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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3191
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Lee's photos of GANNET beg some questions. Maybe Webb Chiles will stop by the Forum and give us some first person explanations...
    [How was the sheet to tiller self steering arranged and in what windspeed and sail angle did it work best/worst? From reading Webb's blog, it sounded like there was shock cord pulling to leeward from the tiller. And somehow the jibsheet crossed the cockpit to the weather side, and then to the tiller. I only see one cam cleat on the tiller...
    GANNET's sheet to tiller steering can be seen in action here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qx4f36BoYfk
    Basic, but apparently effective in certain conditions: shock cord pulling the tiller to leeward, balanced by the leeward jibsheet crossing the cockpit to the windward rail, then attached to the tiller. If it worked for him, it might work for you, although bigger jibs would be hard to handle without a winch between.

  2. #3192
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    GANNET's sheet to tiller steering can be seen in action here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qx4f36BoYfk
    Basic, but apparently effective in certain conditions: shock cord pulling the tiller to leeward, balanced by the leeward jibsheet crossing the cockpit to the windward rail, then attached to the tiller. If it worked for him, it might work for you, although bigger jibs would be hard to handle without a winch between.
    Well, it used to work on Dura Mater the Cal 20.

  3. #3193
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    With the breeze registering SSE, 27, gusting 35 knots at Monterey Bay Buoy much of the afternoon, and gale warnings for the vicinity, Soquel Cove off Capitola is a lee shore. Nevertheless, 5 boats were still moored to buoys at the Capitola "Marina." What were they thinking?

    About 6pm Capt. Bob called from his home at Haleiwa, Hawaii, with not unexpected news. "Hey Skip, I'm looking at the Capitola Surf webcam. There's a boat ashore."

    I suited up and walked downhill two blocks. Sure enough, there was a Cal-27 just feet from the Esplanade seawall. With the keel in the sand, it was heeled over 40 degrees and making heavy weather of its seemingly hopeless position.

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    The owner was walking around in a daze, apparently having been told by Vessel Assist there was no chance they could or would help. More interesting was a wetsuit clad guy in the surf, pulling on a halyard, shouting "I can salvage this, I can salvage this." Even more bizarre were a dozen spectators recruited by the erstwhile salvager tugging on a long nylon line run through the bow pulpit and attached to a cabin top winch of the Cal.

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    I walked further out the Esplanade and could see a telltale frayed and broken mooring line hanging from the opposite side bow cleat. I observed the pulling party on the beach were attempting to pull the boat towards the groin rocks, an even more precarious position.

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    The tide was rising, and the boat had only inches to go before its outboard, rudder, or transom contacted the seawall and plastic started splintering. A cop with a roll of yellow ribbon in hand shooed me away. It was getting dark and raining. I felt sorry for the boat. Cal 27's are tough little ships. Any modern ocean racer would have likely lost its keel or rudder by now.. What will be left after tonight's "winter storm" and frontal passage impact the Coast?
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-15-2019 at 08:57 PM.

  4. #3194
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    Aaauuuuggghhhh!!! Poor boat! She and Dura Mater (hull 616) may have shared the same production fellas back in the day! Those are terrible photos. WHAT was that sailor thinking, to put his vessel in harm’s way?

  5. #3195
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    Aaauuuuggghhhh!!! Poor boat! She and Dura Mater (hull 616) may have shared the same production fellas back in the day! Those are terrible photos. WHAT was that sailor thinking, to put his vessel in harm’s way?
    He wasn't thinking when you double a line through a mooring buoy eye and the winds and seas rise, there's gonna be chafe where the rope turns sharply around the metal of the eye....

  6. #3196
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    Andre' the Anna's hummingbird, Port Captain of the Capitola Boat Club (CBC), had a bird's eye view from his cliff side perch last night to what was happening 80 feet below. Wearing his special ordered, mini-sized hummingbird night vision goggles, Andre' watched as the beached Cal-27 was pulverised by surf, until by sunrise little identifiable remained. The remains of the keel was disappearing under the sand. A halyard led to part of the broken mast. There was a small piece of hull. The remaining bits and pieces of the brave but desperate little ship had disappeared, or become part of a debris field down the cliff base.

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    Not wanting to miss out on the action, a Grand Banks 32 knockoff, DELFIN, also broke it's mooring line sometime during the stormy night and came ashore about 50 yards west of the rapidly disappearing Cal. The motor yacht beached broadside to the surf, and rapidly filled with a mixture of water and sand.

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    Where is the FOUNDATION JOSEPHINE and her indomitable crew when needed? "No cure, no pay," was their motto as readers tracked their intrepid exploits through the pages of Farley Mowat's classic The Serpent's Coil.

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    Instead, Towboat U.S. is charging somebody's insurance $10K to attempt to pull the wayward powerboat off the Capitola beach at high tide. Andre' is just shaking his ruby iridescent head feathers in wonder....
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-16-2019 at 09:49 AM.

  7. #3197
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    He wasn't thinking when you double a line through a mooring buoy eye and the winds and seas rise, there's gonna be chafe where the rope turns sharply around the metal of the eye....
    This seems like a teachable moment...

    If there were five boats on moorings, and two came ashore, what was the difference with the three that didn't come ashore?
    Many boaters in the San Juans, tie a second painter slightly looser than the first as a "second chance", on single moorings.
    Thirty plus years ago, when there was more surge at SF Marina, the hot setup was a short chain through the cleat, attached to a thimble, with a heavy rubber snubber next.
    I've yet to experience any chafe when doubled bow and stern at Ayala Cove; but then again, I've never sat out a storm there either.
    Skip, if a bow painter had a whole round turn on the mooring eye, would it take twice as long to chafe through?

  8. #3198
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    Quote Originally Posted by Intermission View Post
    This seems like a teachable moment...
    If there were five boats on moorings, and two came ashore, what was the difference with the three that didn't come ashore?Many boaters in the San Juans, tie a second painter slightly looser than the first as a "second chance", on single moorings.Thirty plus years ago, when there was more surge at SF Marina, the hot setup was a short chain through the cleat, attached to a thimble, with a heavy rubber snubber next.
    I've yet to experience any chafe when doubled bow and stern at Ayala Cove; but then again, I've never sat out a storm there either.
    Skip, if a bow painter had a whole round turn on the mooring eye, would it take twice as long to chafe through?
    My understanding is the Capitola Wharf will rent you a mooring (ball, chain, and cement anchor block.) Unlike at Catalina, it is up to you to secure your boat to the mooring ball. How this is done varies. Unless you are just there for an afternoon, and remain aboard, a secondary (backup) mooring line would be in order.

    Yes, a whole round turn on the mooring eye would postpone chafe. One thing that accelerates chafe is bringing both ends of the mooring line back to the bow of the boat. This sets up a sawing motion. What is the best way to secure a mooring line to an eye on a mooring buoy? I'm open to suggestions. Until something better is proposed, I myself would use two round turns on the mooring eye, then a long bowline, reachable from the deck.

    If the mooring were going to be long term, I would have two separate heavy duty mooring lines, one slightly longer. Each would be eye-spliced around a thimble, and the thimble/eye splice would be both attached to the mooring eye with a moused heavy duty shackle and screw pin.

    At the deck, there would be chafing gear where the mooring lines passed through the bow chocks or over a bow roller.
    The bow roller would also have a security pin to keep the mooring line from jumping off the roller.
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-16-2019 at 11:17 AM.

  9. #3199
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    Growing up on a farm in Oregon, the "Salvage Chief" (after "Little Toot" became too childish) fascinated me. Front page stories of heroic deeds. Too bad she's now a museum ship in Astoria. The "Chief" would have had those small boats off the rocks post haste.

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  10. #3200
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    At the deck, there would be chafing gear where the mooring lines passed through the bow chocks or over a bow roller. The bow roller would also have a security pin to keep the mooring line from jumping off the roller.
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    The salvage team came armed this morning with their tool of choice: a chainsaw. The beached powerboat filled with sand overnight, and its starboard side was buried 3'. The option of towing off the beach was quickly dismissed. RRRrrrip. Out came the fuel tank. RRRRRRrrr. Off came the flying bridge and flag pole. Everything that was being removed was carried across the sand to a waiting truck.

    I asked the salvage master what broke on the mooring? His reply was short: "The mooring line aboard the boat jumped off the bow roller and quickly cut itself on the roller cheek."

    Negligence. It seems in ample supply.
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-16-2019 at 09:08 PM.

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