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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3571
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Santa Cruz CA
    Posts
    30

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    uh oh!
    It sounds like SledDog think he's going to try to get me out of the house after dark.
    He'll have to get a signed note from "control" to make that happen!
    Last edited by Howard Spruit; 12-03-2019 at 10:03 PM. Reason: spelling

  2. #3572
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,033

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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Again this month my 3 required hand flares have expired, as they have every 42 months for 45 years.
    With all this expense, and not wanting to buy yet more hand flares to replace the perfectly good ones with bad dates, I went for an experiment: And purchased a $60, "Coast Guard Compliant" Weems and Plath SOS Light Electronic Flare. "Never expires," "floating and waterproof," "lifetime warranty," "visible up to 10 nautical miles." "Miami International Boat Show Innovation Award Winner," " complies with the Buy American Act."

    Attachment 4926
    Hold your Horses. Apparently West Marine, Amazon, and others are selling the "Electronic Flare, Model C-1001" that I just bought for $60 that is about to be discontinued in 3 weeks. This in 2 e-mails from Sirius, the manufacturer, to DAZZLER:

    PRESS RELEASE
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 10/21/19
    Contact Danielle Doyle
    Danielle@siriussignal.com

    Official Sirius Signal News

    Please note that effective Jan 1, 2020, Sirius Signal will no longer license or manufacture the model C-1001.

    Listed below is the USCG 161.013 Manufacturer Approved Equipment List table showing all current and past manufacturers of the SOS distress light which is approved for carriage. Furthermore, Pursuant to 46 CFR 161-013-17 Sirius Signal has complied with its required notification submittal of Model C-1003 (see below).

    161.013-17 Manufacturer notification
    Each manufacturer certifying lights in accordance with the specifications of this subpart must send written notice to the Commandant (CG-ENG), Attn: Office of Design and Engineering Systems, U.S. Coast Guard Stop 7509, 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20593-7509 within 30 days after first certifying them, and send a new notice every five years thereafter as long as it certifies lights.

    Sirius Signal Notification Submittal of Model C-1003
    Oct 17, 2019
    TO: Chief, Lifesaving & Fire Safety Division
    US Coast Guard Headquarters
    Commandant (CG-ENG-4)
    US Coast Guard Stop 7509
    2703 Martin Luther King Junior AVE. SE.
    Washington, DC 20593-7509

    Pursuant to 161.013-17 manufacture notification. Sirius Signal LLC San Diego, California certifies Model SOS C-1003 ALL WHITE SOS to all applicable subparts for 161.013 “Electric Distress Light for Boats.

    Furthermore, as per 161.013-11 “Prototype Test” the Sirius Signal Model SOS C-1003 ALL WHITE SOS “Electric Distress Light for Boats” meets or exceeds all performance requirements as per CFR 46 161013

    The Sirius Signal Model SOS C-1001 will no longer be manufactured effective January 1, 2020. Please update the “Manufacturer Approved Equipment List” to reflect these changes.

    Respectively yours,
    Anthony Covelli
    CEO
    Sirius Signal LLC


    Replacement Model C-1003 will be available as a direct replacement for the light you currently carry. A copy of the formal Sirius Signal C-1003 "Letter of Notification" is included in this email. The included table of the "Manufacturer Approved Equipment List" will automatically update each month. Model C-1003 will be added Those dealers who are listed as "Sirius Signal additional insured" may receive updated certificates indicating the addition of Model C-1003.

    C-1001 warranties remain intact and, service parts will be available

    San Diego-based Sirius Signal produces USCG-approved distress devices with a focus on safety, technology, effectiveness, and sustainability. To learn more about purchasing Sirius Signal devices or to request more information about our products, visit us at https://siriussignal.com or call 888.526.0005. More information about this release? Contact Danielle@siriussignal.com.


    I do not know the difference in the old model C-1001 still being sold, and the new model C-1003 that has been introduced "in time for the Holidays" except the new C-1003 may float higher, and have a "marine whistle" included as a required sound signal.
    Last edited by sleddog; 12-04-2019 at 12:00 PM.

  3. #3573
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,033

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    Thanks to Jackie for alerting me to this article about the newer models of electronic flares becoming available. A flare with bluetooth and lithium batteries? Certain to lighten your wallet.

    https://www.panbo.com/sirius-signal-...stress-lights/

  4. #3574
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Saratoga
    Posts
    117

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    Should we then assume that Orion and Weems & Plath will follow suit? A nautical signalling arms race?
    I wish my W&P had a good upper D ring, so that if the boat isn't sinking out from under me, it could be hoisted on a halyard a few feet.
    Cord and some friction knots will save me.

  5. #3575
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
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    Joe from Sirius returned my call this evening. Sirius makes the Weems and Plath Electronic Flares under discussion.

    Joe reported the soon to be discontinued model C-1001 ($60) and the soon to be released new model C-1003 ($90) "have the same optics and will always be Coast Guard acceptable."

    The difference is the new C-1003 model will be marketed "as a kit complete with batteries, a signalling whistle, has a slightly different float collar that is brighter orange, and the white LED is slightly brighter."

    "Customers like to think they are buying something new and improved."
    Last edited by sleddog; 12-04-2019 at 11:17 PM.

  6. #3576
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Bodfish, CA
    Posts
    104

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    To put a stop to the incessant flare purchases, the Weems and Plath version of electronic flare was ordered today.

    My fading memory seemed to recall the use of an electronic flare during the recent LongPac. Without going back to the source, my foggy memory seems to recall the electronic flare (?) gave better position information to the Coast Guard. Was this due to a better visual image or should I trade in my memory?

    Ants

  7. #3577
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Saratoga
    Posts
    117

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    The source was the Hinkley in the Long Pac with rudder issues, but it was an AIS beacon, instead of a strobe that runs two days plus.

  8. #3578
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Bodfish, CA
    Posts
    104

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    Thanks! I checked out of sailing for a while after Hurricane Julliette in La Paz back in 2002 (or so). The re-entry is underway with a Moore 24. The changes in electronics, sail materials, and running rigging is just amazing. Thankfully, no fun at the tiller has been lost.

  9. #3579
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alameda CA
    Posts
    343

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    Quote Originally Posted by AntsUiga View Post
    T
    My fading memory seemed to recall the use of an electronic flare during the recent LongPac. Without going back to the source, my foggy memory seems to recall the electronic flare (?) gave better position information to the Coast Guard. Was this due to a better visual image or should I trade in my memory?

    Ants
    Quote Originally Posted by Intermission View Post
    The source was the Hinkley in the Long Pac with rudder issues, but it was an AIS beacon, instead of a strobe that runs two days plus.
    You're memories are intact.
    From my memory of Jackie's video the actual device the good doctor used to vector in the CG was a radar-SART beacon... Slightly different from AIS SART beacon.
    Here's the thread:
    https://www.sfbaysss.org/forum/showt...ened-out-there

    DH

  10. #3580
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
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    2,033

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    Quote Originally Posted by WBChristie View Post
    In the end it wasn’t as bad as predicted. The biggest gust I saw was about 55k ... sustained winds in the low 40s. Fairly common conditions in the winter here. We’re grateful it wasn’t worse.
    The "bomb cyclone" that hit N.Cal/Southern Oregon last week created some of the highest waves ever recorded off the California coast.

    A 75-footer was recorded 20 miles off Cape Mendocino in northern California, according to the University of California San Diego's Coastal Data Information Program. (CDIP)

    In the 15 years the CDIP program has had a buoy at that location, significant wave height typically doesn't exceed 10 feet.

    The 75-footer was the highest of the waves recorded in that period, which averaged around 43 feet. "Definitely unusual" for this time of year said program manager James Behrens.

    "These kinds of really large waves are usually only detected way out in the middle of the ocean, when winds are being generated," he said.

    The program's buoys have only measured taller waves at one other station, located in the remote North Pacific where extreme waves are expected to form on occasion.", he said.

    Troy Nicolini, meteorologist in charge at NOAA's National Weather Service, explained that the bomb cyclone brought a "dynamic fetch," an event when strong winds move at the same direction and speed as the waves it's generating.

    The Thanksgiving "bomb cyclone" caused hurricane-strength winds nearby.

    On November 26, the same day the 75-foot wave was recorded, gusts at Cape Blanco, 50 nm miles north of Brookings, were recorded reaching 92 knots.

    The CDIP studies how waves impact the coast. The program's buoys are small, only three feet in circumference, but they're designed to "measure waves to the highest precision." Behrens said the oceanographers share the data with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to improve their measurements.

    The wave buoys are fitted with acceleration sensors that help oceanographers recreate the motion of the wave, its height and direction. They can sense how long a wave takes to move and locate the direction of wind chop and sea swells, he said.

    Name:  CDIP Buoy.jpg
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    "Our mandate is to understand how the coast is being impacted by waves, and so we're really there to make sure we're catching these extreme events."

    Of course it depends how a wave height is measured, but I've likely never seen a 75 foot wave offshore. During the '79 Fastnet "Force 10" storm on IMP there was, at one point, another boat, a 43 footer with a 60 foot mast, abeam and one wave away (about 200 yards.) When both boats were in the trough, on opposite sides of the wave, I couldn't see the mast head of the other boat.
    Last edited by sleddog; 12-06-2019 at 04:57 PM.

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