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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #2731
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    OMG That is a lovely item, is it not? Nothing in a Cartier window is as beautifully made or displayed.
    Jacqueline, qui est Cartier?

    I used to sail with IOR yacht designer Dick Carter on his RED ROOSTER. But Dick was a Yankee from Nahant, 15 miles north of Boston, and the windows in his design office were for telescopes in a six story cement tower.

    No, that's not it. You must mean Jacques Cartier, the famed Breton sailor, explorer, and cartographer who made 3 voyages (1534, 1535-36, 1541-42) to the Newe World, and named and claimed Canada for the French, thinking he had reached China?

    FYI: I believe Dick Carter is coming out with his autobiography in the near future. One of our Forum's correspondents, red roo, helped edit Dick Carter's story and restore historical photos.

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    As for Carter's windows, his yacht design office in the six story tower in Nahant was once used for WWII Boston Harbor defenses and as a spotting tower for testing the new fangled radar being fine tuned by Raytheon in the main house adjoining the Tower.

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    Nearby to the "Tower" was a gun battery at Nahant's East Point. The gun battery was only test fired once, as its concussions broke many windows of local Nahant residences.
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-16-2018 at 02:44 PM.

  2. #2732
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Jacqueline, qui est Cartier?
    Yes, of course that Carter. Thank you for catching my misspelling, Clever Boy.

  3. #2733
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    If we didn't know better, we would be hard pressed to guess this smiling group of sailors just soloed from San Francisco to Kauai in the 2018 Singlehanded Transpacific Race.

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    Thanks to Patty Meanley for sharing this photo which lets us put faces with boat names. L to R:
    Bill Meanley (DOLFIN); John Woodworth (OWL); Mike Cunningham (kneeling) (JACQUELINE); David Clark (PASSAGES); Carlianne Johnson (kneeling) KYNNTANA; Lee Johnson (MORNING STAR); Chris Case (FUGU); Philippe Jamotte (DOUBLE EXPRESSO); Don Martin (CRINAN II); John Simpson (CRAZY RHYTHM); Greg Ashby (NIGHTMARE); Charley Casey (RIFF RIDER); John Colby (IRIS); Tom Boussie (JOUJOU); Shad Lemke (DARK HORSE); Not Pictured - Cliff Shaw RAINBOW.

    The beautiful and historic trophies are front and center. We are so fortunate to have them as their plaques have special names, dates, and history. At one point this year our hard working Commodore David fended off a legal "cease and desist" challenge to the Singlehanded Transpac from another race that wanted the trophy plaques and bronze belt buckles sent to them to be melted down. Congratulations, David Herrigel, from all of us for all you have given to sailors of the SSS and SHTP.
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-19-2018 at 12:05 PM.

  4. #2734
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    Jan 2015
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    San Francisco Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog
    ...At one point this year our hard working Commodore David fended off a legal "cease and desist" challenge to the Singlehanded Transpac from another race that wanted the trophy plaques and bronze belt buckles sent to them to be melted down. Congratulations, David Herrigel, from all of us for all you have given to sailors of the SSS and SHTP.
    Brings to mind: "... pry them from my cold, dead fingers."

  5. #2735
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    We don't need no stinkin' GPS. What looks below like a patch of unmown clover in the yard at Capitola Boat Club is actually a hotbed of celestial navigation.

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    Though not visible in the photo, CBC's clover patch is filled with bees, as many as 35-50 on a sunny morning. Not a place to step barefoot!

    As was first proven 80 odd years ago using painted bees, bees navigate with 5 eyes (2 big, 3 small) that compute the bearing of the sun. When a foraging bee returns to the hive, she performs a figure eight "waggle dance" consisting of a short run ending in opposing half circles that returns her to the beginning point of her run. The direction of her run, the "waggle," indicates the bearing of the food source with respect to the sun.

    An observing sister bee remembers the angle between the sun. When she flies out of the hive, the sister bee takes a quick sun sight using her polarized sensitive eyes that allow navigation even on cloudy days, and buzzes away on a "beeline," at the same angle as her mates waggle dance. In addition, the longer the waggle, the further the food source. 1 sec of waggle equals approximately 1 km of distance.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7ijI-g4jHg

    Next time you are enjoying a p-nut butter, sliced banana, and honey sandwich in the cockpit, you can thank a bee's ability to celestial navigate.
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-23-2018 at 05:01 PM.

  6. #2736
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    Dec 2008
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    Clover rules. No boring grass lawns. We need flowering plants everywhere!

  7. #2737
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatzman View Post
    Clover rules. No boring grass lawns. We need flowering plants everywhere!
    Right On.

    Scotsman William Fife was one of the most famous yacht designers and builders of the late 19th and 20th centuries. His designs, more than 600, were built in Fairlie, Scotland, and were known for their beauty, speed, and unmatched construction. Included in Fife's portfolio were two SHAMROCK's for tea magnate Sir Thomas Lipton's America's Cup challenges.

    When you see a Fife design, you are seeing a masterpiece. They are unmistakable.

    So I'm walking the waterfront, and there was a most lovely 70 foot cutter named CLOVER. I was sure it was a Fife and struck up conversation with CLOVER's captain, commenting on the beautiful name. He confirmed Wm. Fife as the designer/builder and told a fun story of the origin of the name.

    It seems the wealthy English owner was not well liked in the Fife shipyard where CLOVER was built. When it came time for the yacht's name to be carved in her beautiful wood transom and embossed with gold leaf, the shipyard workers rebelled when the owner's chosen name "C-Lover" was revealed.

    With Fife's approving wink of an eye, the name carver "accidentally " misread the work order and forgot the hyphen as he carved into the solid oak transom. The owner and his consort appeared several days later for the launching, and as the champagne bottle broke on the bow, CLOVER she became.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHHbYf5ZVCw
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-25-2018 at 08:46 PM.

  8. #2738
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    Good friends were recently close-hauled sailing their S&S 34 MOLLY B off Santa Cruz in afternoon westerly of 20 knots when the upper shroud parted and the mast broke. Fortunately, no one hurt, and after retrieving rigging and sails, they were able to motor home with the bottom section of the mast still vertical, but bent double.

    MOLLY B, #3 of the SPIRIT class, was built by Hank Easom and Derek Baylis in 1970-71. MOLLY B, with her narrow beam and long waterline, was at one time one of the stoutest and fastest small boats sailing SF Bay, and provided a great training platform for the Baylis kids, Trevor, Will, and Liz. Derek Baylis was a fine engineer (Barient winches, Monterey Bay Aquarium) and seaman, and MOLLY B's Famet aluminum mast had oversize standing rigging.

    But salt water, metal fatigue, electrolysis, even a possible lightning strike, eventually do in the stoutest of rigs. When MOLLY B's broken mast was removed by crane, all sorts of issues were discovered. Hidden holes and cracks in the mast at the deck partners, swages with cracks, and a fork swage fitting that had completely failed.

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    47 years old, MOLLY B's mast and rigging had exceeded it's lifespan. The owners had liability, but no hull or rigging insurance. Their current thinking is what they saved in insurance over 35 years will be able to buy a new rig....

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~/)~~~~~~~~~/\^^~~~~~~~

    Tomorrow will be a survey and sea trial of an immaculately and meticulously maintained 38 footer here at Santa Cruz Harbor. Despite the boat's pedigree and maintenance, the owners were vexed by a continual engine vibration. Alignment, engine mounts, and various manner of expensive remedies were attempted.

    Who would have guessed a worn and asymmetrical zinc anode mounted mid-shaft can create unbalance in a propeller shaft? Lesson learned for those with propeller shafts: make sure the boatyard, or person responsible, mounts the new prop shaft zinc 1-3" in front of the Cutless bearing of the strut rather than mid-shaft.
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-31-2018 at 05:57 PM.

  9. #2739
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    Mar 2018
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    Santa Cruz CA
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    31

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    I read the words "lightning Strike" relative to Molly B's mast.
    Those words lead me to believe the mystery is solved:>}

  10. #2740
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Spruit View Post
    I read the words "lightning Strike" relative to Molly B's mast.
    Those words lead me to believe the mystery is solved:>}
    There is no record of a lightning strike on MOLLY B during her life span that I'm aware of. I was speaking in general terms about lightning strikes on masts, as I have seen stainless rigging components compromised by lightning, not noticed until months later. The reason MOLLY B's upper shroud fork terminal failed looks like a combination of age, corrosion, and likely stress fatigue, as that original fork was attached to a tang at the spreader tip (i.e "discontinuous" upper shroud.)

    I don't care how taut the rigging is on any boat, lee side standing rigging is going to sway as the vessel sails over waves, eventually creating fatigue somewhere near the terminals/tangs whether using wire rope or rod.

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