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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #4221
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    Like many on this Forum, I much enjoy sailing and racing shorthanded, either singlehanded or doublehanded.

    I've raced with big crews, 15-20 on the maxi WINDWARD PASSAGE, 8-16 on MERLIN and Santa Cruz 70's, 6-9 on Santa Cruz 50's, and 4-5 on Moore 24's. Whether day racing, overnight, or across oceans, shorthanded is just more fun, simpler, less crowded, and rewards creativeness, teamwork, anticipation, and trust.

    Yesterday, in consistent, prefrontal, southerly breeze of 10-18 knots, there were 86 DH entries in 10 classes competing in a 14 mile DH race, in the Bay, sponsored by the YRA. For Kim and I on the Wylie-39 CHECKERED PAST, with close competition in our 10 boat class, we had much fun sharing our similar outlooks and 65 years of experience of sailing with and against each other. Kim started CHECKERED PAST, steered the upwind legs (2) and mark roundings (2) while I tended the XL mainsail with its twin topping lifts, choker, vang, Cunningham, and mainsheet. Kim let me drive downwind with GREEN BUFFALO breathing down our necks, two sails against one.

    It was fun watching the BUFFALO crew of Jim Q. and son Stephen pull off multiple 2 pole spinnaker gybes with aplomb just astern.

    Also in the hunt were Cinde Lou, Millie B, and the ship's dog aboard the all electric Alerion Express ANOTHER GIRL. And not far behind were Gordie and Ruth on ARCADIA, and Pat and Michael on the WylieCat 30 NANCY. It was a Time-on-Time Race, not Time on Distance, so consistent good breeze likely favored the faster boats on handicap, both overall and in class.

    All in all, a fun day, even for the RYC neighbors on their J-100 that were never able to properly fly their spinnaker on the 7 mile run from Blossom to "R-14" by the Richmond Bridge center span due to top down spinnaker furler malfunction. I seem to remember similar issues aboard RAGTIME! some years ago. Clearly, there is a learning curve, just as there is for a spinnaker snuffer. When they work, they're great. And when they don't, all hell can break loose.

    Race Results here: https://www.jibeset.net/show.php?RR=...OC=r1&TYP=html
    Last edited by sleddog; 03-15-2021 at 01:42 PM.

  2. #4222
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    A recent mast failure (it stayed upright) on a local Olson-30 featured a below deck horizontal crack beginning at a instrumentation wire hole in the front of the mast the size of a coax connector. The crack almost entirely circled the mast before it was noticed.

    ~ 50% of aluminum mast failures occur in this vicinity: 6" either side of the mast partner at the deck. One culprit is corrosion behind the boom vang plate, where stainless fasteners interact with aluminum sidewall. Another problem area is at the deck collar, where adjustable backstays provide continual working stress, like bending an aluminum can back and forth. Cracks in this area can be hidden by waterproofing attempts and only revealed when the mast is unstepped.

    Holes drilled in an aluminum mast for wiring exits should be on the side, not on the front where stress is concentrated.

    The fix for mast cracks in these areas is to internally sleeve the mast. In fact, sleeving older masts before a crack develops is not out of the question.

  3. #4223
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    493

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    Charge cords really don’t like sea boats. The devices themselves are typically fine, it’s the charging that takes them down. Every charge cord, of every type (USB-A to micro-USB, USB-A to mini-SUB, USB-A to USB-C, USB-C to USB-C, laptop charge bricks) has failed at least once. So the lesson is, hard-wire everything with heat-shrink connectors.
    Corrosion-X is your friend. I hit all my cable ends and ports with it.

  4. #4224
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alameda CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    A recent mast failure (it stayed upright) on a local Olson-30 featured a below deck horizontal crack beginning at a instrumentation wire hole in the front of the mast the size of a coax connector. The crack almost entirely circled the mast before it was noticed.

    ~ 50% of aluminum mast failures occur in this vicinity: 6" either side of the mast partner at the deck. One culprit is corrosion behind the boom vang plate, where stainless fasteners interact with aluminum sidewall. Another problem area is at the deck collar, where adjustable backstays provide continual working stress, like bending an aluminum can back and forth. Cracks in this area can be hidden by waterproofing attempts and only revealed when the mast is unstepped.

    Holes drilled in an aluminum mast for wiring exits should be on the side, not on the front where stress is concentrated.

    The fix for mast cracks in these areas is to internally sleeve the mast. In fact, sleeving older masts before a crack develops is not out of the question.
    Hedgehog's mast an evolved version of the O-30 mast - Internally sleeved from jump, the wire cuts are in the side, and sized to barely accommodate the wire sans connector (ok also the NMEA micro plug). They're also about 4" above the step, just above the internal shoe.
    Doesn't get me out of pulling the gasket more or less annually.

  5. #4225
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    Hedgehog's mast an evolved version of the O-30 mast - Internally sleeved from jump, .
    Where's the "jump.?" Was the internal sleeve originally stock, or a later addition? Is the boom internally sleeved at the vang? Inquiring minds and such. For those unfamiliar, Hedgehog the Sailor, not the boat, has put his masthead in the water during a SHTP. Doggies.
    Last edited by sleddog; 03-17-2021 at 02:24 PM.

  6. #4226
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    Jul 2012
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    The PCExpress underwent mast inspection/repairs in Jan. We found some serious ugly at the mast base and cut an inch and a half off the bottom. It's now supported by a nice block of phenolic. Thank you Pacific Rigging!
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  7. #4227
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Where's the "jump.?" Was the internal sleeve originally stock, or a later addition? Is the boom internally sleeved at the vang? Inquiring minds and such. For those unfamiliar, Hedgehog the Sailor, not the boat, has put his masthead in the water during a SHTP. Doggies.
    yes, the OEM mast for the O-29 from Ballenger is internally sleeved up to 10' above deck. Basically to just below the first spreaders.
    Hedgehog's boom is not the OEM aluminum one, but a carbon section of a Melges 24 mast with custom SS fittings at both ends. The vang attachment point is reinforced, but primarily with external vacuum bagged carbon build up (internal receiver plates. but not sleeving per se).

    Ironically, Dominos mast, which is the one I dipped in 2016, was one of the original single spreader O-30 masts... Proctor made it, it was/is a tree trunk!
    DH

  8. #4228
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    For those unfamiliar, Hedgehog the Sailor, not the boat, has put his masthead in the water during a SHTP. Doggies.
    Ah, yes. Mr Hedgehog. Why, I remember watching his little boatie on the tracker as the fleet crossed the Pacific toward Kauai in 2016.

    "What's this?!" cried the race committee. "A hurricane approaching! Oh, hell! (or something like that) Is it outside assistance if we notify the fleet of its approach?!"

    Dithering ... Angsting ... beating of chests ensued.

    "YES!" Was the consensus. "Or NO!" In any event, the fleet was notified.

    We watched as, one by one the little boaties turned to starboard, away from the dreadful, fearful approach of the hurricane.

    But, wait! What was that lone boatie boat doing!? It was not turning to starboard. It was turning ... uh! uh! THE WRONG WAY! It was turning SOUTH! Right into the path of the big bad hurricane.

    "WTH!!!" *cried the Race Chair. "What is Herrigel doing? Did he not get the memo?!!"

    And the rest, as they say, is part of SSS history. I will leave the conclusion of that particular story to others. It's one of my favorites, and one that causes me to say to E Dock arrivistes: "I know him"


    * WTH = What The Hell, this being a NotAnarchy site

  9. #4229
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    Quote Originally Posted by everydaysailor View Post
    The PCExpress underwent mast inspection/repairs in Jan. We found some serious ugly at the mast base and cut an inch and a half off the bottom. It's now supported by a nice block of phenolic. Thank you Pacific Rigging!
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  10. #4230
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    Can anyone tell what is going on here and why?

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