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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #2101
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    Gary Cabralero built a sloop on a hull he took out of the Frog 21 mold, He had a partner who may have taken the boat to Redwood City.
    The guys that took my boat to Jackson hole Also took Gary's sloop rigged boat up there.

  2. #2102
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    Quote Originally Posted by H Spruit View Post
    Gary Cabralero built a sloop on a hull he took out of the Frog 21 mold, He had a partner who may have taken the boat to Redwood City.
    The guys that took my boat to Jackson hole Also took Gary's sloop rigged boat up there.
    Would be curious if anyone has sailed Jackson Lake? Looks like a possibility:

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    Here's one of Howard's Frog21's on Jackson Lake:

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  3. #2103
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post

    Here's one of Howard's Frog21's on Jackson Lake:

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    That's a pretty little boat. Howard, do you still have the molds?

  4. #2104
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    "That's a pretty little boat. Howard, do you still have the molds?"

    Thank you, we enjoyed our Frog 21 for over 25 years, including sailing her from Oahu to Molokai, Lanai, and Maui.

    Jackson lake is at the foot of the mountains, during the mornings the valley heats up and the air moves up.
    Then the cold air from the mountain comes roaring down at high velocity.
    The guys that sail there know where this wind shear hits the lake so they go out in the morning and wait for it to hit, set their shoots and plane back to the marina.

    And no I do not have the molds, I gave them to Homer Lighthall when we went to Hawaii, and he passed them on to somebody that wanted to build a boat and we never heard from them again.

    And I do not know how the "cat whisperer" got a picture of my boat (RIBBIT) on Jackson lake, I have never seen it before, and I did not know he had any contacts in Jackson hole
    That is mystery!

  5. #2105
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    48 boats entered in tomorrow's Singlehanded Farallones! That's a good sized ocean fleet. In reviewing the entries and their PHRF ratings, I was struck by one thing: No other rating system could do it as well for as cheap. PHRF gets regularly poo-poohed. For the San Francisco Bay SSS fleet, it's the right system with the right answers.

    Certainly there are boats with strong and weak points, upwind, downwind, light air and heavy. Pro sailors and relative beginners all mixed together.... N.Cal PHRF has got it right, and congrats to them.

    OK, I'd be remiss not offering one suggestion. PHRF should consider a 3 second/mile bonus for any boat wet-sailed. Dry sailed boats, without bottom paint, are just plain faster than their wet-sailed sisters.

    Good sailing to All.

    ~skip

  6. #2106
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    Ohh... the handicaps rules.

    I came into the game with the CCA then the IOR and there have been others, that have come and gone.

    PHRF has managed to continue to be a workable compromise through all the different rule experiments, and continues to this day.

    PHRF is not perfect and is always a source of debate, and complaint, but it is inexpensive and has worked for many participants for decades.

    The fact that suggestions are heard and many times acted upon may be a great contributor to its longevity.

    AND as I was told, as neophyte racer, If I was unhappy with handicap racing I should limit my racing to ONE DESIGN fleets.

  7. #2107
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    180 nautical miles north of Santa Cruz (90 miles north of Pt. Reyes), on a rocky headland, lies Point Cabrillo Lighthouse. This historic lighthouse and adjacent quarters have been lovingly restored, and adjacent land, covered with wildflowers, preserved for posterity.

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    Visiting Pt. Cabrillo seemed reason enough for a second shakedown of our 15' camp trailer RUBY. Especially as Pt. Cabrillo light is one of only three remaining lighthouses in the U.S. with an actively operating Fresnel lens.

    In concert with Sue and Tom from DAZZLER and their VW Westfalia camper, we tacked windy and narrow roads 240 miles north to Mendocino, successfully avoiding the Bay to Breakers Race, which pretty much had the area of San Francisco's Golden Gate Park closed to car traffic.

    The “doghole” of Russian Gulch, two miles north of Mendocino town, was our camping destination. Campsite #30 was the furthest back from the small cove (doghole,) and seemed to receive more sun than sites closer to the beach which were subject to prevailing late afternoon and morning stratus and fog (marine layer.)

    "Doghole" ports, like Russian Gulch, were so named because they were so small and exposed that mariners joked they were "barely large enough for a dog to turn around." Despite their small size, dogholes were economic centers of the north coast due to their location and ability to facilitate loading of redwood lumber aboard coastal schooners.

    Enroute to our pilgrimage to Pt. Cabrillo Lighthouse, we visited Fort Bragg's famous glass beach. It was windy and cold and we quickly repaired to intimate and warmer nearby Noyo Harbor for fish and chips on a sunny deck overlooking Noyo River and its working fishing fleet.

    Noyo is a rough and ready little port. Across from the fish and chips was an amazing Buddha sanctuary, with over a thousand buddhas for sale, including one 20 ton granite specimen that Flippy became enamored with.

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    Nearby we spotted a retro camp trailer that with a little work (!) might be resurrected. Calling Howard Spruit, white courtesy telephone please.

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    At the foot of Pt. Cabrillo light lies a cove where in 1859 the frigate FROLIC was wrecked. There's a story there, as FROLIC was a noted opium runner, and heavily insured. No one remembered FROLIC's demise until a diver found her two cannon in 1960.

    After a visit to the Ford House, the local museum, the next day we fortified ourselves with goodies from the Mendocino Bakery before launching and kayaking on the Big River, just south of town.

    About every Mendocino home in the 19th and early 20th century had a water tower on property. The freshwater aquifer was shallow and easily depleted, and water would often have to be brought in from Fort Bragg. I asked the museum docent how water was pumped up to the many tanks in Mendocino....she directed me to the scale model of early Mendocino town. Sure enough, every house had a water tower, and every water tower had a windmill.

    “Mendocino was a very noisy place back in those pre-electricity days.”

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    Last edited by sleddog; 05-25-2017 at 09:55 PM.

  8. #2108
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    A head's up to all those equipped with AIS Class B transponders: As DAZZLER recently learned when visiting San Francisco Bay VTS (Vessel Traffic Service), VTS is not equipped to receive Class B AIS signals and you are not being seen by VTS, except maybe on their radar....VTS can only receive signals from Class A AIS transponders as used by commercial shipping.

    In addition, commercial shipping and SF Bar Pilots are not receiving Class B AIS transmissions either. Not on their laptops, chart plotters, or AIS equipped radars. The primary reason is that the myriad of Class B AIS signals from recreational boats would be clutter that is overly distracting, a detriment to the safe navigation of the ship rather than a convenience.

    What to make of this for SSS sailors? Importantly, know if your AIS transponder is Class A or Class B. If it is Class B, assume you are not being seen by VTS or on Class A transponders as used by commercial shipping, only by fellow Class B recreational users or online on the Marine Traffic website (http://www.marinetraffic.com/.

    It is our obligation to keep a lookout, and not assume you are being seen electronically by the other guy.
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-26-2017 at 12:26 PM.

  9. #2109
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    It is our obligation to keep a lookout, and not assume you are being seen electronically by the other guy.
    Fair enough. To clarify: a year or so ago when I was sailing back up from Half Moon Bay, it was wicked foggy. The wind had died and then my engine (this was before Dave the magnificent took a shining to it). I called vessel traffic and informed them of my situation (not seeking assistance, not in distress, just out there. Meandering). I was told, "Yes, Ma'am, we see you out there." Does that mean that they can see small vessels if we hail them? That is, they can look 'round if they so choose? Ask Tom. He's probably eating a snow cone on the bench next to you.

    ps Since we are discussing camping locations: Just got back from Big Sur, where the road south ends at the Fernwood campground. The Big Sur River has debris everywhere, most of the State Parks are closed and although Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park is open, only a few trails are open. It's still lovely, of course, but in a limited way. No photos, sorry. I was on the watch for pythons: news on the internet revealed a study that suggests snakes hunt in organized packs.
    Last edited by Philpott; 05-26-2017 at 05:52 PM.

  10. #2110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    No photos, sorry. I was on the watch for pythons: news on the internet revealed a study that suggests snakes hunt in organized packs.
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