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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #1891
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    Dec 2011
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    Santa Cruz
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    For the record The trivia prize luncheon And interesting company at the Capatola Sailing Center was Excellent.
    Thank you MR. Sled

  2. #1892
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    I still have a sweatshirt from my very first Farallones race, which was also in the last century. Somehow, it's kind of too tight, now. Must've shrunk.
    Maybe you will wear it to the Fiasco skippers mtg?

  3. #1893
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    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    Maybe not a good afternoon to go sailing off Eureka (CA).?

    01 18 1:50 pm S 35.0 knots gusting 46.6 knots
    01 18 12:50 pm S 42.7 52.4
    01 18 11:50 am S 42.7 54.4
    01 18 10:50 am S 42.7 52.4
    01 18 9:50 am SSE 38.9 52.4

    That would be Force 9 on the Beaufort Scale. Small pets and chickens should be tethered.

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    Here's WILDFLOWER in Force 8-low 9, happy to have a 1,063 foot ship, 10 stories high, as a windbreak.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 01-20-2017 at 08:18 AM.

  4. #1894
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    Sep 2007
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    AlanH perusings are much appreciated: To the point, experience based, and colorfully descriptive. "Bumptillion gallons, snortzillion boats." Thanks, Alan, come by anytime.

    Alan recently mentioned a SCAMPI-30 as a good possibility for the SHTP.

    there are two great boats currently for sale on Craigslist... the Scampi 30 and the Albin Cumulus.
    But honestly, that Scampi 30? The boat has a working diesel. It's a great design, they made about a bazillion of the mark iii's and they're still cruising all over the Baltic, not to mention probably 50+ on the East coast of the US. I've been beaten by Scampi 30's.

    Peter Norlin nailed it on that boat's design. Look at YouTube, there are umpty-ump Scampi 30 videos on there. The Scampi 30 has a big cabin and a dinky little cockpit. That's great for singlehanding and doublehanding, everything is within reach. Offshore, if you take a wave in the cockpit, you're not filling up a bumptillion gallons of water. There's a nice bridgedeck to put the traveler on...the primary winches are right there...it's a tiller boat. Sure it's an IOR boat with big headsails and a little main, but you don't HAVE to fly that 155% every time.


    I second the SCAMPI-30. I first met Peter Norlin, the SCAMPI designer, in the 1971 Florida SORC series. He and a crew of 4 big Swedes were sailing SCAMPI #1. And living aboard. Their SCAMPI was kicking butt, even though they were new to Florida waters. It was hard not to like these guys and their little boat.

    The SCAMPI has two good things to my eye. The rudder is hung on a small skeg, protecting from damage as well as adding tracking capabilities. I added that idea when I built WILDFLOWER in 1975. In addition, Norlin was ahead of his time and designed the SCAMPI with an aft chine, making the boat stiff, and a good "break loose" surfer downwind.

    For the 2018 SHTP and beyond, a SCAMPI would be a good little boat. Hans Vielhauer raced one, MACH SCHNELL, in 1978 SHTP. And had nothing but praise. Capable of a 12.5-13 day passage, with a PHRF 186 rating, finishing inside 15 days, competitive to win.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 01-20-2017 at 08:52 AM.

  5. #1895
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    San Francisco Bay Area
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post

    Here's WILDFLOWER in Force 8-low 9, happy to have a 1,063 foot ship, 10 stories high, as a windbreak.

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    I remember....I mean, obviously I wasn't there but I sure remember reading about it all, later. Maybe not your happiest day on the water, hmm?
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  6. #1896
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    Peter Norlin is one of my favorite designers from the previous generation. Peter worked within that "Nordic" tradition that Hannes Groop (International H-Boat, my first "racing" boat), Hakan Sodergren, and even Paul Elvstron designed in. Yet, like all of those, he sometimes blew up that usual "long, skinny, and light" tradition. The Scampi 30 was apparently one of his first successful designs. Talk about hitting it out of the park on your first pitch!

    Just for giggles....the post that Sleddog references points to two good boats that would be just great singlehanders...the Scampi and the Albin Cumulus. Heh...they're both designed by Peter Norlin. Other boats to his credit inclue..."maybe", 'cause Yamaha isn't talking... the Yamaha 30 and 33, a mess of boats for Sweden Yachts, a mess of boats for Albin, including the Cumulus, which I think is outrageously handsome.

    Personally, with the exception of the Sparkman and Stevens boats of that era...Tartan 30 and Yankee 30, the Scampi 30 is probably THE boat I would choose from that time for a long offshore passage. If I recall correctly, "Red Dragon" raced in the SSS for quite a few years in the late 1990's and early 2000's and did very well. I certainly remember looking at that red transom from the cockpit of my H-Boat.
    Last edited by AlanH; 01-20-2017 at 12:21 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  7. #1897
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    Sep 2007
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    San Francisco Bay Area
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    Since we're on the subject of older half-tonners....

    When I got started in this whole sailing-shorthanded thing, I did a lot of reading. A book that was extremely influential in my "mental development" (no comments, please!) was "Blue Water, Green Skipper" by Stuart Woods.



    It's the story of Stuart, now an extremely successful pulp mystery-crime novel writer, and his preparation for the 1972 OSTAR. He starts out racing mirrors, then gets enamoured of the idea of crossing the Atlantic in the OSTAR. The book is not *that* well-written, but it's not bad and it certainly clicked with me at the time. It's worth the read, if you can find a used copy.

    The boat he took across was a Ron Holland half-tonner, a Golden Shamrock. The Golden Shamrock was one of Rons first forays into custom racing boats...he was a young unknown back then. The Golden Shamrock was the production version of the custom boat. An evolution of the Golden Shamrock became the Silver Shamrock; the hull shape forward is similar but aft of the cockpit there are some huge differences between Silver and Gold. It's pretty typical of the IOR boats of it's time, and it looks *Very* different from a Scampi.





    A lot of Silver Shamrocks were made in Ireland...not as many Golden Shamrocks,but still probably 50+ boats. The overwhelming majority are sailing out of the UK.

    So...about eight years ago I was boatless and looking around various listings and I came across this...

    http://www.sailingtexas.com/sgoldenshamrock30100.html

    I did a double-take and finally called the guy. Yup, it was Stuart Woods boat..."Golden Harp" that had done the OSTAR. He'd sold it on the East Coast after the race and it had banged around the Northeast for 30 years. I thought hard about buying it, in fact if you search way back on this forum, you'll find posts by me about doing just that. It probably wouldn't have been a good choice for me, it needed a ton of work and I would have had to ship it out here, but the emotional tug was hard to resist. I still have the owners e-mails from back then. If a megadump of money fell out of the sky on me, I could see getting it out here, closing my eyes, and returning her to her past glory, just "because". She'd still be a fun boat to knock around the Bay in.


    What books and boats influenced you, as you were coming along?
    Last edited by AlanH; 01-20-2017 at 12:08 PM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  8. #1898
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    Sep 2007
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    527

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    I can't say this was an influence, because I only heard of it about 15 years ago. But another half-tonner that floats my boat, also built in Ireland I think, is the Achilles 9 meter. The designer Chris Butler did an OSTAR in it. Nice cosy cockpit, not too beamy, nice looking ... but I've never heard of one in the US.
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  9. #1899
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    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    1/21/17

    Storm surf locally. Monterey Bay Buoy reporting 30 foot swells (estimated average height of the highest one-third of the swells.)

    Breakers about as far offshore as can be seen in the reduced visibility. At least half a mile, maybe more. That puts the water depth between 25-35 feet. 3rd Reef is breaking frequently. This morning, spray was being tossed upward to the top of the Santa Cruz Lighthouse, 60 feet above the waterline.

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    It's a rare morning when no surfers are in the water at Santa Cruz. This is one of those days.
    Last edited by sleddog; 01-21-2017 at 11:55 AM.

  10. #1900
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    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    Consider this: At one time San Francisco Bay had an estimated 300 near one-designs, varying in length from 55-70 feet. These heavily canvased sailing craft had adjustable sprits and centerboards, They were usually sailed, even raced, Double-Handed, although Singlehanded was not unusual.

    A most unusual thing about these boats was they were rigged with traditional slab reefing (shortening sail from the top down and tying in reef points.) But in addition, they were frequently reefed from the bottom up. Yup. The main was raised and the main boom went higher up the mast.

    What was this class of boat, and why "reefing from the bottom up?"

    (Unfortunately, DAZZLER is DSQ from this Quiz, 'cause he knows the answer. But doubt he's reading, as Tom and Sue are off to dive Bonaire. No 3BF for them.)
    Last edited by sleddog; 01-22-2017 at 09:44 AM.

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