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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3281
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    When my mother graduated from Oakland High my grandparents gave her a cruise to Honolulu. It was aboard the Lurline. Mom kept one of the menus, which I have stored away somewhere.

    If I haven't mentioned it before, the Matthew Turner shipyard was here in Benicia. Some evidence is still visible.

  2. #3282
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    When my mother graduated from Oakland High my grandparents gave her a cruise to Honolulu. It was aboard the Lurline. Mom kept one of the menus, which I have stored away somewhere.
    If I haven't mentioned it before, the Matthew Turner shipyard was here in Benicia. Some evidence is still visible.
    Matthew Turner designed and built the 83' (LOD) schooner LURLINE. Whether she was built and launched at Turner's yard at Hunters Point, SF., or at foot of W 12th St off of W K St, in Benicia is uncertain. Turner moved his boat building operation to Benecia in 1883, the same year LURLINE, owned by the Spreckels Bros., was launched.

    Thanks to CHAUTAUQUA, Capitola Boat Club is blessed to have a fine print of LURLINE racing her first race in June of 1883 from Fort Point, San Francisco, to Santa Cruz. Here she is just west of the Cliff House in classic wind against tide conditions, which had several members of her professional crew seasick.

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    This particular LURLINE was never owned by Matson. In 1906, her owner was H.H. Sinclair of the South Coast Yacht Club in San Pedro. SCYC was to become the LAYC.

    LURLINE raced 3 Transpacs, 1906, 1908, and 1912. In 1906, as Diamond Head began to take on its familiar rose and purple colors from the setting sun, LURLINE boomed across the finish line with everything drawing at 7:30 p.m. in the remarkable performance of 12 days, 10 hours, with a second day's 24 hour run of 265 miles.
    Her course record stood until 1923 when the Burgess designed, 107 foot Gloucester schooner MARINER knocked 19 hours off LURLINE's time.

    As LURLINE finished that first "Transpac," the entire sleepy town of Honolulu had been alerted to LURLINE's impending finish as the Diamond Head finish line committee had blown the Diamond Head Lighthouse horn 4 times, then 4 times more, followed by 2 long blasts, the signal that LURLINE had been sighted on her approach down the Molokai Channel. The cliffs were lined with spectators and well wishers, a tradition that lasted until the 1970's when Honolulu transitioned from town to city, to metropolis.

    Interesting for us modern day racers to Hawaii, the revolutionary idea of a handicap rule in an ocean race was used for the first time in that very same 1906 Transpac. The rating formula was simple: 30 minutes allotted handicap for each foot of length difference from the scratch boat, length being determined by LWL (Length on the Waterline) plus one-half the total overhang.
    Last edited by sleddog; 06-15-2019 at 07:27 AM.

  3. #3283
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Sad news last evening from Nance and Commodore Tompkins. WANDER BIRD, aka ELBE No.5, a 136 year old, historical National Treasure to Germany and to the World, was rammed abeam the foremast and sunk by Cypriot flagged containership ASTROSPRINTER in narrow confines of the Elbe River, 18 miles downstream from Hamburg.
    The 'BIRD would not have been “nimble”, but it appears a prudent master would have maneuvered to keep WANDER BIRD out of the way of the overtaking and oncoming ship.WANDER BIRD is the brown track on the below AIS chart, and ASTROSPRINTER the green.

    Attachment 4436
    Disregard the AIS chart above. And my speculation that based on the (erroneous) AIS, WANDER BIRD was being overtaken.

    A short video clip taken aboard WANDER BIRD beginning 45 seconds before the collision shows WANDER BIRD on starboard tack, sailing upriver at about 5 knots, when 5 quick toots of WANDER BIRD's electric horn are given twice. Too late, there is a command to "bear off," then another "hard-to-port." It appears "hard to port" is misunderstood, and the steering assistants push the tiller to port, beginning to turn WANDER BIRD laboriously to starboard and into the path of the ship.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXrTvVh4NOs

    This is an unofficial transcription of the video clip. Who is talking and where they are located onboard is not clear:

    Male voice : What is he up to (Was hat der denn da vor).
    - Most probably this person goes midships and presses the electric whistle two times 5.

    Male voice: Why is he doing that (Was das nun soll?) - referring to the cargo vessel

    Male voice: Bear off ( Abfallen!)

    Other male voice: we are going to hit him (Den Treffen wir).

    Male voice: Hard to Port (Hart Backbord).

    - tiller is pushed to the port side, making the vessel turn to starboard: "Hard to Port" IMO means turn the ship to port. But that could be misinterpreted during the panic to mean push the tiller to port.
    Last edited by sleddog; 06-16-2019 at 09:49 AM.

  4. #3284
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    Today during race 4 for the Sir Thomas Lipton Challenge Trophy, Sequoia Yacht Club stuck their J/22's mast into the bottom of the Berkeley Circle. Instead of getting Lipton tea, they got Sanka...

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  5. #3285
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    Ruh-roh. Yesterday, while watching the dinghy sailors from Santa Rosa Sailing Club set up for our Estuary sail, one of them had a small plastic bottle attached to the top of his mast to prevent a sticking when things go sideways. I guess that's not a very race worthy accoutrement but certainly sounds like a great idea for small boats and shallow waters!
    Last edited by Gamayun; 06-16-2019 at 11:04 AM.

  6. #3286
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    Today during race 4 for the Sir Thomas Lipton Challenge Trophy, Sequoia Yacht Club stuck their J/22's mast into the bottom of the Berkeley Circle. Instead of getting Lipton tea, they got Sanka...
    Sorry to see mud on the masthead of the J-22! That's a good reminder a 700 lb. lead keel may not keep a boat from turtle-ing. I'm curious if the water-tight bulkheads floated the boat, or if airbags were needed. Is a re-evaluation of the J-22's buoyancy in order?

    Does anyone know if that blue 50 footer in the J-22 photo background is the globe-girdling and historical Hal Roth AMERICAN FLAG, aka SEBAGO? If so, the customized Santa Cruz 50 AMERICAN FLAG was also F2F the 2000 SHTP as SUNDOWNER, a little singlehanded history right there at Richmond Brickyard Cove.

  7. #3287
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    The RC wisely chose to move the race course to the more protected area off Keller Beach. The sinking incident happened on the way back inside Ferry Point. Parker Diving used two lift bags to raise the boat to the attitude in Bob’s photo. One of the bags was connected to the single point lifting eye on top of the keel. The RYC hoist was then used to raise the boat just enough that a high capacity pump could be used for dewatering. There are lots of pictures of the entire incident.

    The SC50 in the background is ADRENALINE, built to the SC50 design in South Africa. Not the same boat as questioned.

  8. #3288
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    Does anyone know if that blue 50 footer in the J-22 photo background is the globe-girdling and historical Hal Roth AMERICAN FLAG, aka SEBAGO?
    It is not:

    She was built in South Africa by Eric Bongers under the name Nina. In 2001, she made her way to Southern California and, for years, raced the SoCal/Mexico/Hawaii circuits. Her new owners (Del Olsen, Gail Yando, Greg Mitchell & Byung Choung, Gerry Lampert, Kirk and Lisa Twardowski, and Andy & Maureen Bates) for the most part, are International-14/Canoe junkies, who decided to join forces and buy this ocean racing machine.

    According to legend, the idea was hatched by “the Godfather” Del Olson. He was lurking on YachtWorld.com for some local big ocean racing boats and threw out the idea to his brus (mates) to trade in their trapezes for something a little bigger. Shortly thereafter, they found Adrenaline and brought her from Long Beach to her new home at Richmond Yacht Club.

    Their plan is to race Adrenaline in the local winter racing scene, spring OYRA, 2015 Transpac, 2016 Pacific Cup, and beyond. Their Hawaiian campaign will be a success if they hoist the second round of mai tais to “the next time.”

    buzzen.jpg

    As a transpacific racer on both the first and last SC50s ever built, I have to say that Adrenaline looks like one sweet ride. The topsides are designed for full-on wave surfing while below deck provides quite a luxurious set up. Some modifications include an open transom, new rudder, taller rig, and a bulbed keel.

    Other deets:

    40 hp Volvo Penta
    8’ draft
    B&G 20/20 instruments
    hydraulic backstay and vang
    removable dodger
    carbon spinnaker and jockey (whisker) poles
    suit of sails including a 3DL main, an impressive assortment of headsails, asym kites
    down below: oven, reefer, freezer, forward head (with a door!), nav station, dining table to starboard, ample storage, flush cabin sole, opening port lights, posh v-berth and aft quarter berths (oooh, mattresses!) with no spider hole berths as exhibited in early SC50 models, and forward sail locker.

  9. #3289
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    In the 1981 Transpac aboard the Santa Cruz 50 OAXACA we had a MOB incident. In an early evening, post-squall environment, with a crew of 7, we were changing up to a lighter spinnaker in 15-17 knots of wind. It was a bald headed change, and the foredeck hand stood on the rain wetted bow pulpit to trip away the old spinnaker and slipped off. By the time he surfaced to leeward and abeam the helm, Capt. Bob had spun OAXACA into the wind and the spinnaker halyard was run, dropping the spinnaker back and down against the headstay. The MOB was not more than a length away, was quickly retrieved, and a spinnaker reset. Time of MOB: 1 minute.

    Two weeks ago, another MOB incident happened onboard OAXACA in the Coastal Race from Monterey to Santa Barbara. This one at night, in 30 knots of wind, with the boat broaching temporarily out of control. This was a very different scenario from our 1981 MOB.

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    There are two dispassionate and well written descriptions of the recent MOB on OAXACA. One written by the owner/skipper, and one by the MOB, a professional sailor with 2x singlehanded RTW experience. If you haven't read both, they are here: https://cruisingclub.org/news/man-overboard.

    ULDB's, when they do a dipsey doodle, have a very quick motion. Vertical to horizontal can happen in a second. A Santa Cruz 50 and a Cal-40 weigh the same. Both are the sweetest rides to Hawaii one could hope for. MOB's happen when least expecting. I could name 25 reasons for real event MOB's, and I'm sure others could too. Harness and tethers are not always a panacea unless they have been shortened enough to prevent going over the lifelines in the first place. Clipping a 6' tether onto stretchy wet jacklines is one example of wishful thinking you're acting safely. But you're not. SSS has lost at least 2 members clipped onto jacklines, with several other close calls.
    Last edited by sleddog; 06-16-2019 at 12:33 PM.

  10. #3290
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    Growing up around S.Cal harbors' at an impressionable age left a memorable imprint of sights, sounds, and smells, some long gone. It seems like yesterday sailing my 10 foot dinghy, smelling pine tar, creosote, paint and varnish, especially along "schooner row, just off the Coast Highway.

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    Red lead was the choice for bottom and bilge paint. You could smell the boatyard a mile away.

    The Balboa Ferry would give its first long toot of the day at first light. I couldn't wait to get on the dock to watch the sea horses ascending and descending, the sight of porpoise jumping in twists and turns. And to sail my hand carved balsa wood schooner with 15 miniature sails cut from old rags of a bed sheet, using thread and string for sheets and a lead fishing sinker pounded flat for a keel.

    http://www.talesofbalboa.com/

    Thursdays and Fridays were big money earning days. I'd learned to climb at an early age, and would get paid a quarter to hand-over-hand aloft on client's race boats, wiping the port shrouds on the way up, and starboard side on the way down, so new white dacron sails by Watts or Baxter and Cicero wouldn't have brown rigging stains from a week's worth of air pollution.

    20 miles west, past the Navy town of Long Beach, was Fish Harbor. On the west side of Fish Harbor was the Terminal Island Federal Prison where you could hear the loud speaker and cheering from weekend baseball games. Star-Kist Tuna had the world's largest cannery next door to the yacht mooring field, and the putrid stench of floating fish offal belied the fact that "Chicken of the Sea" revolutionized seafood consumption through introduction of canned tuna.

    We couldn't get to sea fast enough, out past Angel's Gate Lighthouse, with its Fresnel lens and deep throated "Moaning Maggie" horn, and past lighthouse tender and family's laundry flapping on clothes lines in the fresh westerly afternoon seabreeze of Hurricane Gulch, as shipping belched black smoke from rusty funnels just to leeward as they passed through the fleet of grey navy warships.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 06-19-2019 at 03:07 PM.

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