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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3841
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    Mar 2017
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    I forwarded this page onto my sailing Scots friend, Peter Bruce, who lives up by Ladysmith in BC. He is always embarked upon some project or another, much to the humorous chagrin of his wife and grown sons. Just the ticket! A Wee project.

  2. #3842
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAGICdreamer View Post
    I forwarded this page onto my sailing Scots friend, Peter Bruce, who lives up by Ladysmith in BC. He is always embarked upon some project or another, much to the humorous chagrin of his wife and grown sons. Just the ticket! A Wee project.


    Ah yes. "Wee projects." I don't think it would spilling the beans to note as an anniversary present, the Magicians are in the midst of a bathroom remodel.. Notes Capt. Magician, "We are doing okay here, nursing the bathroom remodel project along bit by bit. Drywall is supposed to start Wednesday, the lath folks sometime this week as well as that most unreliable of all trades, the roofers. Cabinets about the 23rd, then the tile man….etc.

    As for their mini-MAGIC schooner, "R/C servos are on hand in order to be fitted prior to decking, which might make such a process overly-awkward. ;-0"

    Mum is the word whether MINI-MAGIC's purple gollywobbler will be deployable by radio control. I should also note, without turning this into a trivia question, a gollywobbler is not only a schooner's quadrilateral sail between the foremast and mainmast used for reaching/running, but also a sail used on the historical Chesapeake Bay Log Canoes (ketches,) as well as a logo of St. Michaels' wines of St. Michaels, Maryland.

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    And here's Vicky with a favorite schooner tool, the paint brush.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 06-17-2020 at 04:20 PM.

  3. #3843
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    Just to make Sleddog's gollywobbler comment...graphical (?), here you go:

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    Given how much running around I had to do to set or gybe the beast, I am not really sure how many servos and attendant R/C channels would be necessary to set and douse the reaching rig, but I would need a radio the size of a piano to have enough switches, perhaps.

  4. #3844
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    Sep 2007
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    An old SSS adage is "run what ya got."
    Yesterday, to celebrate the Solstice, I carried down hill and launched my old, 6', inflatable, Montgomery-Ward raft into our local Soquel Creek.

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    CHALLENGER 200 had seen better days, 2 of 3 air chambers seemed to have slow leaks. Besides the oars on my portage to launch, I carried a pump.

    40 years ago, during the 1980 flood, my neighbor and I, wet suit clad, had ridden down 2 miles of Soquel Creek in a Mr. Toad's wild ride scenario. Fortunately we avoided low branches, snags, and rapids and safely made it to the ocean where we agreed we'd "never do that again."

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    During summers, Soquel Creek flows at a placid rate to the lagoon at the ocean's edge. Native Americans lived here, dining on venison, trout, acorns and tubers, abalone, clams, and other seafood freshly caught from their tule reed canoes.

    During the late 19th century, loggers cut local forests, and there were sawmills on the banks of Soquel Creek, which drains a large watershed extending 16 miles inland to the Santa Cruz mountains.

    Yesterday, joined by Annie, we embarked for a voyage up now placid Soquel Creek as far as navigable. CHALLENGER 200 was perfect size, shoal draft, and just capable of carrying her two crew, plus chips, artichoke and jalapeno dip, and Compari and Peligrino refreshment. The slow leaks in chambers 1&2 did not prove a hindrance. Soon we were being followed by a single file armada of ducks intent on a bread crumb trail of chips.

    After passing under the two century old, rusty iron RR bridge, Soquel Creek narrowed and the west bank became shaded by high cliffs and 100 foot redwoods and eucalyptus. Soon, abeam the haunted Rispin Mansion barely visible in the foilage, we were in silence except for birdsong and the gentle splash of oars.

    Slowly we coasted inland, the creek's bottom visible inches below.

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    Finally, just below the footbridge overhead, we grounded for good in about 4" of water. Retracing our wake, we passed a resident on the east bank. "Where did you come from?" he inquired. "San Jose," we replied, "Which way is Capitola?" That left him scratching his head.

    By the time we reached the lagoon, we had regained civilization. Overhead, the Stockton Ave. Bridge was gridlocked by a fire truck, ambulance, and several LEO cars with flashing red lights. The ducks in our wake left us as we passed Margaritaville, chasing more lucrative appetizers. The grey marine layer (June gloom) was waiting at the ocean, necessitating breaking out fleece.

    We'd run what we got.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 06-21-2020 at 02:20 PM.

  5. #3845
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    My first memory of sailing was likely age 3 as crew with my father aboard his centerboard sloop GLAMOUR GIRL. I know it was centerboard, because we departed and landed on a sandy beach. Recently I came across a sistership of GLAMOUR GIRL.

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    For a pint of Ben & Jerry's Cherry Garcia, now with chocolate, can anyone tell us the location in the SF Bay Area of this boat, what class it is, and what significant thing it has in common with the Snipe? (All 3 questions must be answered correctly to win the Cherry Garcia, and there is no time limit. Guess away as many times as you want.)

  6. #3846
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    Sep 2008
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    SF Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    My first memory of sailing was likely age 3 as crew with my father aboard his centerboard sloop GLAMOUR GIRL. I know it was centerboard, because we departed and landed on a sandy beach. Recently I came across a sistership of GLAMOUR GIRL.

    For a pint of Ben & Jerry's Cherry Garcia, now with chocolate, can anyone tell us the location in the SF Bay Area of this boat, what class it is, and what significant thing it has in common with the Snipe? (All 3 questions must be answered correctly to win the Cherry Garcia, and there is no time limit. Guess away as many times as you want.)
    I know that location. It’s the lower floor of the San Francisco Maritime Museum (in the Aquatic Park Bathhouse Building). I wrote a paper while in college about that building and have done research in their photo archives.

    The boat is a 17’ National class one-design. The sail insignia is partially visible. They were not a very popular boat in the Bay Area, but I think there were some out of Palo Alto. Palo Alto used to have a marina before it was allowed to silt in. As a teenager, I would ride my bike From Portola Valley to the Palo Alto Marina just to look at the boats.

    The significant thing in common with the Snipe one-design is that they were both designed by THE RUDDER magazine Editor and small boat designer William F. (“Bill”) Crosby from Pelham, New York. Plans for home building Nationals first appeared in the January 1937 issue of the magazine.

    I just found specific information about the boat in the photo: THE MAB
    https://www.nps.gov/safr/learn/histo...re/the-mab.htm
    Last edited by Dazzler; 06-20-2020 at 05:52 PM. Reason: Added link to more information.
    Tom P.

  7. #3847
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazzler View Post
    I know that location. It’s the lower floor of the San Francisco Maritime Museum (in the Aquatic Park Bathhouse Building). I wrote a paper while in college about that building and have done research in their photo archives.

    The boat is a 17’ National class one-design. The sail insignia is partially visible. They were not a very popular boat in the Bay Area, but I think there were some out of Palo Alto. Palo Alto used to have a marina before it was allowed to silt in. As a teenager, I would ride my bike From Portola Valley to the Palo Alto Marina just to look at the boats.

    The significant thing in common with the Snipe one-design is that they were both designed by THE RUDDER magazine Editor and small boat designer William F. (“Bill”) Crosby from Pelham, New York. Plans for home building Nationals first appeared in the January 1937 issue of the magazine.

    I just found specific information about the boat in the photo: THE MAB
    https://www.nps.gov/safr/learn/histo...re/the-mab.htm
    Congrats and props to DAZZLER on enlightening us on the National One Design class, and the MAB on display at the San Francisco Maritime Museum. Well done, we hope you have room in your freezer for the Cherry Garcia!

    As Tom mentions, William F. Crosby also designed the 15' Snipe in 1931, a still active one design class and sweet dinghy to sail that doesn't need hunky crew weight or strength, has tactical racing, and will plane given 15-20 knots of wind.

    Compared to the Snipe, the 2 foot longer National One Design had a centerboard and under hull spade rudder rather than a daggerboard and transom hung rudder of the Snipe.

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    I believe Palo Alto Harbor, before it's demise, used to have an active 505 fleet also. More on that later.

  8. #3848
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    My first memory of sailing was likely age 3 as crew with my father aboard his centerboard sloop GLAMOUR GIRL (17’ NATIONAL ONE-DESIGN). I know it was centerboard, because we departed and landed on a sandy beach.
    This could be the start of an interesting thread drift: relating your first memory of sailing (where, when, boat type). Mine is when I was 5 or 6, my parents bought a Cape Cod Mercury 15’ S&S design, keel model. Interestingly they are still in production today.

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    The boat was kept on a mooring on Long Island Sound for the summer. My father built a plywood pram (very much the shape of an El Toro) for rowing out to the mooring. I don’t recall anything to do with an outboard motor, but we must have had one. We typically used a canoe paddle for “auxiliary” propulsion.

    Swimming was a big part of going sailing, but I also remember my mother taking us (four brothers) out fishing while our dad was away.
    Tom P.

  9. #3849
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    [QUOTE=Dazzler;26732]This could be the start of an interesting thread drift: relating your first memory of sailing (where, when, boat type)..QUOTE]

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    Forwarded from Capt. Bob "My father's first boat in Wilmington Channel (San Pedro, Ca) was ADIOS, a 25 foot woody of unknown design. You can see my 5 year old self in cockpit with Mom and Dad. Thanks to him, and all our dads on this Father's Day. Without him and his first 4 sailboats, I would not have gotten into ocean racing, Cal Maritime Academy, and become Capt. Bob. So 'Thanks Bill Buell!!'"

  10. #3850
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    I believe that Mab, or an equally stunning sistership is currently in the SF Maritime museum warehouse in San Leandro, as I saw a stunning wooden national one design there when I was invited to visit the warehouse by a buddy who had a contract electronically measure a large number f boats in the collection and draw up plans such that they could be rebuilt. It's a fascinating place.

    My first sailing experience was in El Toro's at the MPYC, but shortly after that I was crewing for a family friend, Col. Oliver Wood on his plywood Mercury out of Stillwater Cove. Col. Wood transformed from a relatively quiet-spoken man to a wild and aggressive sort on the water. I got used to it, in time. If I had not bought the Piper, a Mercury would be a prime candidate for me, in "downsizing" mode.
    Last edited by AlanH; 06-22-2020 at 07:39 AM.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

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