myself listen Kevin you're on a liferaft, you can spend the night in it and tomorrow it will be dayliht and the conditions will be simpler, it's better than taking the risk of having a bad transboarding where things can turn bad, and that's when I waited and spent the night in the liferaft, listen, I closed the zip, I felt the waves regularly coming against the raft, I fed on the survival rations, I drank a little water to try and stay zen, I continued to think positively, telling myself that guys were on zone, that I had been seen, I told myself don't panic, something will happen eventually, and so that's it, I tried to sleep a little too, but not too much so that, and what's surreal is that I was starting to wait for the sunrise and I then hear a sail flap, I hear a sail flap, I open the zip, I put my head outside and I see Jean heading straight for me, and I tell him "we're doing this now?", and he says "yeah, now, now!", and then he tells me "I'm going to come rest against you.", and then I see, because I see the maneuver he's doing you know, he starts to drift, in order to drift towards the raft, and then it gets to let's say 5 meters, the boat with it's momentum gets in front of the raft, Jean throws me a line with a buoy, when I say a buoy it's kind of like the buoys you put around the waist at the pool to play with the kids, it's the same thing, I managed to get a hold of it, I put it around the waist and I stayed in the raft and Jean and me both tried from our ends to pull on it, give a little slack so Jean could tack it to the boat and reduce the distance between us, and we reduced the distance as much as we could, up to the point where I could let's say jump, jump as well as possible, because he was going full in reverse with the engine, and sometimes I was seeing, in the waves, the back of the boat that was going up, the propeller that was coming out of the water

    Yes, surrealist, really

    KE: You see the scenario, quite a sight when you're waking up, yeah it was, and I managed to grab a rudder bar, watching out for the hydrogenerators, because hydrogenerator blades cut into skin like butter, so I jumped on the rudder tubing and Jean helped me climb onboard and at that point I can tell you it was a big sigh of relief, and thank you TPS, thank you TPS too.

    For us too it was a relief of course. Yves Auvinet, you must want to react.

    YA: Yes, it's pure happiness to see them both together on screen this morning, pure happiness because it's true that last night, in the night with Jean Jacques we were waiting, and Jacques... allows me to thank the race direction for the work done, and it's pure happiness to know them, to know Kevin is safe and my hat off to Jean, it's unanimous, on our territory, but well beyond our vendeen territory, because it's... we say the vendee globe is a human adventure, but it's a human adventure that goes beyond everthing we can hear from many other competitions, and frankly, to seem them both here it's.. very moving.

    Yes, it is moving. Jean how... after all it's nearly a remake, in reverse, of course we're thinking about 2008, how are you seeing this now today, 10 hours after this adventure?

    (they exchange headset again and the host repeats the question)

    JLC: Yeah you can say that. In 2008 I was the rescued and this time I'm the rescuer, so we're going from the rescued to the rescuer.

    So we call you king Jean, it's god Jean

    JLC: No, it's that... well I hadn't done that yet, so I had to... so... it's done now, and of course it's with PRB... coincidentally of course, of course right... sometimes fate... you wonder... sometimes scenarios are hard to come up with, but this one... the first part of the race was already a scenario that no one imagined and now it rebounds into a "one again"... so.. that's that

    So what's your program for the next hours?

    JLC: Well the program is that, to start with, all of Kevin's cloths are drying, there's water dripping so Kevin is squeezing them from time to time, because we're a little alike we don't like to have water inside the boat, so... there's that, then well... well we'll send up a reef at some point because right now we're getting eaten up by the high pressure... so we'll have to... but we haven't had much time since this morning.

    Of course, we're going to leave you, really thank you to have been with us. Yves Auvinet maybe you would like to thank them too?

    YA: Yes, that's for sure, solidarity between skippers has been proved once again last night, bravo to both of them and bravo to the three other skippers that deviated from their course to meet them, under coordination from Jacques next to me, but... Kevin take care of yourself and Jean get back to your race and we will be really very very happy to welcome you at the sables d'olonne.

  6. #4066
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    "JLC: Well the program is that, to start with, all of Kevin's cloths are drying, there's water dripping so Kevin is squeezing them from time to time, because we're a little alike we don't like to have water inside the boat, so... "

    OK, save a life/get your life saved and then after a bit of celebrating start worrying about getting those clothes dry because, of course, neither Kevin or Jean like water in the boat.... Classic.

  7. #4067
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    It will be interesting to see which Tuamotu atoll Whitall chooses as a pit stop for repairs aboard SPARROW. Most likely Raroia or Hao. Likely Hao, as it provides more lee on the west side...Most unlikely Whitall will enter an atoll pass as they are dangerous to the extreme, and he's without engine. Hao's entrance passage into the lagoon gets 20 knot currents with bores. What's a bore? It's another name for whirlpool.
    My guess is Whitall will heave to in the lee, or possibly anchor on a sandy shelf outside the atoll.

    Here's Raroia:Name:  raroia.jpg
Views: 23
Size:  13.4 KB and here's Hao:Name:  hao2.jpg
Views: 21
Size:  4.3 KB

    Can anyone tell us what notable shipwreck occurred on Raroia?
    Last edited by sleddog; Today at 05:33 PM.

  8. #4068
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    That would be Thor Heyerdahl - they fetched up here while attempting to demonstrate that settlers in the South Pacific could have arrived from South America.

    And I thought a bore was a series of waves, not a whirlpool. I've been in to Fakarava, and there were 6' standing breakers at the entrance until flat water at slack. Beetle is not a rubber extreme rapids raft - I stood off until a boat inside the lagoon called back on the VHF and pointed out that the outflow would stop in a while and it might be a good idea of I waited until then. Two hours later the North Pass was a mill pond.

    An interesting detail about currents at atoll passes - the atolls do not have built-up land, but rather the perimeter is the remnant of breaking-down coral. When the waves are large and from the south east the breakers will roll over the coral and continually fill the atoll's lagoon, resulting in zero flood and instead present lots and lots of continual ebb to the boater attempting to enter the lagoon.

    - rob/beetle
    Last edited by tiger beetle; Today at 05:42 PM.

  9. #4069
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiger beetle View Post
    That would be Thor Heyerdahl - they fetched up here while attempting to demonstrate that settlers in the South Pacific could have arrived from South America. ....And I thought a bore was a series of waves, not a whirlpool. rob/beetle
    Beetle,
    Correct on both accounts. Thor Heyerdahl and his crew aboard the raft KON TIKI fetched up on Raroia atoll in 1947. Name:  kontiki2.jpg
Views: 9
Size:  266.3 KB

    https://www.ourspace.si/en/blog/raro...story-kon-tiki

    As well, a tidal bore is a steep fronted standing wave that begins the flood tide up a river against the current, usually at an extreme low tide. The bore moves upstream. There are approximately 60 famous tidal bores in the world, the Bay of Fundy being one. Here's a tidal bore near Mont St. Michel in France: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3ftWPSj-JE

    Are there tidal bores in the San Francisco Bay area? I believe so from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3MUhuhFjRo
    Can anyone identify the location?
    Last edited by sleddog; Today at 07:35 PM.

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