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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3961
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Live in Phoenix, boat in San Diego
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    269

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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Good job.
    Lee
    s/v Morning Star
    Valiant 32

  2. #3962
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,756

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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Last time I looked, as recent as last year, Mercurys still raced out of Monterey and Stillwater. And the class had some real heavy weight competition. The Mercury is ideally suited to those localities, as the aft rake of the keel and keel hung rudder means kelp doesn't hang up and they can race through kelp with impunity. No other boat, big or small, one design or custom, can do that. Long live the Mercury!
    I knew the Monterey fleet was going strong, did NOT know that there were still Mercuries in Stillwater! YAY!

    If I hadn't bought the Piper, a Mercury was on the short list as the "last boat". Winning anything in that class is mighty tough, a bunch of those guys are really good sailors and have been in the class for 20, 30, 40 years.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  3. #3963
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    2,256

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    The Ocean Cruising Club exists to encourage long-distance sailing in small boats, with members required to complete a continuous ocean passage of at least 1000 nautical miles in a vessel not more than 70 feet overall length.

    The OCC seeks to be the true ‘Home Port’ for the ocean-going sailor, and with the cyclone season approaching the Southern Hemisphere on November 1, there is concern for those in the region.

    After last-ditch effort letters to both Prime Ministers, OCC received formal rejections by both Australia and New Zealand on September 18, 2020. Here is their report:

    NEW ZEALAND
    The OCC initially wrote to the Health Minister in April and again more recently has written to the Minister and Prime Minister. When asked about providing cyclone season refuge for cruising yachts in COVID-19 limbo in the South Pacific, two weeks ago the Prime Minister said on live television that she would speak with the Health Minister about taking into account seasonal conditions (TV3 AM).

    Despite the Prime Ministers’ remarks, the Director General for Health wrote September 18:

    “The legal basis for the current restrictions at the Maritime Border is the COVID-19 Public Health Response (Maritime Border) Order (No 2) (the Order). The foundational rule of the Order is a ban on all foreign ships from arriving in New Zealand, unless explicitly exempt or granted permission by the Director-General of Health.

    “There are a number of limited exemptions in place, such as for cargo vessels to unload and load cargo, fishing vessels to unload catch and resupply, Defence and State vessels to enter and depart New Zealand. As the Director-General of Health, I can also grant permission for ships to enter if there is a compelling need for the ship to arrive in New Zealand for reprovisioning or refuelling , carrying out a refit, refurbishment or repair to a ship or for humanitarian reasons.

    “Having received advice from Ministry of Health officials, I have determined that a potential future cyclone does not provide sufficient basis to warrant an exemption from the Order.

    “While I will determine whether permission is granted for a ship to arrive in New Zealand for humanitarian reasons on a case-by-case basis, my assessment is that the vessels in question are not facing a cyclone at present, but rather the prospect of a potential cyclone or cyclones in future. Therefore, there is no compelling need for the ships in question to arrive in New Zealand for humanitarian reasons.

    “I will still determine whether there is a compelling reason for a ship to arrive in New Zealand for humanitarian reasons on a case-by-case basis, should a cyclone arise in anyone location. I appreciate that my decision will come as a disappointment to you and your members. However, I hope that clarity on my decision will allow your members to make immediate alternative arrangements, enabling them all to secure safe harbour (e.g. in their home countries) in a timely fashion.”

    Unfortunately, despite many explanatory letters and emails, health officials do not appreciate most cannot sail to safe harbor in their own country, nor understand yachts need to be safely out of the cyclone zone, not at sea and seeking shelter in New Zealand when one occurs!

    The yachts in Fiji and French Polynesia and other Pacific islands must now risk tropical cyclones in locations which do not have the capacity for safe mooring or dry storage. Prudent and safe navigation is to move small yachts out of the cyclone zone before the cyclone season occurs, this takes many weeks of sailing. These yachts are the home of families and couples.

    NZ Health has a number of exemption applications before it, many for two months. The outcome of these remains to be seen. Yachts with plans for refit and/or who have a compelling need other than cyclone refuge can still apply for an exemption.

    Since April, OCC has been working with Sail South Pacific and the Marina Operators Association and has been liaising with immigration and maritime agencies. COVID safe and quarantine protocols were developed and have been put into place. The OCC would particularly like to thank John Martin and Chris Galbraith for their efforts for the cruising community.

    AUSTRALIA
    The OCC initially wrote to the Health and Border Force Ministers in April and again more recently has written to the Prime Minister. After receiving a letter in June advising of the exemption process available, the OCC conducted a pilot, all five boats were rejected.

    The OCC has been supported by a Senator who has advocated at the highest possible levels for cruising yachts. Recently, one last attempt was made with the group exemption application, involving a letter to the Prime Minster and a groups of over 20 yachts.

    The Senator ensured this was again considered at the highest possible levels, but to date the only known exemption granted for a cruiser is a US crew member on an Australian owned/skippered yacht, apparently gained with Fiji High Commissioners’ assistance.

    The OCC received the following from Australian Border Force on September 18:

    “The Commissioner has considered the request and has decided the following:

    • There is no impediment to the Australian citizen and permanent residents travelling to Australia.
    • The grounds for compelling/compassionate circumstances are not met.
    • The inability to get insurance is not on a basis on which to grant an exemption.
    • There is no information to support the proposition that any of the travellers or vessels regularly come to Australia.
    • The travellers may wish to consider other options in relation to the travel/cyclone season.
    • The travellers may wish to consider whether they may present as a significant economic activity for a State or Territory and seek their support.”

    Yachts may still apply for an exemption.

    The OCC has been working with Down Under Rally and Bundaberg Port Marina. COVID-19 safe and quarantine protocols were developed and have been put into place. The OCC would particularly like to thank John Hembrow and Brett Hensler for their efforts on behalf of the cruising community. We especially wish to thank our Senator (who remains eager to assist), hopefully, we can do this publicly soon!

    OCC CONCLUSION
    There is little more the OCC can do. With the impending cyclone season, crews should be considering the best possible location to sit out the season and have a cyclone refuge plan in the event one occurs.

    Whilst we have run out of time, crews with ongoing concerns can contact their embassy/consulate to seek their assistance.

    Source: OCC

  4. #3964
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    Many sail solo for varying reasons...

    Good friend Charlie R. sails his Catalina 270 KAIMANA solo nearly every day out of Santa Cruz.

    Charlie has no aspirations of racing, cruising, anchoring, living aboard, or going fast. Sailing under jib alone is just fine. Charlie's aspirations are to sail as many days as possible, and to someday see his anemometer reach 30.0 knots.

    As of today, Charlie has sailed ~1,300 times in 5 years since his retirement, and 208 times this year alone.

    Today we sailed KAIMANA under main and 110% jib. Motored to the windline just south of Lighthouse Point and took off on a beam reach in 18 knots of wind. Sailed out a couple of miles in warm wind, gybed, and reached back with swells astern, occasionally riding waves to 7 knots. "Fastest I've ever gone," exclaimed Charlie.

    Just inside Mile Buoy the seabreeze lightened, then dropped away as we motored across the 50 yard "transition" and into the 8-10 knot easterly, which took us close reaching back to the harbor, where we sailed into the slip.

    Just another fine day for Charlie and KAIMANA.

    And for me, having a fresh pair of eager ears for sea-stories.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 09-23-2020 at 08:27 PM.

  5. #3965
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    Winches R Us since age 9, when Dad mounted a used bronze South Coast #2 on the family L/36 just forward of the aft deck lazarette hatch, where I was safely positioned during a race and stood hoping a sheet would be passed my way to be trimmed on my winch.

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    While sailing IMPROBABLE in the early 70's we became friends with Derek Baylis, designer and engineer of the first two speed winches for the Barient Company. What a concept for sailors: high and low gears! Even double grip winch handles of varying lengths.

    With Derek's help, IMPROBABLE had something even more advanced for her day; lightweight titanium drums for wire (!) jib sheets and well as cross linked primaries, so the leeward winch could be ground from a windward side "anthill."

    22 years ago I raced DH to Hawaii on a custom, 60' cruiser/racer.. Besides the anchor windlass, the boat was fitted with one, all purpose, electric winch. What a revelation. All of a sudden, reefing the main, hoisting the spinnaker or a man aloft, and a myriad of other heavy lift sail handling jobs turned from a chore to a pleasure when short handed sailing.

    But with this advancement in winches came new considerations, the most important being safety. Not only was I to see in following years that mismanagement of electric winches could rip a sail in half, but also bring down a mast when the foot button to the running backstay accidentally was stepped on.

    Even more serious was an afternoon sail on SF Bay when the owner of a 50 footer went forward to demonstrate the ease of reefing with his electric winches near the companionway. Somehow this experienced sailor got a finger in the halyard wraps as the winch turned. And back at the helm I was the recipient of a flying body part.

    Fortunately we got the boat to the dock where the owner and his missing member were rushed to hospital surgery where the digit was successfully reattached. But it was a wake up call. Danger, Will Robinson! Many crew, especially the less experienced, do not have competent winch skills when a winch is under load. If put in charge of an electric winch without skill and experience, carnage can result.
    Last edited by sleddog; 09-30-2020 at 02:53 PM.

  6. #3966
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    2,256

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    Though smoke, heavy at times, covered the state from Capitola to the High Sierra, we were fortunate to catch a break Monday when the skies cleared and we cruised Tenaya Lake, 8,150', on our SUP's. Near shore, the water was warm enough for swimming. We saw no other vessels, the wind was 2-6 knots from the SW, and Clouds Rest, 9,900' and 6 miles distant, was reflecting its white granite in the afternoon sun. Thanks to Annie for good company and the below photo of sleddog on a circumnavigation.
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    Last edited by sleddog; 10-08-2020 at 11:17 AM.

  7. #3967
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    Jan 2010
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    2,481

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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Thanks to Annie for good company and the below photo of sleddog on a circumnavigation.

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    Welcome back, Skip! Beautiful scenery!

  8. #3968
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Bodfish, CA
    Posts
    199

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    Luck is good when traveling during the smoke season. The smoke rolling toward Bishop was not exactly on little cat feet (reference Carl Sandburg). It was also happening from Mammoth through Mono Lake, but the smoke was so thick you could not see it.
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  9. #3969
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Live in Phoenix, boat in San Diego
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    So, it is back to Plan A.

    Morning Star and I will depart San Diego tomorrow for the Channel Islands. On October 27 (or later as weather presents) we plan to leave from there for the Hawaiian Islands, expecting to reach Hilo by mid-November. Same tracker, new page name: https://share.garmin.com/MorningStar. No password needed; share at will. Aloha.
    Lee
    s/v Morning Star
    Valiant 32

  10. #3970
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Live in Phoenix, boat in San Diego
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    269

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    This has been great fun so far. Nice weather, pleasant anchoring and mooring around Catalina Island, and plenty of time well spent on punch list stuff from the refit and other little projects. And a little relaxation before the passage to Hilo. He he.

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    Thanks to Dolfin Bill, I was able to connect-up with Skip and Annie who were here in Howland’s Landing for a couple of days. Many thanks to Bill for that and to Skip for all the great intel and stories on sailing Hawai’i.

    I have been tinkering again with the connection between the steering sheets from the wind vane to the adapter on the wheel. Going to try that out today with a sail across the channel to the harbor of Long Beach/Los Angeles where we will pick up a mooring near the Belmont Pier for the night. With an eddy bringing SE winds the next two days we may be sailing for Santa Cruz Island Thursday/Friday.

    The forecast for next week seems to favor a Tuesday departure for Hilo, which is good, as that will be day 14 since last time ashore. While I had tentatively planned to launch from somewhere in the northern Channel Islands, it now looks like Catalina Harbor would be a better jumping off point. If the forecast holds, we wll probably be heading due south to avoid a wind hole growing in the So Cal Bite. It would be fine with me if we get a close pass of Isla Guadalupe, another island I have always wanted to see.
    Lee
    s/v Morning Star
    Valiant 32

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