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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #2001
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Humboldt Bay
    Posts
    134

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    Turning a line through a block 90 degrees ("L" lead) increases the strain at the turn by a factor of 1.5. Turning a line 180 degrees ("V" lead) increases the load at the block by a factor of 2 (doubled).
    This is why I like to reef at the mast.
    This does look like poor workmanship as Bob mentioned..."not though bolted" WTF.

  2. #2002
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Santa Rosa
    Posts
    602

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    Seriously! Makes you wonder about the other turning block and even the stanchion? I don't see any evidence of fasteners? Was it welded? Glued? It looks like the edges follow a cut-out section - and look like the "oval" lines around the other turning block. Has the deck been "overlaid as some time? The insulation might make it difficult, but I'd have a look at all the other "deck mounted" fittings under load to see if something's happening.

  3. #2003
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,464

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    The boat was originally built by Derecktor, a very reputable yard for aluminum construction. The white spacers don't look original to me, and likely helped lever the block in a bad way. Yes, that makes all the other deck gear suspect!
    The deck may have been overlaid after the build. That looks like faux teak..

  4. #2004
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    1,970

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    Time to do a little rummaging around below the deck.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  5. #2005
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,464

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    Time to do a little rummaging around below the deck.
    Looks like a large poptop off a beer can. Same principle, I believe. So ya fill the space with 5200, and rent an elephant for the afternoon to stand on the offending piece, and you are good to go for another 20 years.

    I think I mentioned a while back we had a dissimilar aluminum accident when the main accidentally jibed due to autopilot DUI during the Pac Cup. It was aboard a 60 foot Wylie aluminum cutter, and when the boom came across, breaking the preventer "fuse," the mainsheet caught the binnacle, roll bar, and wheel, bending them forward and flat to the cockpit floor.

    For a minute Tom and I were stunned. Nothing for it but to lead a spinnaker sheet to the prone steering gear, thence aft to a block on the backstay tang, and to the electric cockpit winch. Gently, we pressed the button, and slowly raised the equipment back vertical. 10 minutes later we were back sailing.

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    Couldn't have done that with fiberglass.
    Last edited by sleddog; 03-17-2017 at 05:51 PM.

  6. #2006
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay
    Posts
    284

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    This is all speculation... As usual, there are probably multiple factors combined that caused the failure. But in summary I'd say trapped water under the teak overlay led to corrosion of the aluminum deck at the welds. Failure resulted from dynamic over-loading of the turning block.

    I think that is real teak. If you look at the second photo, you can see where it had been recently cleaned. And you can see some splintering. 20 year old boat? Undoubtedly, the teak overlay had been redone at some point and it looks to have been glued down. The failure parallel to the toerail appears to be along a weld seam. There was probably moisture trapped along the toerail with no way to get out. Pretty interesting.

    It's really interesting to think about how sail "fabrics" and line materials have developed since this boat was built 20 years ago. Both have become stronger and now have much less stretch to absorb dynamic loads. Engineers think in terms of static loading and dynamic loading. When a boat launches off a wave the dynamic loads may be 2-3 times greater than the static loads. Back in the late 60's a few boats experimented with wire sheets with Dacron tails to reduce stretch. Funny thing happened with some of those early experiments: winches and turning blocks got pulled loose.

    So as you add those high-tech low-stretch lines and carbon sails to your good old boat, think about the weak links.
    Last edited by Dazzler; 03-17-2017 at 09:18 PM.

  7. #2007
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Santa Cruz
    Posts
    108

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    About the peeled up deck...
    I can see the damage to the aluminum, and the teak. I have always beed terrified by the slingshot potential of turning blocks, and the lack of through bolts.

    BUT, what I really am impressed with and would like to know is, what kind of glue was used, when installing the turning blocks to the teak?
    Last edited by H Spruit; 03-18-2017 at 08:35 PM. Reason: my grammar & spelling was different than what I originally posted so I changed it back...??

  8. #2008
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wylieguy View Post
    I sailed against "MELODY" in Sausalito beer can races a long time ago. I seem to remember a nice guy named Peter sailed the boat and he was a musician - hence the name. And I crewed a few times with him on other races. It wasn't "duded" up for single handing then, but I think the compass cover dates back to the day. I saw the boat on Craigs List. I think you got a great buy on a great boat. -- Pat
    Yes it was Peter Myrner who owned the boat back then. The gentleman I bought the boat from acquired it in 2003 and was a very good friend of Peter.

  9. #2009
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    5

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    Thanks, Skip, for posting the story about the Rendevous Islands. We passed them in 2007 on our way to Haida Gwaii. I'm sure I noticed them on the chart but did not pay particular attention. My brother and I will be passing that way again this June on our way to the Broughtons. I will be sure to look for them this time and pass along your story to my brother.

  10. #2010
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    19

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    Attachment 2217 Bill Ficker. Great guy, wonderful sailor, true gentleman.[/FONT][/QUOTE]

    Skip, I love that photo of the two of you! I remember Bill's measured, friendly voice, and encouragement of little kids starting in sailing and racing. He was respected by all at NHYC and beyond.

    --Your little sis.
    Last edited by Sleddog_sis; 03-20-2017 at 07:35 AM.

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