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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3711
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    From the archives. Nassau, Feb. 1971. Crew L to R: Commodore Tompkins, Ron Holland (sweater), Tom Wylie, Dave Allen (red shorts), sleddog (headband)

    Will leave to your imagination how well a shaggy crew in Easy Rider shirts from San Francisco, and a fast downwind red boat went over in S.Florida in the early 70's.

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  2. #3712
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    What a beautiful boat. Lotsa beds for friends and the liquor cabinet is to die for. When are you going up for a ride, Skip? That would be a great boat for the Delta, too.

  3. #3713
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    Sep 2008
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    SF Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    From the archives. Nassau, Feb. 1971. Crew L to R: Commodore Tompkins, Ron Holland (sweater), Tom Wylie, Dave Allen (red shorts), sleddog (headband)

    Will leave to your imagination how well a shaggy crew in Easy Rider shirts from San Francisco, and a fast downwind red boat went over in S.Florida in the early 70's.

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    Worth noting are the telltails everywhere, even on the antenna. All too much focus these days on electronics.
    Looks like North Sails, probably from the Sausalito loft where I was working at that time. But Commodore’s hat is a custom limited edition Peter Sutter creation. Somewhere in a box I have the same hat. There was a little store in Sausalito that specialized in buttons and the trim Sutter used on those hats.
    Tom P.

  4. #3714
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    May 2015
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    Redwood City
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Feb. 1971
    Yep, when I was born ...
    P___/)___J
    Solo RTW

  5. #3715
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    End of an era yesterday when Matson's SS KAUAI (720') was towed out the Bay and under the Golden Gate for a last time, bound for Panama Canal and the shipbreakers in Brownsville, TX.

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    Captain Bob, on this Forum, served as Chief Mate on KAUAI beginning in 1983, and was one of her captains 1996-2002. I was fortunate to share a voyage, Seattle to Oakland, aboard KAUAI in April, 2000. Her usual loop at the time was Seattle/Oakland/Honolulu. During the Holidays, KAUAI was famous being Hawaii's Christmas tree ship, always news on Hawaiian TV.

    We departed Berth 25 at 1600 and steamed out Admiralty Inlet at 22.6 knts, a beautiful evening. Dinner was served in the officer's mess, steak and chips.

    At 2030 we discharged the pilot at Port Angeles, with the moonlight reflecting on the snow clad Olympic peaks.

    By mid-night we were approaching the western entrance to the Straits of Juan de Fuca. My cabin was one floor below the bridge. With the KAUAI steaming into the fresh, 30 knot breeze at 19 knots I could feel the bows of the ship, and my bunk lifting to the ocean swell. Presently, I was becoming airborne, as well as the steak and chips.

    In my darkened cabin I found the door and hiked upstairs to the bridge for some fresh air to cure my queasiness. I slid open the port side wing bridge door and stuck my head out.. air temp was 34 and apparent wind 50 knots...and that was the first time I experienced being seasick in over 30 years of small boat sailing right on Capt. Bob's freshly varnished wing handrails.

    The next morning, at 0600, we were steaming downwind at 22 knots abeam Columbia River mouth, 30 miles distant. KAUAI was burning 1,000 barrels of oil/day firing her steam turbines. At the time, fuel was $30/barrel. From Chief Engineer Boyd I got a tour of the engine room and all the way aft in the tunnel to the rudder shaft and steering gear. The autopilot piston was getting a workout from it's controls 600 feet forward.

    By 1600 we were abeam Port Orford. With 25-30 knots of breeze from astern and KAUAI's speed overground at 22.6 knts, the apparent wind was almost nil..balmy conditions going our direction.

    At 1800 we were abeam the California border, snowcapped Mt. Preston, 7,310', visible 40 miles off the port side. We passed three ships headed north: a car carrier; another Matson ship, the SS MAUNALANI; and a tug with a barge in tow 3/4 mile astern. That's a lot of cable!

    Early next morning, with the full moon setting to starboard, the Farallones and Pt. Reyes were in sight ahead. At 0615 we picked up our pilot, Capt. Crowell, and steamed under the Golden Gate with an ENE wind at 25 knots. Down the City front, the Captain slowed from 16 knots to dead slow as we entered the Oakland Channel and by 0815 we were secured alongside.

    Thanks, Captain Bob, for a memorable voyage on your old ship. Sad to see her go for the last time...

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    Last edited by sleddog; 04-07-2020 at 10:55 AM.

  6. #3716
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    Hope all are well.

    You know the drill. Once we are safe to visit and local businesses hopefully reopen, first to correctly answer the quiz below wins a cup of Marianne's Macapuno ice cream with pomegranate topping at CBC. As well, special inside info from a previous winner of the 3BF how to pick your route in 2021 using a piece of free lesser known equipment/information.

    This time you get one guess, and I will respond whether your answer is right or wrong. Contest ends 3 days after this posting.

    Who was the first to solo the Pacific?

    1. Wylie Post
    2. Keniche Horie
    3. Francis Chichester
    4. Harry Pidgeon
    5. Amelia Earhart
    6. Joshua Slocum
    7. Bernard Gilboy
    8. Peter Bird
    9. Juan Elcano
    10. Tupaia
    11. John Voss
    Last edited by sleddog; 04-13-2020 at 12:52 PM.

  7. #3717
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    Dec 2012
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    Alameda CA
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    OK, I'll start the ball rolling with #7 - Bernard Gilboy.

    Interesting that there are a number of First Solo's on the list, but since you didn't specify direction, non-stop, or by air or sea, I'll go with the answer above.
    DH

  8. #3718
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    OK, I'll start the ball rolling with #7 - Bernard Gilboy.
    Interesting that there are a number of First Solo's on the list, but since you didn't specify direction, non-stop, or by air or sea, I'll go with the answer above.
    DH
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    I will consult with CBC's Board of Directors about possibility of converting Hedgehog's accumulated winnings of ice cream, banana bread, and wine into something more useful for his predicament, like a gallon of epoxy and some carbon fiber.

    Again, DaveH has barely let the ink dry on my quiz before he sprang with the correct answer. Bernard Gilboy crossed the Pacific, 7,000 miles over 160 days in 1882-83, from San Francisco to Australia in his 18 foot schooner PACIFIC. An amazing story, barely heard of, Gilboy did not seek notoriety, and just 6 copies of his book, predating Joshua Slocum, exist.

    At the beginning, there is a mystery: What happened to Gilboy's wife and child, who did not come to the wharf to see him off. Then too, after capsizing and having his main mast, rudder, and nav tools swept away near Fiji, Gilboy ran out of food, causing dire straits. In between times, he created a minor navigational mystery of discovering an uncharted island, not altogether improbable given the quality and detail of charts and navigational tools of those times.

    Thanks to FROLIC for putting us in touch with the correct answer to the Quiz. You can read Gilboy's book online here: http://digital.slv.vic.gov.au/view/a...e&usePid2=true
    I believe it may also be an audio book.
    Last edited by sleddog; 04-14-2020 at 12:22 PM.

  9. #3719
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    Congratulations, Mr Hedgehog! How’d you get so smart? I’ll bet you read a lot.

  10. #3720
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Name:  Gilboy.jpg
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    I will consult with CBC's Board of Directors about possibility of converting Hedgehog's winnings of ice cream, banana bread, and wine into something more useful for his predicament, like a gallon of epoxy and some carbon fiber.

    Again, DaveH has barely let the ink dry on my quiz before he sprang with the correct answer. Bernard Gilboy crossed the Pacific, 7,000 miles over 160 days in 1882-83, from San Francisco to Australia in his 18 foot schooner PACIFIC. An amazing story, barely heard of, Gilboy did not seek notoriety, and just 5 copies of his book, predating Joshua Slocum, exist.

    At the beginning, there is a mystery: What happened to Gilboy's wife and child, who did not come to the wharf to see him off. Then too, after capsizing and having his main mast, rudder, and nav tools swept away near Fiji, Gilboy ran out of food, causing dire straits. In between times, he created a minor navigational mystery of discovering an uncharted island, not altogether improbable given the quality and detail of charts and navigational tools of those times.

    Thanks to FROLIC for putting us in touch with the correct answer to the Quiz. You can read Gilboy's book here:
    https://archive.org/details/voyageof...ge/n9/mode/2up I believe it may also be an audio book.
    That's a fascinating little boat and a unique rig.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

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