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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #2531
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    Dec 2012
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    Jackie may have beat me to it -
    the boat is AXEL HEYST - Harold Nelson (as noted in the program)

    Skip - interestingly enough, at some point Latitude 38 replaced the missing sextant trophy with the current perpetual bowl... when I went to pull the plate for engraving, I noticed that there is a blank space for 1977.
    That will be remedied! 1977 - Skip Allan / Wildflower

    DH
    Last edited by DaveH; 05-23-2018 at 10:02 AM.

  2. #2532
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiger beetle View Post
    Hi Skip -

    I think the mystery boat is Axel Heyst III. That spinnaker is rather distinctive, as is the cabin.

    I actually don't know who has her now, but if Jackie's post above is accurate then Harold Nelson was sailing the boat then.

    Ah! - the shoe just dropped, that was Hal Nelson that had the Axel Heyst down in the estuary at Nelson's Boat Yard. That's where I would see the boat. It was a big boat! I did have to go look up if Hal had Axel Heyst (I didn't know that off the top of my head).
    - rob/beetle
    Winner, winner, chicken dinner to TIGER BEETLE by less than a minute over DOMINO. Honorary mention to Philpott who somehow has reached into her memorabilia and pulled out the entry list for the '77 SHF. How did Jackie do that?

    AXEL HEYST, and her skipper Hal Nelson, is the subject of the trivia quiz. For many years, Nelson had Nelson's boatyard on Alameda, and was a tough, rugged sailor, as was his father, and son Carl, now manager of Channel Islands Boatyard and Marina south of Santa Barbara/Ventura.

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    Says her current owner in an ad:

    "Axel Heyst is a classic ocean racing boat that was one of the early applications of light weight cold molded construction. This is a very well built boat that is lots of fun to sail and can win races. I have raced her off shore in some pretty significant conditions and she hasn't complained at all. At one point (with a prior owner, decades ago) she was dismasted and rerigged with what is essentially a deck-stepped SC-50 rig and an oversized pole. She rates 96 in PHRF, but with a little wind can blow the doors off of a J-105. In fact, once I sailed well ahead of and around the front of the entire San Francisco J-105 fleet! With a bunch of wind this boat will surf in the mid teens. A project boat, but one that will result in a fast and beautiful vessel that turns heads wherever she goes. 8 foot draft, disp. = 23,000 lbs"

  3. #2533
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    Jan 2010
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    "How did Jackie do that?" hehehe

  4. #2534
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    With at least 4 SSS'ers in attendance, including Commodore Herrigel, Christine, and Jonathan, a final chapter was drawn yesterday in Santa Cruz with a Made in Santa Cruz celebration, sponsored by SCYC. "MISC" began in the overcast and chilly afternoon with Jester and El Toro races down and up the Harbor, its narrow channel constricted even more by large visiting squid boats and two maxi O'Neill catamarans re-entering between sets of a Southern Hemisphere swell.

    After 4 races, with Chris Watts winning the Jesters, everyone ascended to the club to view memorabilia and hear reminiscences. To standing room only, Bill Lee, Ron Moore, and Homer Lighthall all spoke, and there was much laughter, applause, and cheering Also recognized were the donors to MISC, and to a beautiful bronze sculpture by sailor/sculptor Courtney Scruggs in front of SCYC "dedicated to the designers and builders of ultralight displacement boats who changed the sport of sailboat racing."

    We would be remiss not to remember the many hundreds of individuals who helped create and support the MISC industry during the 60's, 70's, and 80's, when the only thing bigger economically in our small beach town was being grown in the local hills. Laminators, craftsmen (Alvie, KT and Andre,) brokers, accountants, journalists, truck drivers, a new marine hardware store (West Marine). Keel pourers (Tom Carr, Doug Brower, and Dave Wahle), sailmakers (Kurt Larsen and Dave Hodges), sparmaker Buzz Ballenger, and dozens, even hundreds, more, across town and the West Coast..

    As long as Santa Cruz built ultra lights surf Pacific swells, smiles will light up and Fast Is Fun will prevail. We all have our favorite boats and favorite stories from this era. Favorite boats? 505? Moore 24? Express 27? Santa Cruz 50? A little known piece of Santa Cruz trivia is Buzz Ballenger probably built more boats than anyone: between 40-50 505's and nearly 200 Banshees.. In addition, Bill Lee delivered 17 68 footers, based on his iconic MERLIN, as well as dozens of SC-27's, 33's, 40's, 50's and 52's, while across town George and Lyn were turning out O-30's, 25's, 29's, 34's and 40's and Alsberg was building Express 27's, 34's, and 37's. As Ron Moore recalled last night, despite the popularity of the Moore 24, his most famous boat was the winged wonder, the Moore 30, which with a crew of 12 would plane in a whisper or capsize, whichever came first. According to Ron, his Moore 30 (designed by G. Mull), made the cover of every sailing magazine of the day.

    One of my favorite stories briefly lit up Santa Cruz Harbor one Friday afternoon after crew practice aboard SC-70 #15 MIRAGE. Owner Jim Ryley was enjoying driving his big sled under spinnaker at 16-20 knots as we approached the Harbor entrance. Our crew of 8 whispered a plot, and as MIRAGE spinnakered in the Entrance, we all slipped below, the spinny halyard tail and lazy guy in hand down the forehatch. Jim was all smiles as we passed the Crow's Nest and restaurant goers had their noses glued to the windows watching the spectacular entry of an apparent singlehander flying a spinnaker on such a large boat in such narrow confines. Jim waved and smiled a big grin to the crowd. But you could hear a note of concern in his voice as the Harbor Bridge approached. "Guys?" Hey, Guys!" "Guys!!!" Just then, as pretty as you please, the halyard was run and the spinnaker disappeared down the forehatch with no one on deck....Jim spun MIRAGE into her slip on F dock, and everyone appeared on deck, all grins Only in Santa Cruz.

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    For your Friday trivia, there will be at least 26 Made in Santa Cruz entries in this summer's SHTP and Pacific Cup. 41% of the fleet of which race will have been built in Santa Cruz?

    .
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-25-2018 at 09:52 PM.

  5. #2535
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    Dec 2012
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    From the posted entry lists, that would be the SHTP.

    As an interesting side note, even if you mash the 2 lists together, Santa Cruz built boats account for over a quarter of the entries at 28%

    DH

  6. #2536
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    Oct 2007
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    Jesters and the paparazzi were out. (El Toros too.)Name:  0759.jpg
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  7. #2537
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    Dec 2007
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    The plaque/sculpture is aswesome. I bet that was a great party, sorry I missed it. Okay, back to work. There is a start line in the all too near future. (Do the lists ever get shorter?)

  8. #2538
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    Mar 2018
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    Santa Cruz CA
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    The lists keep growing and the check amounts keep getting LARGER!
    Good luck, try to have fun.

  9. #2539
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    The Around-the-State Race is no more. This classic ocean race circumnavigated the Hawaiian Islands, leaving all 8 major islands to port, and was held even years in early August from 1972-1990.

    There were miles of spectacular coastline passed close aboard in the Around-the-State Race, including the Napali Coast on Kauai and the north shore of Molokai with its thousand foot waterfalls plummeting into the blue ocean.

    What stands out in my mind was one night in 1988 aboard the 45' Reichel/Pugh IOR sloop INSATIABLE. We had rounded South Point (Ka Lae) at 1310 hours with the 52 foot JUBILATION just ahead, wind 082 degrees, 21 knots. Ahead was the 65 mile beat up the Ka'u coast to Cape Kumakahi, the most eastern point of the Hawaiian chain.

    From experience we knew there was less south flowing current on the beach than further offshore. But in the dark, with active lava flows, clouds of sulphur and steam, and a coast line that was changing on an active basis, all navigation was by guess, golly, and tearing eyeballs. We didn't want to get too close to the lava rivers in the dark as we short tacked the coastline. It was a spectacular sight from seaward.

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    Nearing dawn the next morning, we could see the loom of the Cape Kumakahi lighthouse, 156 feet high, flashing 15 sec., visible 24 miles. I had visited the Kumakahi lighthouse the previous year on a voyage with WILDFLOWER from French Polynesia back to Santa Cruz, with a stop in Hilo, 26 miles to the northwest from Cape Kumakahi. On my visit to Cape Kumakahi I learned its history and saw an amazing thing.

    In 1927, annual petitions for a lighthouse at Cape Kumakahi had gone unfunded by the Hawaiian Territory’s delegate to the U.S. Congress. The importance of a light on Cape Kumukahi was significant, not only to the increase in shipping traffic since the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914, but also planes on transpacific flights. At the time, Hilo was the second largest port in the Hawaiian Territory.

    Finally, on December 31, 1928, the U.S. Government purchased fifty-eight acres on Cape Kumukahi for the sum of $500. During the following year, a thirty-two-foot wooden tower capped with an automatic acetylene gas light was built at the cape for local use – not exactly the powerful landfall light the Lighthouse Board had envisioned years before.

    Four years later, sufficient appropriations were at last made for a primary seacoast light for Cape Kumukahi. An asphalt road was built in 1932 to link the lighthouse to the nearest highway, and the following year, two five-room dwellings, water tanks, sidewalks, and a reinforced concrete foundation for the tower were completed.

    Due to the frequent earthquakes associated with volcanic activity in the area, a unique foundation was designed for the lighthouse tower. Lava was first excavated and a massive concrete block was installed in the resulting hole. A second concrete block was placed above the first with a thick layer of sand in between. This design allowed the lower block to move with the earth, without transmitting shocks to the tower.

    The following year, a square, pyramidal, skeleton tower was constructed of galvanized steel, and two, thirty-six-inch airway beacons were placed at its top, roughly 125 feet above the ground. To supply power for the light and keeper’s dwellings, three engine-generators units were installed in a corrugated powerhouse located at the base of the tower.

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    With a strength of 1,700,000 candlepower, Cape Kumukahi Light was the strongest in the Hawaiian Islands, and only the concrete Molokai Lighthouse at Kalaupapa, at 213'. was taller. Veteran keeper Charles K. Akana, who had served at nearly every major light in the islands, was brought in to take charge of the new station. Due to the bareness of the landscape, the keeper’s dwellings were located over a half mile from the tower.

    In 1938, Joe Pestrella was transferred from the lighthouse tender KUKUIi to the barren station at Cape Kumukahi. On his own time and at his own expense, Pestrella brought in soil and trees and succeeded in turning a desolate spot into a place of beauty. Included in his orchard were lemon, mango and tangerine trees, and a rare bay leaf tree.

    Cape Kumukahi is included in Kilauea Volcano’s active east rift zone. In 1955, a lava flow threatened the station, but Pestrella remained on duty at the peril of his life to keep the light running. For his dedicated years of service at the station, he was selected as Civil Servant of the Year for the Hawai`i area in 1956.

    On January 13, 1960, a fiery fountain of lava, roughly half a mile long, shot up in a sugar cane field, two miles east of the Kumakahi lighthouse and just north of the town of Kapoho. Bulldozers and fire hoses were used in attempts to divert and harden the flow. On January 21, the flow appeared to be heading north away from the village and the station. However, during the next week, the lava turned south and started to encroach on the station grounds. Pestrella’s wife and infant son were evacuated, but Pestrella remained at the station saying, “When my backside feels hot, I’ll move on. Not till then!!”.

    When the lava set the station’s gate ablaze, Pestrella surely felt the heat, and on January 28, he wisely decided to place the light on emergency power and leave the station. The lava flow swallowed the keeper’s dwellings and incinerated Pestrella’s orchard. That same day, the flow engulfed the town of Kapoho.

    On February 2, the heat from the flow caused the generator’s fuel tanks at the tower to explode, and the light was extinguished. As the river of lava approached within a few feet of the tower, it remarkably divided into two streams that flowed past each side of the structure, leaving the tower unscathed. The Kapoho eruption had covered over ten square kilometers and added two square kilometers of land to the island.

    It was this astonishing division of lava flow in 1960 around the Cape Kumakahi lighthouse I observed in 1987. Locals were daily leaving gifts and wreaths at the base of the light tower to honor and appease the Hawaiian Goddess of Light and Fire, Pele, who they believed saved the lighthouse.

    Today, after surviving the lava flow, the lighthouse is fully automated, and Pestrella, its last keeper was transferred to Makapu`u Lighthouse on O`ahu.

    As we passed Cape Kumakahi and bore away to the northwest that morning in 1988 my log notes "squalls, wind 20-34 from 110 degrees. 37 sail changes to date. The boat is wetter inside than out."
    Last edited by sleddog; 05-29-2018 at 11:50 AM.

  10. #2540
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Hi Jackie,

    Oakland's water, along with much of the East Bay, comes from East Bay MUD (Municipal Utilities District.) EBMUD water is from the Mokelumne Aqueduct, fed by the Mokelumne River in the Central Sierra, which ultimately enters the Delta.

    85% of San Francisco's drinking water is from spring snowmelt running down the Tuolumne River, now damned at Hetch Hetchy Valley. The Hetch Hetchy watershed is entirely in Yosemite National Park. The water from this 160 mile infrastructure ultimately fills Crystal Springs Reservoir, south of San Francisco, near the Pulgas Water Temple. "Water Temple?" Yup, just off Highway 280.
    If you are a SF Bay Area resident, one of 2.6 million residing in 26 cities in 4 counties, here is a graphic of where your drinking water is coming from, courtesy of this morning's Oakland Tribune.

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    Hetch Hetchy

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