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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #4951
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    Mar 2018
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    For the record, the Kayak Wildflower was seen enjoying near perfect conditions at the 0700 hour this AM!

    And I am also in the TP anti motor camp!
    Last edited by Howard Spruit; 07-04-2022 at 11:53 AM.

  2. #4952
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Spruit View Post
    For the record, the Kayak Wildflower was seen enjoying near perfect conditions at the 0700 hour this AM!
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  3. #4953
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    Name:  Glaciersunk1.jpeg
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    Much of Glacier Bay, AK, is deep and steep to. Hard to hit something unless you are not paying attention, which apparently the Grand Banks 66 CATS N' DAWGS was not. Knowing their protective nature, I'm sure the National Park Service is not pleased. Vessel ultimately sank in 150 feet at mouth of Muir Inlet after hitting Caroline Reef. 4 crew rescued uninjured by nearby CG.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 07-04-2022 at 06:51 PM.

  4. #4954
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    This just in to CBC from the School of Hard Rocks.......
    "Lessons Learned in Pursuit of the Art of Seamanship"

    Yet Another Lee Shore Blunder
    By Stan Honey

    “We had not had the opportunity to lie alongside a dock in months. When the opportunity presented itself, with the associated benefits of showers, a shore-side BBQ, and electricity to run a heater, we were smitten.

    But the forecast was for increasing wind that would have the dock be on a lee shore with over a mile of fetch. On the other hand, the locals said that it was magic, there was never significant chop, and the wind never blew from that direction. We enjoyed the showers, the BBQ, the electricity, the fresh water, and stayed alongside for the night.

    As forecast the wind picked up during the night, as did the chop. By morning it was blowing about 15k, straight onto the dock, with the chop building. To make matters much worse, the dock was at the end of a narrow inlet with zero maneuvering room ahead or behind the dock. In the calm of the night before, it would have been trivial to just push the bow off and motor to the weather side of the inlet and anchor, but no longer.

    There was, however, an open mooring that was close to weather, close enough to tie to with a spinnaker sheet. Our escape plan was to row out to the mooring, tie a 10-foot bowline to it, and take the line to Illusion’s bow. Sally would pull in the line, pulling Illusion’s bow off the dock, and Stan would fend off the stern to keep it off the dock. This was feasible as it was still only blowing 15-20 knots. That part of the plan worked but was hard work. Memo to file: it would have been handy if the anchor windlass had a capstan on it. That would have made this part easy and fast. Another improvement would have been to run the bow line to a self-tailing winch on the mast. But in any event, this part worked.

    Soon Illusion was dangling from the mooring, clear of the shore, but still far too close to the lee shore for comfort. Stan and Sally changed positions with Sally starting the engine to get it ready, and Stan pulling Illusion right up to the mooring where he could reach, and when ready, untie the bowline.

    For double-handed sailing and anchoring, we use a set of SENA Expand headsets, which we love. They allow perfect communications over 100’s of meters. They worked great, and Sally confirmed that she was ready before Stan untied the bowline and let the mooring go.

    Several mistakes occurred here. Sally should have put the engine in gear early and made sure that we had propulsion. Stan should have waited for the mooring line to go slack before casting off. Neither happened.

    Instead, Stan noticed to his horror that the bow was blowing back towards the rocks rapidly. Stan rushed back to the cockpit, quickly fiddled with the shift control so that the engine went into gear, then used full throttle and full helm to try to turn before Illusion ended up on the rocks just adjacent to the dock.

    Illusion started to gain way and turn. We both were dreading the crunch of the rudder hitting the rocks as we made the turn. Despite our mistakes, our luck prevailed, and we just made the turn and got away without damage. The rudder appeared to have just cleared the rocks by inches.

    Lessons learned (again):

    Be very afraid of lee shores.
    Listen to local knowledge but trust your own judgment.
    Check your ability to shift into gear and propel the boat in forward and reverse before casting off a mooring or leaving a dock.
    See #1, again, because it can’t be said often enough."

  5. #4955
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Spruit View Post
    For the record, the Kayak Wildflower was seen enjoying near perfect conditions at the 0700 hour this AM! And I am also in the TP anti motor camp!
    Thanks Howard, Just when I thought I had seen everything, I had not. There leading the Monday Pac Cup starters, going higher and faster on port tack in the soft southerly breeze of 8 knots, higher and faster than the Moore 24's, Express and Antrim 27's, and BobJ on SURPRISE! was none other than SOLIS. SOLIS is a Hans Christian 43 and legit Pac Cup entrant in the Holo Holo Class.

    It took some research to figure out what was going on. But I finally got it figured why SOLIS has stretched her lead to 4 nautical miles over the nearest boat. Macapuno treat to the first to identify why SOLIS is smoking her competition.

    1) two retired Star Class World Champs in her crew including Bill Beacon and Lewis Hamilton.
    2) a foretriangle "J" measurement bigger than a Santa Cruz 70.
    3) a new "Tweener" from Dave Hodges at Ullman sails
    4) choosing an inshore lane to gain adiabatic puffs coming down canyon off the nearby Coast Range.
    5) engine in gear at 1750 RPM
    6) #1,#2 and #3
    7) None of the above, but instead she mistook her starting day.
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-04-2022 at 10:23 PM.

  6. #4956
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    Jul 2016
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    Bodfish, CA
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    Number 4 inshore lane

    Ants

  7. #4957
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    Apr 2014
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    31

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    #5 Definitely motoring. From the Pacific Cup 2022 NOR:

    5.1. Cruising Division
    The Cruising Division will race with an allowance for motoring.

  8. #4958
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grace View Post
    #5 Definitely motoring. From the Pacific Cup 2022 NOR:
    5.1. Cruising Division
    The Cruising Division will race with an allowance for motoring.
    GRACE nails it. SOLIS has been motoring since the start. And if she wished, and had enough fuel, could motor the entire Pac Cup Race without penalty. A Hans Christian 43 displaces 32,000 pounds, or about 12X what a Moore 24 weighs and twice what a Cal 40 displaces. SOLIS would not usually be in contention for the boat for boat lead. But there she is, furthest south and chugging along at 1750 RPM. Yiii doggies. SOLIS is hell bent on not missing any post race parties!
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-05-2022 at 09:56 AM.

  9. #4959
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    Mar 2018
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    Santa Cruz CA
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    Just a silly thought, about motoring to the islands for the party.
    Fuel is expensive!
    boats are cheap in Hawaii so it could be less expensive to ply over there buy a boat to hang out with the parties and sell it for plane fair home.

  10. #4960
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    Jan 2010
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    My friend Tony Bourque's boat was dialed in. His Freedom s/v Circe was ready and so was his significant other, Carol/Patch. Their kids were all aboard, and so was a friend. Tony kept the SHTP 2023 in his head: After a nice family vaca across the ocean and in Hawaii, he would be ready, at last, for next year's singlehanded event.

    Unfortunately it looks like this year's plan has been upended. I suspect seasickness in those rolling swells is what caused them to turn around. Tony's a little like Cliff that way: Doesn't make a big deal writing about sailing, but he's great chatting around a big table at RYC. He'll let us know.

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