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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3851
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    A paddle up Soquel creek.... you know, that just sounds excellent, right now.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  2. #3852
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    [QUOTE=Dazzler;26728]
    The boat is a 17’ National class one-design. The sail insignia is partially visible. They were not a very popular boat in the Bay Area, but I think there were some out of Palo Alto. Palo Alto used to have a marina before it was allowed to silt in. As a teenager, I would ride my bike From Portola Valley to the Palo Alto Marina just to look at the boats. [QUOTE]

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    The story and photos of what happened in the 80's to Palo Alto Harbor and its demise are compelling SF Bay history and can be found here: http://www.paloaltohistory.org/the-p...cht-harbor.php

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    There was a very competitive Bay racing class, the 505, headquartered out of Palo Alto Harbor with big name skippers and crews including Chris Boome, Dave Wahle, Dr. Dennis Surtees, Chris Gasprich, Art Lange, Dave Vickland, Jay Kunzel, Dirk Vynne, Pip Pearson, and other names we may recognize. Palo Alto roadstead, SE of the Dumbarton Bridge, was a great place to sail: smooth water on the flood, fresh afternoon winds, and soft mud that allowed you to tack a Triton with 4 feet of draft in 3 feet of water to get current relief.

    You were there if you remember the navigation tool: a "South Bay Sextant."
    Last edited by sleddog; 06-23-2020 at 03:42 PM.

  3. #3853
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    The Ocean Voyages Institute's sailing cargo ship KWAI pulled into Pier 29 in Honolulu this morning with more than 103 tons of marine trash hauled from the middle of the Pacific Ocean, mission complete despite the ongoing pandemic. The Sausalito, Calf.-based nonprofit, led by Mary Crowley, once again chartered the locally-based, sailing cargo ship KWQAI for the 48-day expedition that set out in early May.

    “I am so proud of our hard working crew,” said Crowley. “We exceeded our goal of capturing 100 tons of toxic consumer plastics and derelict ‘ghost’ nets, and in these challenging times, we are continuing to help restore the health of our ocean, which influences our own health and the health of the planet.”

    The latest haul is more than double the one from last summer, which culled 42 tons of debris after 25 days out at sea. On last year’s expedition, the institute deployed GPS-enabled satellite beacons, drones and other technology to better track the debris in the ocean, and has found it plays a key role in more effectively removing it. The beacons were placed on nets with the help of crowd-sourced yachts and other commercial vessels, based on Crowley’s theory that one tracker leads to other nets.

    Crowley, a lifelong sailor, was hoping to launch a considerably larger expedition this year, with more vessels over a three-month period, but had to scale back due to the impacts of the pandemic. The KWAI, captained by Capt. Brad Ives, nevertheless embarked on the expedition, departing from Hilo on May 4 after a self-imposed quarantine of three weeks.

    “We were very careful to keep the crew quarantined, and to test any new crew members coming on board because we wanted to make sure the expedition was safe from a health perspective,” Crowley said.
    She hopes the pro-active approach to removing the marine debris in the Gyre — halfway between Hawaii and California — will help spare coral reefs as well as wildlife, including whales, dolphins, and sea turtles from entanglements.

    “We feel that our cleanup work in the Gyre really helps address some of this debris before it arrives in the islands,” she said. “The oceans can’t wait for these nets and debris to break down into microplastics which impair the ocean’s ability to store carbon and toxify the fragile ocean food web.”

    With the help of Matson, the debris collected, including large piles of ropes and fishing nets and discarded consumer plastics, will be sent to West Coast destinations to be transformed into fuel and repurposed into building insulation.

    Crowley is raising funds for another cleaning expedition by the KWAI to the Gyre, expected to depart at the end of June, as well as next summer. She hopes to organize cleanup expeditions to other parts of the world as well.

    “Right now when the world is dealing with this very difficult time, it seems so important to pay attention to health on all levels,” she said. “I encourage people to take very good care of themselves right now, to follow all the procedures, to wear a mask, social distancing — all of these things are important. At the same time we should be paying attention to nature and making sure we keep the planet a healthy place to inhabit.”

    She noted that the institute’s advisory board member, Sylvia Earle, often cites ignorance, rather than overfishing or garbage, as having the most harmful impact on oceans today.

    “Most people don’t realize how closely our own health is tied to the health of the ocean,” said Crowley. “The ocean really produces two out of the three breaths we take. So we need to keep our ocean ecosystem healthy to help us stay healthy and to help the whole planet stay healthy.”

    Meanwhile, just north of Hilo on the Big Island, 21 shipping containers have gone overboard from a Young Bros. barge. 2 have been recovered by the CG.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 06-23-2020 at 09:27 PM.

  4. #3854
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazzler View Post
    This could be the start of an interesting thread drift: relating your first memory of sailing (where, when, boat type). Mine is when I was 5 or 6, my parents bought a Cape Cod Mercury 15’ S&S design, keel model. Interestingly they are still in production today.
    Long time friend and DH PacCup crew on WILDFLOWER in 2000, Viola from S. Lake Tahoe first sailed on Kettenberg-38 CARAVELLE in 1979 on Lake Tahoe. Here is CARAVELLE in a rail down southwest breeze looking good with snowy mountains in the back ground.

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  5. #3855
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    Anyone want to virtually sail the 2020 Singlehanded Transpac with me aboard my 1975 Wylie-27 WILDFLOWER, feel free to join in the fun by clicking on the SSS FORUM event discussion 2020 Singlehanded Trans Pacific Yacht Race
    at the thread "What Might Have Been."

  6. #3856
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    An "out-of-the-blue" call this afternoon from Robbie Buck onboard his Mull-30 ISIS at Hanalei. Robbie wanted to share he was looking at an "almost" triple rainbow astern towards Bali Hai....I asked Robbie how many boats were at anchor in Hanalei Bay. "We were the second, and now there are 17," was his reply.

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    Robbie also wanted to inquire about ISIS's history. I helped build ISIS in 1979 at C&B Marine in Soquel and we raced her in the first Pacific Cup, 1980, then called the" Kauai Race" to Nawiliwili Harbor. She was fire engine back red then.

    Robbie reported ISIS still has a fair turn of speed, and has won the Labor Day Race, Maui to Oahu, 3 times. "She'll sit on 12 knots," was his compliment to a now cruising and liveaboard home.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 07-05-2020 at 02:09 PM.

  7. #3857
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    Good news today from Capitola Boat Club Fleet Surgeon: Dave W. is home recovering from emergency appendectomy and feeling "best I've felt in weeks." Brother-in-Law Tom has successfully weathered his first chemo infusion. Howard is riding his scooter 24 hours after cyst removal. And I just received an "all clear" on my 4th CT scan in 4 years as we monitor lung nodules resulting from many years accumulation of inhalation of boat building micro particles including fiberglas and wood dust.
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-01-2020 at 10:21 AM.

  8. #3858
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Good news today from Capitola Boat Club Fleet Surgeon: Dave W. is home recovering from emergency appendectomy and feeling "best I've felt in weeks." Brother-in-Law Tom has successfully weathered his first chemo infusion. Howard is riding his scooter 24 hours after surgery on his back. And I just received an "all clear" on my 4th CT scan in 4 years as we monitor lung nodules resulting from many years accumulation of inhalation of boat building micro particles including fiberglas and wood dust.
    Excellent news on all counts, Skip!

  9. #3859
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    Though I enjoy rowing, have never understood ocean rowing, where progress, or lack of, is determined primarily by whims of wind and currents. This ocean rower's stated ambition is to break rowing records from SF to Hawaii. After 18 days, the course has been averaging south at an average speed of .9 knots. Hopefully soon the course will begin to curve south west. Even so, departing for this attempt in June means a likely possibility of becoming a sitting duck while crossing paths with Eastern Pacific tropical storms somewhere ahead.
    Last edited by sleddog; 07-05-2020 at 02:06 PM.

  10. #3860
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    Mar 2017
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    Los Osos
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    And, of course, today's weather forecasts are talking about tropical Storm Christine which is due to become a hurricane, located 700 miles S-SW of Cabo. I hope both rowers are able to ride out the upcoming weather in their individual craft. I am glad that I am not out there staring down to the S wondering...

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