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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #4501
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    Quote Originally Posted by Intermission View Post
    Must be the cat Trim.
    Trim was a most wonderful feline specimen of a ship's cat: smart, plucky, fearless, mischievous, courageous and well respected by Matthew Flinders crew, 1801-1803, as they were first to circumnavigate, chart, and name Australia, proving it was a continent and not part of Asia. While Flinders was below in his cabin onboard HMS INVESTIGATOR, composing charts of the Australian coast, his crew looked to Trim for orders. And Trim rarely failed. What a cat! Worth a read...

    But neither Matthew Flinders nor Trim were ever in New Zealand waters...

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    Last edited by sleddog; 09-19-2021 at 08:16 PM.

  2. #4502
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    Quote Originally Posted by WBChristie View Post
    Hawaiian cat meaning catamaran! Of course
    #4
    Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner! Vaka Moanas were large, ocean going catamarans ("cats") Polynesians sailed throughout the Pacific, as far east as Easter Island, and as far north as Hawaii. It was these Polynesian voyagers who discovered and settled most of the islands of the South Pacific, specifically New Zealand around 1300 AD and led to the present day Maori culture. Interestingly, the Hawaiian and Maori languages are very similar linguistically both in alphabet, words, and sentence patterns.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 09-19-2021 at 08:42 PM.

  3. #4503
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    For inquiring minds, here is a little more background on this story. This is from a BBC earth article.
    https://www.bbcearth.com/news/who-re...ed-new-zealand

    According to Māori myth, New Zealand (Aotearoa in the Māori language) was discovered by Kupe, a fisherman and Rangatira (chief) from Hawaiki [The exact location of Hawaiki has been debated by scholars for decades]. Kupe’s fishing grounds were being troubled by an octopus, who kept eating all the bait off of the fisherman’s lines. Deducing that the octopus belonged to another chief, Muturangi, Kupe asked Muturangi to stop his pet from eating their bait. When Muturangi refused, Kupe vowed to kill the beast. He left his homeland and pursed the beast across the Pacific Ocean. During the pursuit he discovered New Zealand, where they landed to re-supply. A great sea battle with the Octopus ensued at the mouth of Te Moana o Raukawa (Cook Strait), where Kupe finally killed Muturangi’s pet.

    Kupe travelled around the North Island naming many of the locations he passed and vowed never to return to the land he discovered. When he returned home, Kupe described New Zealand as a place with no people; “I saw no one; what I did see was a kokako, a tiwaiwaka, and a weka (ie birds), whistling away in the gullies; kokako was ko-ing on the ridges, and tiwaiwaka was flitting about before my face.” This narrative firmly places Kupe as the first person to discover New Zealand.

    The year Kupe arrived in New Zealand is still debated, as is the year the ‘Great Fleet’ of Māori settlers arrived. Stephenson Percy Smith, a 20th century anthropologist, translated a telling of the story recorded by Hoani Te Whatahoro. In this, Kupe’s arrival happens in 750AD and the migratory great fleet arriving in 1300AD.

    As the myth comes from an oral tradition, there are variations on this story between the different Māori Iwi (tribes). For instance, when Kupe first comes across New Zealand, in the Ngāti Kurī telling, he mistakes Houhora mountain for a whale, whereas the Ngāti Kahu state the fishing tide resulted in Kupe landing in the Hokianga Harbour. The variation could be due to the tribes wishing to link themselves to Kupe.

    Last edited by Dazzler; 09-19-2021 at 09:52 PM.
    Tom P.

  4. #4504
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazzler View Post
    For inquiring minds, here is a little more background on this story. This is from a BBC earth article.
    https://www.bbcearth.com/news/who-re...ed-new-zealand

    According to Māori myth, New Zealand (Aotearoa in the Māori language) was discovered by Kupe, a fisherman and Rangatira (chief) from Hawaiki [The exact location of Hawaiki has been debated by scholars for decades]. Kupe’s fishing grounds were being troubled by an octopus, who kept eating all the bait off of the fisherman’s lines. Deducing that the octopus belonged to another chief, Muturangi, Kupe asked Muturangi to stop his pet from eating their bait. When Muturangi refused, Kupe vowed to kill the beast. He left his homeland and pursed the beast across the Pacific Ocean. During the pursuit he discovered New Zealand, where they landed to re-supply. A great sea battle with the Octopus ensued at the mouth of Te Moana o Raukawa (Cook Strait), where Kupe finally killed Muturangi’s pet.

    Kupe travelled around the North Island naming many of the locations he passed and vowed never to return to the land he discovered. When he returned home, Kupe described New Zealand as a place with no people; “I saw no one; what I did see was a kokako, a tiwaiwaka, and a weka (ie birds), whistling away in the gullies; kokako was ko-ing on the ridges, and tiwaiwaka was flitting about before my face.” This narrative firmly places Kupe as the first person to discover New Zealand.

    The year Kupe arrived in New Zealand is still debated, as is the year the ‘Great Fleet’ of Māori settlers arrived. Stephenson Percy Smith, a 20th century anthropologist, translated a telling of the story recorded by Hoani Te Whatahoro. In this, Kupe’s arrival happens in 750AD and the migratory great fleet arriving in 1300AD.

    As the myth comes from an oral tradition, there are variations on this story between the different Māori Iwi (tribes). For instance, when Kupe first comes across New Zealand, in the Ngāti Kurī telling, he mistakes Houhora mountain for a whale, whereas the Ngāti Kahu state the fishing tide resulted in Kupe landing in the Hokianga Harbour. The variation could be due to the tribes wishing to link themselves to Kupe.

    Thanks for that!

  5. #4505
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    Several recent visitors to CBC's guest dock have asked about our monthly welcome posted on the rose arbor over the gangway and who authored it. I will only say CBC Port Captain, Howard Spruit, chooses the greetings and for this one, it was authored by the Dalai Lama.

    Man sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices his money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present. The result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and dies having never really lived."

    Visitors to the guest dock today included Rowena Carlson and Robb Walker aboard their Cal-40 NOZOMI. It was good to see them again, hear about their 17 day passage to Catalina from Hanalei, and their coastal cruising since, which included Morro Bay, Monterey, Moss Landing (Elkhorn Slough), and Santa Cruz before sailing to Half Moon Bay tomorrow.

    Both Robb and Rowena shared their views on the recent SHTP and its associated activities and we had a fun morning of catching up.

    Of interesting discussion was the recent discovery of PERSEPHONE, Cal-40 No. 1, abandoned and located on an empty lot in Richmond. PERSEPHONE, though cosmetically in need of attention and also needing a replacement for her seized gas engine, has no water damage inside and a locker full of North 3DL sails. One of her previous owners was Dennis Conner and he spared no money upgrading the boat, including a modern rudder.

    PERSEPHONE has been temporarily rescued, moved, and is actively for sale. I will only say that this iconic and now historical boat, built by her original owner, George Griffith, was the fastest of all the Cal-40's, being lighter and stiffer. In the right hands PERSEPHONE would be eminently competitive in any race to Hawaii.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 09-24-2021 at 09:56 PM.

  6. #4506
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    Speaking of historical boats, does anyone recognize this boat or who owned it? It's as much a work of art as a technological triumph. What are those flaps?

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  7. #4507
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Speaking of historical boats, does anyone recognize this boat or who owned it? It's as much a work of art as a technological triumph. What are those flaps?

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    Interesting… and it’s named AERO. I know nothing about this boat, but what I think we are looking at on the back is an inverted empennage or tail assembly as on an aircraft. As on an aircraft, there’s a rudder and elevators and in this case the elevators also act as ailerons. Together on an aircraft the rudder, elevator and ailerons control yaw, pitch and roll. It would be interesting to see the other foils. The issue of actively controlling yaw, pitch and roll has been the biggest challenge in the development of foiling sailboats.
    Tom P.

  8. #4508
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    The web sez that's the Aero II, designed by Dr. Manfred Curry. The flaps are brakes, used when racing to slow or stop the boat at opportune times, such as on the starting line. They were quickly outlawed.

    Curry was apparently a bit off - look up Curry Lines or the Curry Grid - but he was pretty good at sailboat racing concepts. One article gives him credit for designing the cam cleat.
    .
    Last edited by BobJ; 09-25-2021 at 10:11 AM.

  9. #4509
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    The web sez that's the Aero II, designed by Dr. Manfred Curry. The flaps are brakes, used when racing to slow or stop the boat at opportune times, such as on the starting line. They were quickly outlawed. One article gives him credit for designing the cam cleat..
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    AERO, Manfred Curry's 20 sq. meter, is 100 years old this year. Curry was the first to experiment with scientific principles and equipment applied to sailing, and wrote the classic and must read Yacht Racing, the Aerodynamics of Sails when he was only 25. It remains in publication.

    Manfred Curry, an American by birth, represented USA in sailing in the 1928 Olympics. Besides sailing brakes, a few of his other "inventions" include the fully battened main, the Park Ave. boom, gybing centerboards, lightweight aluminum fittings, the first cam cleat, and tacking downwind.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 09-25-2021 at 10:48 AM.

  10. #4510
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    Before I saw Chuck's ad for Surprise! I thought my next boat would be a J/109. 109's have wheels and I wanted a tiller. I conjured up a tiller arrangement similar to Aero's that would avoid the need to move the 109's traveler forward, which would have caused a plethora of other issues.
    .
    Last edited by BobJ; 09-25-2021 at 10:51 AM.

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