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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3501
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntsUiga View Post
    Another topic would be compensation for the crew - the appearance of a corinthian sport. Currently, fully paid crew and support is common. But in the 70's and 80's, any discussion of compensation seemed to hushed.
    Ants
    "Corinthianism," meaning only amateurs could race, ruled the waves from post WWII to the early 1990's. Even at the top of my game in the 1960's-80's, it was illegal to be a "professional" and get paid for what I did best: sail a boat safe and fast.

    I might be given a room and airfare. But even joining a yacht club was out-of-bounds, and I was blackballed from membership in such clubs as my home town Santa Cruz Yacht Club, as well as the Royal Hawaiian Ocean Racing Assoc.

    One of the most ignominious results of having the appearance of being a professional sailor happened in 1983 aboard SCARLETT O'HARA.

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    As top boat in the '83 SORC SCARLETT O'HARA had won the right to go to England and represent the USA in the prestigious Admiral's Cup. I was designated tactician, navigator, and downwind helmsman. At the last minute, JBK flew into town, saw my name on the crew list, and as self designated "Team Captain" gave SCARLETT's owner an ultimatum that I was to be excused from the crew. Pissed and without recourse for the innuendo I was a "pro," I spent the Series stranded in Cowes, walking the beach, unable to sail with my teammates.

    So how did I make not very much money in those days? Like WMT Jr., we delivered boats back from races for the princely sum of $1.00/mile. I was also good at varnishing, rigging, and wet sanding bottoms.

    The first remunerative prize I won was 44 years ago in the Capitola Begonia Festival Rowboat Races of 1975. Competition was in orange, heavy duty, well thrashed, wooden fishing skiffs launched by hoist from the Wharf. These skiffs were never meant to be rowed, just to fish and drink beer, and most Row Boat Race competitors spent the race going in circles as their 2 person crews sat side-by-side, each pulling an oar.

    We figured early on that the best way to row these orange slugs was for my crew lady to pull, and me to row standing, facing forward, pushing on the oars like a Gloucester doryman. Our course out and back was 200 yards, and we finished before most of the competition crossed the start line, thereby winning donated coupons for two free dinners at a local upscale restaurant.

    Was my Corinthian status in jeopardy?

    After a long tradition, the Capitola Begonia Festival ended 2 years ago when the last begonia field became condominiums. But the Rowboat Races continue. Yesterday I rode my bike down to Soquel Creek to spectate the action. The RC had two aluminum skiffs, one with longer oars than the other, and were timing two boat heats from the Stockton Ave. bridge, up and under the RR Trestle to a buoy anchored nearby. Then return to the finish line.

    There were 4 age categories: Under 11 years, 11-15, 16-35, and the "Masters," over 35. Each boat had a rower and a passenger, and most competitors figured early on the best passenger was a youngster weighing less than 50 pounds.

    Like the Begonia Festival Race which we'd won 44 years ago, it seemed rowers still hadn't mastered the use of oars. Maybe because most small boats are now days powered by outboard motors. Some rowers even ended up tangled in shoreline vegetation.

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    I reckoned I could still row OK, and decided to enter for kicks, even though lacking a crew. Just before my start was called, I found a young lady willing to go along for the row. Knowing these aluminum skiffs rowed stern heavy, I requested my lady crew to please sit in the bow. This caused some consternation, and the lone RC told me through his loudspeaker to get my crew in the back. WTF? Unwillingly, we complied with this arbitrary rule.

    At the RC's command, off we went. I was confident we could win our heat until I saw the competition: a big strong guy half my age with his young son as passenger. Not only that, Big Guy had a powerful stroke, and the longer oars to boot.

    We got the jump at the start, and halfway to the turning mark held a 2 length lead. With the shorter oars, my stroke rate was about double his. Slowly Big Guy overhauled us from behind and to port. I could see that by the turning mark we'd be even and he'd likely have a stronger stroke against the wind on the last leg.

    Measures needed to be taken to preserve our lead. 3 lengths from the turning mark I hailed "were gonna need room at the mark!" I doubt he knew that was sailboat racing jargon. We arrived at the turning mark bows even. The RC at the finish line on the loud speaker could see the water churning as we began our turns. But the buoy was lost from his sight.

    I knew where the buoy was as I backwatered with my port oar and pulled hard with the starboard oar to spin around the buoy, leaving it to port. The Big Guy was confused, and left the buoy to starboard (there was no requirement for rounding protocol.)

    We met bow to bow and I used my best tugboat imitation to gain the inside as the aluminum hulls went "boing."
    Pushing him to the outside of the turn gained us 3 lengths for the return. Again my strokes were fast, and I wasn't sure I had the wind and heart to make it all the way.

    But here came the Big Guy was his strong stroke overtaking again from behind. Spectators were cheering as the Big Guy's bow pulled even with our stern. I figured I had a dozen strokes left in me, and if we didn't cross the finish soon, I was done.

    Beep, beep went the RC finish horn. We'd won by 2 seconds, fastest time of the day. Hurray for old farts and their knowledge of sailing rules.

    Dang, no free restaurant coupons this year. Just a blue ribbon. I rode my bike back to the CBC, hungry, but satisfied I'd preserved my Corinthianism.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 10-03-2019 at 05:10 PM.

  2. #3502
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Bodfish, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    obviously this is a test run for the support vessel for the Napa RAID...
    The bus weighs in the neighborhood of 20,000 to 30,000 pounds. The two hulls seem actual since the further one is influenced by lean of the bus. The support structure with iron beams and wooden supports seems plausible.

    The steering does not seem plausible. A form of propulsion would be needed. It is hard to note any wake from the stern. There does not seems to be any cables or lines that would pull or guide the assembly.

    Wacky to say the least. Photoshop or optimists in action.

    Ants

  3. #3503
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    **High 5's and ~fist bump~.** Skip!

    Nice!
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  4. #3504
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    A couple of guys on another sailing forum took some cheap shots at a certain small multihull recently listed on Craigslist, to which I took mild offense.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  5. #3505
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    Sep 2007
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    Sad news from the Village of Yelapa, 15 miles southwest of Puerto Vallarta, on Banderas Bay. The recent passage of Tropical Storm Narda brought heavy rains and 100 year flooding that damaged or destroyed large parts of the area. https://twitter.com/i/status/1178510939584421889

    So much rain runoff was funneled into the El Tuito river, usually a knee deep stream, the main bridge was washed away, all the restaurants, 3 markets, the hardware store, and many homes and businesses were filled with muddy water and remain uninhabitable. The town wharf is now surrounded by a mud and sand berm. Many pangas were sunk or washed to sea. No water, power, or internet, although those are slowly being restored.

    Locals are resilient. But coming shortly before tourist season this devastation is sure to cause continuing hardship.

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    https://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/sto...ive-in-yelapa/
    Last edited by sleddog; 10-04-2019 at 09:55 PM.

  6. #3506
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    Sep 2007
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    Good friend Capt. Bob is a connoisseur of dinghy docks. On a recent vacation to the California Coast, Bob found four dinghy docks of note: Catalina Isthmus, Cat Harbor, Monterey, and Sausalito.

    Combining a sailor's eye and artist's composure. Bob shares with us his favorite, the Monterey Wharf dinghy dock.

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    Thanks, Cap!

  7. #3507
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    At 3 pm, today, Saturday, October 5, by AIS locator measurement, Randall is 572 nm from the finish of his Figure 8 Voyage when he sails under the Golden Gate, Noon on Saturday, Oct. 19th.

    Thats 14 days to cover the remaining distance. He's gonna have to slow to an average of 1.7 knots to not be early.

    Randall really wants to get home and off MOLI. How's he gonna slow down? Heave to? Nope. Anchor at Pt. Reyes? Maybe. Anchor at Half Moon Bay? Not likely. Turn off his AIS and sneak into SF Bay in the dark of night, then put back to sea for his fireboat welcome? Nope, he'd likely be recognized.

    What do you think Randall's tactics will be to slow down for the remaining 570 miles so as to be on time for his celebratory homecoming?
    Last edited by sleddog; 10-05-2019 at 04:14 PM.

  8. #3508
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    At 3 pm, today, Saturday, October 5, by AIS locator measurement, Randall is 572 nm from the finish of his Figure 8 Voyage when he sails under the Golden Gate, Noon on Saturday, Oct. 19th.

    Thats 14 days to cover the remaining distance. He's gonna have to slow to an average of 1.7 knots to not be early.

    Randall really wants to get home and off MOLI. How's he gonna slow down? Heave to? Nope. Anchor at Pt. Reyes? Maybe. Anchor at Half Moon Bay? Not likely. Turn off his AIS and sneak into SF Bay in the dark of night, then put back to sea for his fireboat welcome? Nope, he'd likely be recognized.

    What do you think Randall's tactics will be to slow down for the remaining 570 miles so as to be on time for his celebratory homecoming?
    Anchor at Port Orford just under Cape Blanco..?? Bad in a southerly though. Maybe go into Tomales bay ... close to home

  9. #3509
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Randall really wants to get home and off MOLI. How's he gonna slow down? Heave to? Nope. Anchor at Pt. Reyes? Maybe. Anchor at Half Moon Bay? Not likely. Turn off his AIS and sneak into SF Bay in the dark of night, then put back to sea for his fireboat welcome? Nope, he'd likely be recognized.
    At 0800 this Monday morning, Randall is 426 miles north of Pt. Reyes, ambling along at 4-5 knots.
    That's 3 days to his apparent penultimate anchorage, the backstage waiting room at Drakes Bay.
    All well, except likely Tuesday night/Wed. morning MOLI will encounter gale force, 30-40 in gusts, in our own Windy Lane off the N. Cal Coast. In season, Windy Lane lives there 50% of the time, so not unexpected.
    I wonder if Randall will divert into Bodega Bay? Tomales, just south, with its bar entrance seems unlikely. Randall does not like bars.
    We apparently know why Randall is not finishing this next weekend, Oct.12-13th, as could likely be done. Fleet Week and the Blue Angels will be in town...no room for the weary. He'll wait until noon, Oct. 19th.
    Unless he doesn't.
    .
    Last edited by sleddog; 10-07-2019 at 03:37 PM.

  10. #3510
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    A small voyage in small craft with best friends in delightful wind and weather is certainly God's gift to sailors.

    C, V, A, and myself, members of the Morro Bay Schooner Association and the Capitola Boat Club rigged our little fleet mid-morning to explore the estuary, shoals, currents, and wildlife on the inside and east of Morro Bay Spit just north of our campsite in Montana de Oro State Park.

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    Vessels were two ultra-light Thomas Hill designed canoes. WOODSTOCK at 11.5' and 29 pounds and SPARE STOCK, 12.25' and 32 pounds, both beautifully crafted by their owners, as was WEE BONNIE, flagship of our little fleet.

    WEE BONNIE, a truly lovely Iain Oughtred 20' Sooty Tern yawl, is as easily rowed as sailed. And with her centerboard, WEE BONNIE, double ended like her smaller sisters, is one of the finest examples of perfectionism in design, construction, and good looks I have encountered.

    Our cruise began port tack reaching north from the launch ramp in 12 knots of wind and 2 knots of ebb. Returning on starboard tack against the tide, we found WOOD STOCK towed nicely behind WEE BONNIE.

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    Negotiating edges of newly replanted eel grass shoals where once thousands of Northern Brant geese overwintered on Morro Bay's salt water marshes, we beached for a picnic on the Sandspit with Morro Rock looming in the near distance in the warm afternoon sun.

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    Sleddog checking out the Norwegian Tiller.

    Though we did not see them this expedition, in the sand dunes at our backs lives a small population of burrowing owls.

    For further information of the Sooty Tern, visit this excellent short video: https://www.offcenterharbor.com/vide...ed-sooty-tern/
    Last edited by sleddog; 10-12-2019 at 08:51 PM.

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